New to trailer loading - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 17 Old 09-25-2015, 12:11 PM
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Beau, I don't think you're in the same realities as many other people are with trailers. Your experience seems to be focused around solely yours or very few other people's horses who are trained the way you choose and expect, however it's unrealistic to expect everyone else and every other horse on the face of the planet to adhere to your views or expectations.

Once again, all the power to those who have horsesthat just self load when they are pointed at the trailer, I know more than a few that do so easily. I've also trailered many who aren't so willing or require different tactics or approaches.

And yelling "Well, train them better!" Isn't always a fair argument. If you're suggesting that every single horse on the face of the planet can be successfully trained to self load, well, we will have to agree to disagree on that.

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post #12 of 17 Old 09-25-2015, 12:23 PM
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Since you HAVE the trailer, lead the pony up, front feet only, back out. Gradually add a little hold with front feet on. Backing out is YOUR idea. Add back feet. Stand, treat if you want, then back down. Do not tie. Let him learn to stand quietly, with you in the trailer.
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post #13 of 17 Old 09-25-2015, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrivatePilot View Post
Beau, I don't think you're in the same realities as many other people are with trailers. Your experience seems to be focused around solely yours or very few other people's horses who are trained the way you choose and expect, however it's unrealistic to expect everyone else and every other horse on the face of the planet to adhere to your views or expectations.
I'm not sure why you feel the need to specifically call me out.

The OP came on a public forum and asked for suggestions. That's part my suggestion. Teach the horse to self load.

Then the OP said that they frequently haul other people's horse's that won't self-load. So then I questioned the OP on why they need to haul other people's horses in their trailer; especially if it puts his wife into a dangerous situation.

I am just as entitled as everyone else to post MY opinion on a public forum.

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post #14 of 17 Old 09-25-2015, 02:59 PM
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I recognize that, however some of what your writing comes across as preaching down to people whose horses don't self load. Perhaps I'm reading it wrong or that wasn't the intention, however that's the vibe I got.

It's been my experience that self loaders are the exception, not the norm, so I'm not sure it's prudent to make people think that because their horses need to tap on the bum or someone in the trailer leading them in...that they're somehow failing (or have failed) with their training.

My daughter started a pony in December of last year and showed her quite a lot this year, she is the textbook definition of a self loader - excited and eager to go on the trailer for her next adventure. That said I know of plenty other far more seasoned horses that are not anywhere close to being as willing. Usually it's nothing more than a good old-fashioned stubbornness and as little as a sternly said few words is enough to change their mind (since they know it's not an option), but it doesn't change the fact that they would not be considered self loaders as a result.
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post #15 of 17 Old 09-25-2015, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrivatePilot View Post
I recognize that, however some of what your writing comes across as preaching down to people whose horses don't self load. Perhaps I'm reading it wrong or that wasn't the intention, however that's the vibe I got.

It's been my experience that self loaders are the exception, not the norm, so I'm not sure it's prudent to make people think that because their horses need to tap on the bum or someone in the trailer leading them in...that they're somehow failing (or have failed) with their training.
Where exactly did I "preach down" to anyone?

And where did I say anyone has "failed" in their training?

You're pulling ideas out of thin air.

The OP is concerned about SAFETY. And it is safer not to be in the trailer at the same time as the horse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PrivatePilot View Post
It's been my experience that self loaders are the exception, not the norm,
So it's okay for you to draw from your own experience, but it is not okay that I do the same?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PrivatePilot View Post
Your experience seems to be focused around solely yours or very few other people's horses who are trained the way you choose and expect,


.....And with that, you can stop preaching down to me now. Thanks.

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post #16 of 17 Old 10-05-2015, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by kmacht View Post
We tried loading him by having my wife lead him straight into the trailer on a lead line. Just as she got to the front she hooked the trailer tie and a soon as I went to go hook the butt chain he started to panic.

So my question is, what is the safest way to do this.
You have a lot of good responses already. I would add just one suggestion. When I load a horse, whether by leading it in or sending it in, I NEVER try to secure it in any way until I am convinced the horse is content to be in the trailer. If the horse wants back out, I let it out. If I have to reload it ten times, I will reload it ten times.

To climb into the tiny dark confined space of a trailer goes against every instinct a horse has. The last thing I want to do is amplify that natural fear by making the horse feel trapped.

In my experience, allowing the horse to leave the trailer prevents the situation from escalating to panic, which make future loading quicker and easier. To quote Parelli, "take the time it takes so it takes less time."
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post #17 of 17 Old 10-05-2015, 06:15 PM
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You've gotten really solid points, but i just want to add the extra "intangible" when trailering/loading, and this to be calm, in control and try to do so without nerves. Horses sense our apprehension and fear, and that in turn, causes them to become afraid.

I read it on here and it makes perfect sense: it you have all day, it will take 15 minutes... if you have 15 minutes, it will take all day.

Every time I trailer now, I go into it with the expectation that me and my horse have all the time in the world to get her butt up on that trailer, that inside the trailer is a safe place, and that coming out of the trailer is a slow and steady exercise. If I'm calm, confident and purposeful in my actions getting her in, she-- in turn-- is calm, confident and takes my lead.
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