new western rider - The Horse Forum
 43Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 11:37 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Europe
Posts: 74
• Horses: 0
Red face new western rider

Hi everyone :)



My name is Jolien, I am from Belgium and I just started taking western riding lessons. :) I ride (on a friend's horse) without a bit (neck reining) because I personally feel better riding that way. (not a fan of English riding... :s) I have always loved animals and love interacting and working with them because it clicks.

I like to observe animals to learn about their behaviour because I want to understand them as good as I can and interact with them in their language so they feel at ease and my communication is clear. I think this helps animals relax and build trust in you. I already read 2 books on horse behaviour and training and watched 30 video's on Youtube to prep myself for my first riding lessons. I want to keep learning (!), so any tips on books and video's are greatly appreciated! (Also if there are good documentary's or video's on wild horses behaviour? With a narrator really explaining what they are doing and why/minimal cues in behaviour, tiny gestures, etc... Please do tell me.) :)


furthermore I do hope (although I am from Belgium) to meet some ppl here who love animals as much as I do. :)
Jolien is offline  
post #2 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 12:22 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 9,689
• Horses: 0
WELCOME to the Forum....

Sounds like you are well on your way to being book savvy on riding, now for the practical application of what you've read and watched on video.
Enjoy the journey...

Might I encourage you to read the forum rules so you can post and use the forum to its fullest potential...there are some great tips many miss out on when they skip the reading.
Rules can be found on any page top by clicking on the RULES button/word.
Again, welcome and enjoy your time with us.
...
Jolien likes this.

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
horselovinguy is online now  
post #3 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 12:28 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: SE Oklahoma
Posts: 2,922
• Horses: 8
Hello and welcome to HF and to western riding!


I can't answer the question about wild horse behavior videos with proper narration as to horse politics and hierarchy, language, etc, but I can recommend you watch Warwick Schiller. He has many videos on youtube and explains domestic horse behavior, reactions, and 'language better than I think anyone can. He's rather matter of fact about things, he's an Aussie so he calls it like he sees it and very forthrightly so but he's never hateful or tacky.


I strongly recommend binging on his videos, but also spending a lot of time in the company of horses, both in a group and alone and simply observe. Horses are very talkative. They're very expressive. Some are quite verbal. They are individuals within a herd with very distinct personalities, histories, and hang ups. They are also very honest - horses don't lie. They don't pull punches to save human pride and preserve human ego. The best thing I've ever done in my understanding of how the horse talks to me and how they behave is to simply crack a beer open, and sit in a chair outside my tack room, and watch them in the pasture and at the feed trough. Learning to speak their language and learning to listen to them and speak back will be one of the most rewarding things you can do... and doesn't even require a saddle.


Wishing you the best of luck on your endeavor! Enjoy it!
bsms and SteadyOn like this.

"We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us."
AtokaGhosthorse is offline  
post #4 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 12:35 PM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: NW Connecticut
Posts: 2,430
• Horses: 1
"Neck reining/direct reining," "bit/no bit," and "gentle/harsh riding" are three independent axes of the riding coordinate system. You can choose any one parameter independently from the other two. The most important thing for you now is to get actual experience, not to let bias prevent you from becoming experienced.

Have fun, and welcome!
mmshiro is offline  
post #5 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 01:14 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Europe
Posts: 74
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtokaGhosthorse View Post
Hello and welcome to HF and to western riding!


I can't answer the question about wild horse behavior videos with proper narration as to horse politics and hierarchy, language, etc, but I can recommend you watch Warwick Schiller. He has many videos on youtube and explains domestic horse behavior, reactions, and 'language better than I think anyone can. He's rather matter of fact about things, he's an Aussie so he calls it like he sees it and very forthrightly so but he's never hateful or tacky.


I strongly recommend binging on his videos, but also spending a lot of time in the company of horses, both in a group and alone and simply observe. Horses are very talkative. They're very expressive. Some are quite verbal. They are individuals within a herd with very distinct personalities, histories, and hang ups. They are also very honest - horses don't lie. They don't pull punches to save human pride and preserve human ego. The best thing I've ever done in my understanding of how the horse talks to me and how they behave is to simply crack a beer open, and sit in a chair outside my tack room, and watch them in the pasture and at the feed trough. Learning to speak their language and learning to listen to them and speak back will be one of the most rewarding things you can do... and doesn't even require a saddle.


Wishing you the best of luck on your endeavor! Enjoy it!
Thank you for your tips! I subscribed to his channel! I am trying to spend time with horses, but I don't own any myself and I haven't found a good western riding stable nearby (taking private lessons), but in time I hope I will meet more horsepeople and maybe have the opportunity to spend more time with horses. I still have to learn alot. :)
AtokaGhosthorse likes this.
Jolien is offline  
post #6 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 01:19 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Europe
Posts: 74
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmshiro View Post
"Neck reining/direct reining," "bit/no bit," and "gentle/harsh riding" are three independent axes of the riding coordinate system. You can choose any one parameter independently from the other two. The most important thing for you now is to get actual experience, not to let bias prevent you from becoming experienced.

Have fun, and welcome!
Hi, ok! I am learning here, thanks for your answer. :) I don't know all the terms (certainly not in English), but the horse I ride is neck reined and has a headgear without a bit (with the reins attached underneath it's chin) I am not against English riding, it just isn't a good fit for me... I feel more comfortable in bitless riding (tried English too), it's my personal preference... I feel better and so I am more relaxed, which is good.
Jolien is offline  
post #7 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 02:36 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 47,076
• Horses: 2
Really, I have ridden my horse in both a halter ( a rope halter, no bit) and a bitted bridle (snaffle bit). He responds only slightly better in the bit. Our communication is slightly better in that bit. Less confusion leads to more calmness.


Clear communication IS what makes riding more enjoyable for both the horse and the human, and if a bit makes that better, then that is what I will use. I ride in a dressage saddle, out on the trails, holding the reins like a cowboy on the range; very loose. I both direct and neck rein.
The horse does not distinguish "English" and "Western". He just knows how to respond to a 'feel' on the rein, and a leg on his side, or the shift of my weight. What saddle I ride in is meaningless to him. Don't let human ideas of 'categories' close you into a box.
bsms, boots and AtokaGhosthorse like this.
tinyliny is offline  
post #8 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 03:35 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: SE Oklahoma
Posts: 2,922
• Horses: 8
I think what @mmshiro was trying to relate, OP, is to not get too hung up on thinking bitless=good, bits=bad; neck reining=good, direct reining=bad.


You can ride bitless and still ride a horse rough and mean.


You can ride in a bit and be the type of rider your horse both trusts and respects.


You can direct rein a horse and do so without tearing up the mouth.


You can neck rein and still be hanging on the reins and leave a horse's mouth bloodied up (I've seen it).


You can ride in spurs and use them effectively and never hurt a horse.


You can ride without spurs and kick them till they're sore with just the heels of your boots.


Welcome to western riding!
bsms, boots and mmshiro like this.

"We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us."
AtokaGhosthorse is offline  
post #9 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Europe
Posts: 74
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
Really, I have ridden my horse in both a halter ( a rope halter, no bit) and a bitted bridle (snaffle bit). He responds only slightly better in the bit. Our communication is slightly better in that bit. Less confusion leads to more calmness.


Clear communication IS what makes riding more enjoyable for both the horse and the human, and if a bit makes that better, then that is what I will use. I ride in a dressage saddle, out on the trails, holding the reins like a cowboy on the range; very loose. I both direct and neck rein.
The horse does not distinguish "English" and "Western". He just knows how to respond to a 'feel' on the rein, and a leg on his side, or the shift of my weight. What saddle I ride in is meaningless to him. Don't let human ideas of 'categories' close you into a box.
Yes, I totally understand that. And I think you are right... You have to respect animals, they are living creatures and not an object you can just use and steer. :) I am always gentle with the horses I ride, when something doesn't work out my first thought is to look at myself because I am probably being unclear in my intent. I never think that the horse is trying to bully me or be nasty. :)

I think it all comes down to experience: knowing your horse, knowing the body language and interacting in a good clear way with respect for the needs of the animal and your own safety (boundaries). The owner of the horse I ride says that he is better in western (likes it more/more responsive) so I trust her judgement (as a total beginner.) :) If I would have my own horse I would test and see what works best since every animal is different and has it's own character... But this is probably something that I will only be able to 'see' when I get more experience... :)

The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding go out and meet it. (-Thucydides)
Jolien is offline  
post #10 of 40 Old 08-19-2019, 04:24 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: CenTex
Posts: 1,173
• Horses: 0
Since you're interested in horse behavior, I will give you the best piece of advice I have ever gotten about horses. In fact, several people gave me this advice: spend as much time as possible just watching horses. Best to watch them out in a herd, or if not that then in a paddock or corral. Just watch them. For at least half an hour, but the longer the better. Don't do anything else, and don't try to think about what you're doing or seeing, just watch them. It's like immersing yourself in a foreign languge. Before you know it, you'll understand exactly what their body language, head position, ear position, etc. mean.
ACinATX is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome