newbie - farrier and vet in one day - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 11-03-2018, 07:36 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Highland County, Va
Posts: 35
• Horses: 4
newbie - farrier and vet in one day

Hello, I'm new to the Horse Forum. I previously owned a horse some 20 odd years ago, but he lived with my mother. We rode trails nearly every week-end. My horse died of colic, and I made a decision to have children instead of horses.

My son is now 19 and living on his own, and my daughter is 17. We bought a farm 4 years ago and are now living there full-time.

This summer I volunteered at a therapeutic horse barn and fell back in love with horses. I put a deposit on a Quarter horse yearling. Then I decided I needed one to ride. We bought Baxter. Then we put a deposit on a second yearling. Only having one riding horse was not enough, so then we bought another. In the space of three months, I went from zero horses to four.

Two weeks ago, I fell off Farley (my fault), and he stepped on my ankle. It took me a week to get on him, but the ankle still hurts, so I only rode about 5 minutes.


Yesterday was a big day for us. The farrier came for the first time. Baxter was lying down a lot. The farrier was able to trim his front hooves, but he fought too much to do the back ones. Farley, ever the gentleman, did great.


I asked what he wanted to do about the young ones. I had put them in the round pen, so we went in with them. Mosby is a sweetheart and stood nicely to have all his feet done. Jubal is wary of strangers. I couldn't even get a lead rope on him; the stinker! We will work on being caught.


Baxter was still lying down, so the two of us decided I should call the vet. I did and also called a friend. While I was waiting, I walked Baxter. Both men arrived at the same time. They said Baxter had a mild case of colic. The treatment seems to have worked, and Baxter seems okay today.

I should note that Baxter is eating beet pulp and senior feed in order to gain weight. I got him from a rescue, and he was severely underweight. He has gained probably 200 pounds since August and looks like a completely different horse. Today, I only fed him a tiny amount. I guess I can slowly increase him back to what he was eating before. He grazed most of the day, so I think he is better. I kept trying to watch for a poop, but I never did see one.

Baxter 13 ridable but needs work; Mosby steady yearling; Jubal sensitive but smart yearling; Farley 13 the boss and very well trained
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post #2 of 10 Old 11-03-2018, 08:13 PM
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Hi @1 Dollar , glad it was a good outcome for Baxter. I've had years when the only time we've seen the vet is in the spring for shots, and then as Walka has aged, I'm on the phone every couple of months due to something. That's all part of horse ownership I guess.


You will be having some busy years with the young uns and training, but its all so rewarding . Enjoy and be safe.
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Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the floor each morning the devil says, "Oh crap, she's up!".
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post #3 of 10 Old 11-03-2018, 08:25 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Highland County, Va
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No kidding on the training! I only wanted 1 horse, which was Mosby the 1 1/2 year old. Every time my daughter and I went to visit him, Jubal was there. We ended up working with both of them, and Jubal won me over. He is super sensitive, and we felt like he needed to stay with Mosby.

As it turns out, Jubal is super smart. I decided that everyone needed to learn their names. Two of them were hard to catch. Jubal is the only one who comes at this point. The others will get there.
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Baxter 13 ridable but needs work; Mosby steady yearling; Jubal sensitive but smart yearling; Farley 13 the boss and very well trained
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post #4 of 10 Old 11-03-2018, 10:16 PM
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Hello and welcome to the forum and back into the world of horses:)

Please keep a close eye on Baxter. You need to see moist manure and more than one or two piles. There is such a thing as impaction colic that could be devastating.

I would also ask the vet about treating him for ulcers, once he is past the colic stage.

Best wishes for a fast recovery for Baxter and best wishes in your re-entry into horses:)
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A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #5 of 10 Old 11-04-2018, 12:21 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
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Location: Highland County, Va
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Thanks @walkinthewalk .

I spent 3 plus hours outside today hoping to get a poop view. No luck. He still seems okay, so maybe pooping was happening when I was not looking.

Two of those hours were actually spent picking up poop. Maybe tomorrow will give me a fresh Baxter poop.

At least he was walking around today, grazing and not lying down.
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Baxter 13 ridable but needs work; Mosby steady yearling; Jubal sensitive but smart yearling; Farley 13 the boss and very well trained
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post #6 of 10 Old 11-04-2018, 08:52 AM
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I really encourage you to read everything you can about horses. This forum is a great place for information and experience. You've got a lot on your plate with just the horses so I hope you have a good support system. There will be times when housework, gardening, cooking meals and even riding will have to take a back seat to the actual hands on care of all four horses.

All will need regular farrier work. Some horses need every 8 weeks some may need as often as every 4 weeks. You cannot go without a farrier so you have to make sure you keep him happy. This means handling all horses feet to clean them out every day. It also means teaching them to stand tied quietly while their feet get done. Your farrier has lots of clients who also depend on him. He will not risk a career ending injury from an unruly horse. So you have lots of homework to do between his visits. Otherwise he may very well tell you he can't do your horses anymore.

Even though we're going into winter, I would seriously look for an experienced trainer to help you with some basic techniques for teaching ground manners to those youngsters. They are very cute and do funny things, but they are not puppies. They quickly learn when a person is inexperienced and can develop bad habits like biting and kicking. That's how they play with each other but not acceptable to do with humans.

Use the search option in the forum and look up topics like hoof care, handling feet, colic and ground work to begin with. A lot of terms may be unfamiliar so you'll be looking things up along the way, just stick with it.

PLEASE stay with us here, post anything that comes up. There's no such thing as a silly question. You've got a tough road ahead of you for the next twenty-odd years. You may read comments that seem a bit harsh, but this is a horse forum and we are all here because of our deep love and commitment to horses. We want you to have success, fun, and develop a nice little family of healthy horses.
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post #7 of 10 Old 11-04-2018, 10:30 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Highland County, Va
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• Horses: 4
Thanks, @boo Walker.

I have worked with horses from age 4 (when my mother taught me to ride) to about age 30 when Sham died. I rode every chance I could get, gentled horses for people, rode horses that had retired from racing, etc. I am a good rider, but out of shape due to not riding for 20 some years.

I bought the yearlings from some neighbors who are now friends. Both of them are seriously good horse trainers and available for consultation. My mother is also a good trainer who worked with an even better trainer for years. Both my mother and Pat competed in judged trail rides for years and won. Pat's horses are what I term "obedience trained." I don't agree with everything that she does, but most of it is sound advice. Both of them are available by phone, and my mom wrote a book that I use frequently.


When I was complaining about Farley and Jubal not being easy to catch, Mom was the one who told me how to teach them to come to their names. Pat even taught hers to come when she was lying on the ground in case she got thrown. After my accident with Farley, I see the importance of that wisdom. I was lucky that the day he stepped on me, my husband was nearby. We also bought walkie talkies for me to use when I go riding. We live in the mountains and cell service is unreliable.


The farrier was super helpful and showed me what to do to get the younger ones used to having their feet handled. I will need to use the same type of method on Baxter's back feet. He is nasty about it. So much for the ad that said he could do everything with ease. There are not many farriers willing to travel to my county, so I hear you about keeping him happy. There was apparently one farrier who used to come here but let all his clients go except for one here. He told everyone he doesn't travel to my county anymore, but he will come for my friend with the therapeutic horse barn.

Baxter 13 ridable but needs work; Mosby steady yearling; Jubal sensitive but smart yearling; Farley 13 the boss and very well trained
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post #8 of 10 Old 11-04-2018, 11:12 AM
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You're in good hands!
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post #9 of 10 Old 11-04-2018, 05:08 PM
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Welcome the HorseForum.

It sounds like you have your hands full!

Are you soaking the sugar beet or feeding it dry? Personally I alaways soak it.
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post #10 of 10 Old 11-05-2018, 08:15 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Highland County, Va
Posts: 35
• Horses: 4
@Foxhunter

I found some beet pulp pellets and the directions said to soak them. I do, and they absorb an alarming amount of water. I think if you fed them to a horse dry that it would cause a serious problem.
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Baxter 13 ridable but needs work; Mosby steady yearling; Jubal sensitive but smart yearling; Farley 13 the boss and very well trained
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