Newbie with a lot of questions - The Horse Forum
 5Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 09-17-2017, 08:24 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 10
• Horses: 0
Newbie with a lot of questions

Hi there, I have been around horses through all my childhood but in recent years became a small bit afraid of them (I never fell of or got a kick, I don't know where fear came from) anyways, we have bought a house in the countryside and there is a horse at the end of our garden. He isn't in the best shape. Fear or no fear I would never see an animal suffering so I have to suck it up. He is very nervous as he was mistreated in the past. We are working each other out! His tail is in a desperate state. I have bought tail detangler but I don't know how I am ever going to get near it!! His nose also has a very old scar from having headcollar on all the time. It cut into him so I'm wondering if there is a way to ease that scar. He is a beautiful horse and it makes my morning to wake up and see him at the end of the garden. He is well fed now with his new owners and myself and my fiance but we have a lot to figure out with him so any advise I'll take it!!
Karen384 is offline  
post #2 of 11 Old 09-17-2017, 08:40 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 7,929
• Horses: 12
For the nose you might try aquaphor or mederma (human) or derma gel(animal), You can also get Vit E gels caps and puncture them and spread over the area.

I would just leave the tail for now. Work on him accepting you being in his space and grooming him. Start slow with the tail just running your hands over and down, gently pulling it to the side. When he is accepting of this you can add the detangler and start working it through with your fingers to start and see how it works. How is he with water? You may want to try bathing him and putting a bottle of cheap conditioner (suave works great - perhaps you have an equivalent product) over, working it in while you bath him so it can sit and then working your fingers through as you rinse.
QtrBel is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 09-17-2017, 09:23 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 10
• Horses: 0
Thank you :)
Karen384 is offline  
post #4 of 11 Old 09-17-2017, 10:33 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,124
• Horses: 2
The first thing you need to do is get him to accept you, and accept you touching him safely. Even if he has been handled, you can't just walk up to a strange horse and start brushing his tail!

I'd suggest you spend a lot of time just sitting near him. Bring a book and a folding chair, and sit where he can see you. Do this daily if you can, for a couple of weeks. Doesn't have to be for very long. Stay safe - you may want to start by setting up outside a fence, then inside it, but with your back against the fence. If he shows signs of aggression, get out. You may want to carry a crop or a small tree branch to send him away if necessary. Once he accepts you (he may start grazing near you for company, come over and sniff you, or just ignore you), you can start walking up to him and just letting him sniff you. You might offer treats - or not. Watch his body language as you walk up to him. If he turns away or moves away, stop and wait. Don't push it. When he looks at you, move towards him slowly (never from behind of course). When you're about 3 feet away, offer your hand. This can be done even if he's used to being handled because he will learn to trust you. Once he sniffs your hand or accepts the treat, move away again. Do this for a couple more weeks. This will teach him that you're not going to make him work or halter him every time you approach him. He may start to follow you around. That's good, but ok if he doesn't. Then you can start to "groom" him. Start with scratches at the shoulder, the withers, the neck. Do this regularly too. Move around his body, being mindful of what he likes and what he doesn't. If he moves away from you, let him. Some horses like scratches more than others, but most enjoy it in some spots. This should allow you to get him used to you touching him all over, so that eventually, he can be groomed properly. All of this is inspired by a program called Horsefulness Training which I am doing with my spooky mare. She has gone from a horse that always runs away from me, to a horse that seeks out my company - always completely at liberty. With a horse that has been abused, you need to work on trust before anything else.

Of course you need permission from the owners to do any of this, but it sounds like they're already ok with it.
knightrider likes this.
Acadianartist is offline  
post #5 of 11 Old 09-17-2017, 11:56 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 10,674
• Horses: 0
Your actions are wonderful in intention....

However, you refer to him being at the end of your property, in a garden area....
Please, before you go handling make sure, positively sure, you have permission from his now current owner{s} that you may touch, handle and groom their horse....
People can be protective sometimes of "their property" and even though your intention is only "good" for the animal make sure it is understood to be that way...

I do agree with Acadians post....
Go slow, don't push and always, ALWAYS give yourself an out to get away from the horse should something set him off to suddenly getting defensive and possibly aggressive from fear...
Never turn your back and watch closely for signs of attitude change toward you and what you are doing...
...
jmo...
Golden Horse and beverleyy like this.

The worst day is instantly better when shared with my horse.....
horselovinguy is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 09-17-2017, 03:33 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Northern Florida
Posts: 4,858
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Your actions are wonderful in intention....

However, you refer to him being at the end of your property, in a garden area....
Please, before you go handling make sure, positively sure, you have permission from his now current owner{s} that you may touch, handle and groom their horse....
People can be protective sometimes of "their property" and even though your intention is only "good" for the animal make sure it is understood to be that way...

I do agree with Acadians post....
Go slow, don't push and always, ALWAYS give yourself an out to get away from the horse should something set him off to suddenly getting defensive and possibly aggressive from fear...
Never turn your back and watch closely for signs of attitude change toward you and what you are doing...
...
jmo...
I was thinking the same. Is this a shared horse between you and your neighbor? If no, does the neighbor know that you are feeding him and have intentions of grooming him? If yes there is a lot of good advice already. If no, then getting permission would be the first thing. I put a lot of thought into how and what my horses eat with reasons behind all of it. Someone feeding and grooming my horses on the side without me knowing about it would be upsetting to me and for good reasons.

A little story: One day I was out mowing my lawn and my neighbor came to the fence to chat. I shut the mower off and we chatted a bit. Without thinking about it, I was holding the lever in the "give the mower gas position" while I was talking and flooded it so when I went to restart it, it wouldn't start. My neighbor asked if it was out of gas and I said "No, I just filled it up, I think it just got flooded". I decided to go in the house to get something to drink, cool off, and give the lawn mower a rest. The next thing I know, my good intentioned neighbor had come over, went in my shed, grabbed a gas can that I had left out in the rain the prior week and was now half filled with water and put it in my lawn mower. Reason for still having it around was that I did not want to dump gasoline on the ground and had not figured out where to dispose of it yet. Needless to say, my lawn mower became ill and had to be taken to get fixed. I know that he had good intentions, but still, I was not too happy about having to pay for it to get fixed. Thankfully it was a lawn mower that could wait until it was convenient for me to have it fixed.

My sister came home to a dead dog one time. She took it to the vet to try to find out what happened to him. A bone was lodged in his throat or intestine, I can't remember. She never gave her dogs bones but come to find out, the neighbor did and didn't think anything of it. He said it wasn't his fault, he always gave his dogs bones and nothing ever happened.

I'm not trying to say that you would purposefully do anything to the horse that would hurt him. Just get permission if you don't have it already.

There will be only one of you for all time. Fearlessly be yourself.
Coffee is my spirit animal

Last edited by LoriF; 09-17-2017 at 03:42 PM.
LoriF is online now  
post #7 of 11 Old 10-17-2017, 12:40 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 10
• Horses: 0
Just a quick check in re "sonas" the lovely Connemara at the end of our garden. The neighbours are fine with us feeding and grooming him. There is a marked improvement in him which I am glad to report. Hooves looking better. Big fluffy, even winter coat coming through nicely. Phlegm not nearly as bad as it was. Getting better with touch. I have been working on that every day and now his owners are thinking of having him broken in for their children. (A long way down the road) He has turned in to such a cheeky chappy!! If I even open the back door he is down the end of the garden calling me and will call me repeatedly until he gets attention!! his new owners have us his horrific back story too. He was found tied to a tree in the mountains. He had wriggled so much his headcollar tore off a lot of his skin. The night they rescued him he collapsed in their garden. They did a mighty job getting him to where he is and we are just giving them an extra hand to return this beautiful boy to his best. Makes me sick to the stomach to think what people do to animals but he is in great hands now! Thanks for all the advise!!
QtrBel and SilverMaple like this.
Karen384 is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 10-17-2017, 12:43 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: middle of nowhere
Posts: 3,867
• Horses: 3
Oh, I love Connemaras, there aren't nearly enough of them around here. Do you have a photo of him?

It sounds like he's coming along nicely and is in good hands.
SilverMaple is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 10-17-2017, 12:55 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 7,929
• Horses: 12
Sounds like he is coming around. He may need his "cheek" adjusted so talking to the owners and coming to a consensus of what to do when so bad habits don't develop may be in order. This is where many friendships fall apart. Take their lead but be aware of your safety. Connemaras are typically very easy keepers so his weight will need to be watched as you(they) don't want him to founder. They may already be aware of this depending on their experience. Pics are a must. Looking forward to seeing some.
QtrBel is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 10-17-2017, 12:59 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 10
• Horses: 0
He loves rolling in muck so this is the cleanest photo I have of him!! He nearly looks like a mule in it!! Begging as usual he is such a character!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Screenshot_20171017-165716-1_1508255905544.jpg (108.3 KB, 5 views)
Karen384 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A Lot of Cantering Questions ThatCrazyHorseGirl Horse Riding & Horse Activity 12 10-23-2015 05:21 PM
Newbie questions huntergrl Cowboy Mounted Shooting and Archery 6 02-04-2015 11:07 AM
brand new and have a lot of questions! mytedimensional Horse Forum Support Help Desk 0 11-05-2014 04:33 PM
Newbie here- several questions 4horses Driving 7 02-25-2013 01:02 AM
dry to grass lot- questions, worries, need suggestions drafts4ever Horse Health 4 06-08-2012 09:33 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome