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post #11 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 12:04 PM
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Part of other also inculdws how you define a healthy horse and what maintenance should be. I know any horses who the owners say they had fine and healthy, and that's true to an extent. They're not lame, they work fine, but maybe they have a bit of a hitch, or are girthy, or their coat is dull, or other little QoL things.

Right now the only maintenance mine get is one is on a RB.

If I had an income, I would be doing a lot more. Regular body work, Pentosan injections, vit E and msm supplement, BoT equipment. One of them would get an aggressive investigation into a few subtle behaviour offnessess. I'd ideally even be doing shock wave therapy on some scar tissue one has.

Plus board, training, lessons, and regular vet fees.

But, alas, I'm poor.
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post #12 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnitaAnne View Post
I have to board too, but have done self care also. It is expensive and time consuming.

Where I board is discounted because it is self care, we provide all the feed except pasture. One of the reasons I moved there was to decrease my need to be there twice a day every day. They have lots of pasture and a pond so I only grain them once a day.

Two of my horses are elderly; 26yrs and 21yrs. Fortunately their teeth are still good so they can eat hay and grass, but that will change as they age. I give them senior feed with is $21/bag. Right now they eat about a bag a week, but when their teeth give out I will have to increase that significantly. These horses are both basically retired, so I get to do all the work and pay all the money, but can't really use them.

I would wonder why you would want to own a "companion only" horse. It must have some sort of issue that prevents it from being ridden or driven. What ever that issue is will probably be the big expense for you. I would advise you to find out what the horse's problem is and what it costs to manage.

Usually "companion only" horses are put to pasture with young colts or blind horses or some other horse that needs a buddy for some reason. They are not usually the first choice for someone that wants a horse and has to board the horse. Why not get a horse you can use?

As horses age they cost more and more to feed and the vet bills go up too. My older ones cost twice as much to keep as my 9yr old.

You are planning to pay $5/day for a horse you can't ride. What happens if this barn you are at has to sell up and they turn it into houses packed together? Where will you take the horse then? Can you afford to move the horse to another stable in the area?

I would think long and hard before getting a companion horse that you have to board and has some sort of issue preventing him from being used.
Maybe Companion is the wrong word. He has been ridden in the past and may be able to again possibly. I am looking forward to handling him, teaching him to longe, teaching myself as well, and learning with him. I have seen people (such as another friend of mine) spend thousands (just spent 2K on a root canal) for a toy yorkie dog that is just a lap ornament. I guess because of love of the animal. Plus, I used to run a hot rod club that disbanded and I am really looking for somewhere to give me an outlet as opposed to just sitting around the house. So this seems like a way to learn and get into something I have an interest in. I am sure I would have access to other horses to ride and handle as well as he has several horses he trains and gives lessons on....
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post #13 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 12:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerry67 View Post
Maybe Companion is the wrong word. He has been ridden in the past and may be able to again possibly. I am looking forward to handling him, teaching him to longe, teaching myself as well, and learning with him. I have seen people (such as another friend of mine) spend thousands (just spent 2K on a root canal) for a toy yorkie dog that is just a lap ornament. I guess because of love of the animal. Plus, I used to run a hot rod club that disbanded and I am really looking for somewhere to give me an outlet as opposed to just sitting around the house. So this seems like a way to learn and get into something I have an interest in. I am sure I would have access to other horses to ride and handle as well as he has several horses he trains and gives lessons on....
Maybe you should just start with lessons since the owner gives lessons. Newbies should ALWAYS start with lessons, even at several different barns with several different styles of riding. How do you know what you want to do? Buying a horse because you're bored is very extreme and I certainly would not advise it.

Nothing wrong with learning on a horse with experience, but the horse may not be capable of what you want to do. May not be even able to lunge much at all for example.

A Companion horse is exactly like that Yorkie, but much more expensive to keep. The horse may not be able to do anything at all. And they don't even keep the bed warm (the Yorkie can do that at least, lol)
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post #14 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 01:00 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnitaAnne View Post
Maybe you should just start with lessons since the owner gives lessons. Newbies should ALWAYS start with lessons, even at several different barns with several different styles of riding. How do you know what you want to do? Buying a horse because you're bored is very extreme and I certainly would not advise it.

Nothing wrong with learning on a horse with experience, but the horse may not be capable of what you want to do. May not be even able to lunge much at all for example.

A Companion horse is exactly like that Yorkie, but much more expensive to keep. The horse may not be able to do anything at all. And they don't even keep the bed warm (the Yorkie can do that at least, lol)
Well, I am not doing it just because I am bored. I have been with my girl for four years and she has loads of experience and she has talked about getting back into it. We have ridden several times, gone to shows since we have been together and have talked about it for some time. This opportunity just presented itself so I am really considering. I had a shot at another horse a year ago but it was very young, had not been handled, and was very skittish, so we decided that was not the right move. This one may be.... Still going to get more info. And yes, I plan on taking lessons and getting pointers from experienced people. Luckily, we have several friends with a lot of experience. A buddy of mine was in the EXACT same position as me a couple years ago where his girl was into it and he had no experience. They both got a horse and he has nothing but positive to say about it. He has learned a ton and I hope to as well...I know everyone is giving advice but one thing I have noticed by watching videos and reading posts is how everyone says owning a horse is amazing, yet, it seems how they try to talk you out of it by scaring you with the costs etc.....I get it what they are saying and am listening to what they are trying to get across, but it is something I really want to do.
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post #15 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 01:07 PM
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I have 4 horses kept on my own farm and never figured up the costs until I considered taking in a boarder - which I didn't. It was surprising to me just what the cost of keeping a horse is.


Insurance -$200 - this is an addition to my farm policy because I have horses.
Hay - $750 - value of round bales I grow myself.
Feed - $920 - purchased ration balancer
Bedding - $250 - value of straw I grow myself
Wormer - $180 - rotational every 2 months
Labor - $3200 - ~1 hour per day at $8.75
Pasture - $1240 - value of land for other uses if it wasn't used for grazing
Utilities - $200
Depreciation and maintenance - $2300 buildings and fences. Horses have proven to be far more destructive than cattle.
Vet - $1000 - routine vaccines, rabies, and coggins, does not include emergencies
Farrier - $980
Dentist - $280


Total for 4 horses is $11,500 or $2875 per horse. Since they are kept at home these are not all out of pocket expenses but if I was boarding someone else's horse I would expect to be paid for my time, buildings, and land. Also note that I've included no truck and trailer expenses, no travel, no tack, and no shows.


I'll keep mine until the end of the their time because they have served me well but I wouldn't want to keep someone else's pasture ornament.
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post #16 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 01:32 PM
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I don't think anyone is trying to dissuade you from getting a horse....
I think many though are trying to answer you honestly with costs incurred based on a sound horse who is ride-able....

You are referring to taking on potentially a unsound horse, with a unknown issue that "might" improve and might not....
You need a vet....
You need a PPE, better known as a pre-purchase exam.
The expensive one with x-rays, flexion tests and blood-work...the whole works done as you are contemplating a horse who is a pasture puff now and a "maybe" being dangled in front of you.

There are many horses available for sale, for adoption...
Those are sound, usable and ride-able without having to wait and see if the horse comes around to sound.

You want to ride, to learn is fantastic and you are looking for a hobby....
Horses fit all of those things, it is how every single person started out.
Take some lessons, learn on some trusted mounts to be a safe rider and horse handler.
Enjoy the time spent with your friends, learn from them and their experiences...
Me, I would start with lessons, real lessons from a real instructor...then use those friends generosity to improve and practice your new skills on their horses...
After a few months of lessons where you can safely ride somewhat independently to walk, trot, turn and stop...then I would start a search for a nice quiet trail horse.
I would buy, yes spend money and buy a nice, sound horse who I can ride, enjoy and not have a money pit and not much pleasure....
You mentioned hot-rods....well they are a money-pit that you also understand standing sidelined when a unique part breaks and takes time to fabricate...now add flesh and blood healing time to that equation and you can understand the comparison..
Seriously, if you want to get involved it gets boring fast to stand on the sideline all the time because your horse is not ride-able, unsound or still recovering from a past injury that is ongoing...

Think very carefully about jumping in with a unsound, unusabe horse that needs $$$$ and no end currently in sight but a enticing...soon.

Best of luck.
...
jmo...

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post #17 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 01:35 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
I don't think anyone is trying to dissuade you from getting a horse....
I think many though are trying to answer you honestly with costs incurred based on a sound horse who is ride-able....

You are referring to taking on potentially a unsound horse, with a unknown issue that "might" improve and might not....
You need a vet....
You need a PPE, better known as a pre-purchase exam.
The expensive one with x-rays, flexion tests and blood-work...the whole works done as you are contemplating a horse who is a pasture puff now and a "maybe" being dangled in front of you.

There are many horses available for sale, for adoption...
Those are sound, usable and ride-able without having to wait and see if the horse comes around to sound.

You want to ride, to learn is fantastic and you are looking for a hobby....
Horses fit all of those things, it is how every single person started out.
Take some lessons, learn on some trusted mounts to be a safe rider and horse handler.
Enjoy the time spent with your friends, learn from them and their experiences...
Me, I would start with lessons, real lessons from a real instructor...then use those friends generosity to improve and practice your new skills on their horses...
After a few months of lessons where you can safely ride somewhat independently to walk, trot, turn and stop...then I would start a search for a nice quiet trail horse.
I would buy, yes spend money and buy a nice, sound horse who I can ride, enjoy and not have a money pit and not much pleasure....
You mentioned hot-rods....well they are a money-pit that you also understand standing sidelined when a unique part breaks and takes time to fabricate...now add flesh and blood healing time to that equation and you can understand the comparison..
Seriously, if you want to get involved it gets boring fast to stand on the sideline all the time because your horse is not ride-able, unsound or still recovering from a past injury that is ongoing...

Think very carefully about jumping in with a unsound, unusabe horse that needs $$$$ and no end currently in sight but a enticing...soon.

Best of luck.
...
jmo...

Thanks! Our friend is a real trainer & instructor. Thats how he makes his living.....

Cheers!
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post #18 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 01:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerry67 View Post
Thanks! Our friend is a real trainer & instructor. Thats how he makes his living.....

Cheers!
Then I don't quite understand the need for a post asking about costs if your friend is so knowledgeable and trusted....he would not take advantage or mislead you.
What he is telling you must be fact...right?

Yes, I am being facetious....

Seriously, do be careful and enlightened to the true horse-world.
Friends is friends, business is business and you need to still be protected and advised by a unbiased source {vet of your choice and paid for by you so you have accurate information!} about this potential prospect you are considering and the animals long-range forecast for sound and usable and not that money-pit.

I sincerely wish you the best of luck....
Bye.
...
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post #19 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 02:45 PM
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You're right, there is a cheap way to have horses. Most of the horses around here eat off a roundbale in the winter, graze in the summer, and are basically cared for like livestock. Strangely enough these horses seem to be just as happy and healthy as the ones sitting in a heated stall eating premium quality hay and grain three times a day.
A horse will most likely survive with sufficient nutrition, ample water, shade in the summer, shelter in the winter, and a hoof trim every couple months. A responsible horse owner ensures a dentist trip every couple years, an annual trip to the vet for vaccinations and a checkup, and dewormer every few months. That's the baseline. Obviously if injuries or illnesses come up, a trip to the doc is necessary.
Some horses are more just more accident prone than others. The sketchy part is you never know if you're going to get an accident prone horse or not. That's why everyone advises to be prepared.
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post #20 of 27 Old 12-21-2016, 09:21 PM
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If you live in a mild climate and have unlimited good grazing, are an experienced rider, and know how to trim feet and give shots and deworm, a young and healthy horse which goes barefoot could cost very little in upkeep. A few hundred dollars maybe.

It goes up from there. There is no ceiling whatsover.

If you are starting from scratch with no tack or gear, and no skills, and no place of your own already built and fenced, count on it being quite a bit more than average for the first few years.

My horse was 'free' if you don't include the training, riding lessons, saddle, all tack (I had nothing, not even a hoofpick), the trailer, the truck to pull the trailer, the supplements, the serious accident requiring emergency vet care .... and in many ways I have had a best-case scenario, with a suitable sound horse and a good teacher and a cheap boarding situation both near at hand.

Just budget at least four grand a year upkeep, not including major purchases or unforeseen events, and you'll be fine.
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