Newbie Wants A Horse - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 54 Old 06-20-2016, 10:27 PM Thread Starter
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Cool Newbie Wants A Horse

So, where do I begin? I am new to horses I have a miniature horse and a pony on my property that I care for but not financially responsible for. I brush, bathe, clean, feed, and so on. Being around them makes me feel like I am cut out to care for and maintain my own horse. I have taken a few riding lessons and still need some work in that area. ANYWAY! I went to meet this horse at a rescue center yesterday. His name is Bravo, he is deemed to be a perfect horse for beginners horse as he once worked at a summer camp for children (some with special needs). His description states:

Bravo
Hello my name is Bravo, I am a 15 year old, 15 hand Buckskin Dun, Quarter Horse Gelding. I used to be a kids camp horse so I am very friendly, love attention and have a puppy dog personality. I get along great with kids, adults, dogs, and other horses. I would make a good beginners or kids horse as I am very respectful and careful with my rider. I walk, trot, and, canter, with ease and striive to please with everything that is asked of me. I have mostly been a camp and trail riding horse but have plenty of get up and go and desire to go in other directions as well. I do not spook and am good with dogs, traffic , motorcycles, etc. I love to get out and go places and I ride, trailer, tie, clip, and have great ground manners. I have had lots of various natural training including Clinton Anderson Natural Horsemanship training.
Adoption Fee Only $2,800.00

Bravo let me ride him bareback, he was very gentle and a bit lazy.. The trainer said he was extremely docile and not spooky. The trainer went as far as tugging his tail, crawling underneath him, rubbing his legs and nose, standing on his back. Bravo didn't mind at all.

I spoke with a knowledgeable horse friend of mine and she said she could tell from the photo that his left front knee looked really bad and it was going to cost me major vet bills in the future. How should she know that from a photo I asked myself? he seemed solid when I met him and rode him.

She said that he was way too expensive at $2,800 especially because he doesn't come with papers. All the horses I have found to be priced right around there...

I guess what I am asking you guys is, in your opinion, DO YOU THINK I SHOULD BUY HIM?

If I do, I would have a my trainer come to my property and have her teach me riding lessons with him. Is that the way to go? or should I wait to purchase and continue my lessons? I am very much attached to Bravo since yesterday he is all I have been thinking about. I was up all night doing research because of him.


Forum will not let me post attachments but here is his posting, He is the 5th horse down. Can someone tell me if he has a bad left knee judging from his photos?

Southern California Horse Services with Natural Horsemanship

Also, I don't not plan to run him. I just want a family horse who doesn't mind nice slow walks on the beach with the occasional canter.
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post #2 of 54 Old 06-20-2016, 10:47 PM
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I can't tell you that you should buy this horse or not, but I can say that I can see what photo your friend is looking at and it's not his knee, it's the way the rope is hanging across it cutting part of his leg off in the photo making it look weird. I think for the most part Bravo looks like a pretty nice horse
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post #3 of 54 Old 06-20-2016, 10:50 PM
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Have a complete vet exam by YOUR vet. Some rescues are not honest because they need horses off their feed bill. Not all, before I get flamed, but some do some shady stuff. I would not rescue personally, if you want a horse, go buy a horse from someone who's selling one, with a full vet check regardless. Some rescues have rules about what you can and can't do with the horse and honestly, if I'm going to buy a horse, nobody gets to tell me what to do with it.
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post #4 of 54 Old 06-20-2016, 10:52 PM
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I think your next step, if you're serious about purchasing this horse, is getting a Pre-Purchase Exam done. :) That will give you a better idea of this horse's soundness.
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post #5 of 54 Old 06-20-2016, 10:58 PM
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I vote no. Don't buy a horse. Find somewhere to take lessons, or find someone to come to you and get some miles under your belt. Even if this horse is a saint and never steps wrong, you don't have the background knowledge on what to do if something out of the normal happens. If he loses weight, what would you feed? Do you know when a farrier is doing a good job? Do you know which dewormers to use and what time of year? Do you know the symptoms if he is colicing, foundering, choking, ect? I'd give it a year or two of taking lessons with a good instructor, then board the horse with them for another year or so, then you could think about having them on your own property.
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post #6 of 54 Old 06-20-2016, 11:29 PM
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^I agree that OP should be taking lessons, but obviously she knows how to care for a horse... As she's been caring for two equines already xD
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post #7 of 54 Old 06-20-2016, 11:35 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
I vote no. Don't buy a horse. Find somewhere to take lessons, or find someone to come to you and get some miles under your belt. Even if this horse is a saint and never steps wrong, you don't have the background knowledge on what to do if something out of the normal happens. If he loses weight, what would you feed? Do you know when a farrier is doing a good job? Do you know which dewormers to use and what time of year? Do you know the symptoms if he is colicing, foundering, choking, ect? I'd give it a year or two of taking lessons with a good instructor, then board the horse with them for another year or so, then you could think about having them on your own property.
Thank you for your insight these are all things I need to take into consideration. I am familiar with some of these as I am a Veterinary Technician and have taken courses on most of these topics. Nonetheless, these are all things I need to read up on and research as the last thing I want is to bring a horse home and have him suffer because of my ignorance. A part of me feels that I should continue with my lessons and forget about a horse for now.
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post #8 of 54 Old 06-20-2016, 11:38 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriF View Post
I can't tell you that you should buy this horse or not, but I can say that I can see what photo your friend is looking at and it's not his knee, it's the way the rope is hanging across it cutting part of his leg off in the photo making it look weird. I think for the most part Bravo looks like a pretty nice horse
Really glad you took the time to look at the photos! Thank you for clearing that up I didn't even see the rope
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post #9 of 54 Old 06-20-2016, 11:40 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Zexious View Post
^I agree that OP should be taking lessons, but obviously she knows how to care for a horse... As she's been caring for two equines already xD
Thank you for your comments, I do care for them though I wonder how much different it would be to have a 1000 pound horse compared to my little guys? and what is OP?

Last edited by Ahilpert; 06-20-2016 at 11:41 PM. Reason: what is OP?
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post #10 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 12:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ahilpert View Post
I guess what I am asking you guys is, in your opinion, DO YOU THINK I SHOULD BUY HIM?
My answer here is, NO. Here's why:

The rescues get these horses and , if they have papers the first thing they do is throw them in the trash. I don't EVER pay $2800 for a grade anything, and especially not a 15 y.o. grade something. I have very strong feelings about the ethics behind stripping a horse of its heritage.

You are not BUYING this horse. You will NEVER own him. You are "adopting" him. Rewrite the sentence so it tells the truth: The rescue has found a sucker who will take on all work, care and effort for a horse they don't own. The sucker will then pay all feed, training and vet bills, for a horse that remains the property of the rescue. Why would you want to do that?

If you want to buy a horse, depending on your skill and confidence, you could buy one from a local auction. You would own the horse and know as much about that one as you do the one you're looking at. Or you can buy one private party, with his papers and documentation of his care. Then you'd be spending money on a horse that can't be taken away from you on a whim.
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