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post #11 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 01:15 AM
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I came to the same conclusion about the rope hanging down by the knee before I read LoriF's comment. In the other photos he looks like he has normal knees. Obviously, I'd recommend a vet check pre-purchase exam so a vet could point out any issues you (or the rescue) may not know about. Then you can make an informed decision.

He sounds like and looks like a lovely first horse. Do you have questions about expenses, feed or care? The forum is a good place to ask.

I wouldn't steer any beginner away from a horse like that. Just be aware that horses can bring up many issues and questions, every horse has "something" that you will need to deal with. It may be a health issue such as allergies or arthritis, it may be difficulty with fitting saddles or tack, it may be hoof or soundness issues that crop up. It may be the horse needs lots of feed, or is difficult to keep from getting obese. This is normal, and I've come to believe that every horse owner is dealing with some issue...the horse goes too slow, the horse wants to go too fast. The horse spooks, the horse doesn't want to go out alone and leave his friends behind. So there is no such thing as a "perfect" horse.

But there are a lot of wonderful horse friends out there, as long as you can accept that they have issues just as all creatures do.
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post #12 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 01:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
You are not BUYING this horse. You will NEVER own him. You are "adopting" him. Rewrite the sentence so it tells the truth: The rescue has found a sucker who will take on all work, care and effort for a horse they don't own. The sucker will then pay all feed, training and vet bills, for a horse that remains the property of the rescue. Why would you want to do that?
I guess I missed this part...why wouldn't she own the horse? I haven't heard of a rescue that retains ownership of the horse...is that the case here? If so, then I would not adopt a horse either. I would allow someone "first option" if I wanted to sell a horse for some reason, but I would never buy a horse I didn't actually own. Around here, the word "adopt" is a fancy word for "buy." They like to use that word so you feel like you are rescuing the animal, but actually they are selling the horse.

$2,800 would be steep here also, with the caveat that horses so good for beginners can be hard to find. It would turn me off that a "rescue" was basically trying to add donation money into the price of the horse, because I don't believe someone adopting a horse from a rescue should be charged extra because the rescue took care of the horse. They supposedly are trying to help horses, and as part of that role they have to assume they will be paying to care for the animal until it is adopted. I believe the best rescues have a flat adoption rate for all horses regardless of usability or breed.
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post #13 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 01:31 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
My answer here is, NO. Here's why:

The rescues get these horses and , if they have papers the first thing they do is throw them in the trash. I don't EVER pay $2800 for a grade anything, and especially not a 15 y.o. grade something. I have very strong feelings about the ethics behind stripping a horse of its heritage.

You are not BUYING this horse. You will NEVER own him. You are "adopting" him. Rewrite the sentence so it tells the truth: The rescue has found a sucker who will take on all work, care and effort for a horse they don't own. The sucker will then pay all feed, training and vet bills, for a horse that remains the property of the rescue. Why would you want to do that?

If you want to buy a horse, depending on your skill and confidence, you could buy one from a local auction. You would own the horse and know as much about that one as you do the one you're looking at. Or you can buy one private party, with his papers and documentation of his care. Then you'd be spending money on a horse that can't be taken away from you on a whim.
Oh my goodness, I had no idea that rescues do this! I am in shock. I will need to do more research on the rescue center. As far as pricing are you implying that $2,800 is too much for a horse? A friend of mine thought that it was pretty steep... The rescue center coordinator did mention she had another horse for the same price with papers but I was not interested.. I would definitely not want him to be taken away from me so I will need to research this topic more. Thank you for responding. This is all very new to me and it is nice to have a group of knowledgable people to talk to.
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post #14 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 01:42 AM
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I'm leery of rescues because of my own recent bad experience with one, and also from many many horror stories I've heard. It seems like the only people who do any real rescuing are private owners who are not labeled as a rescue. They get a horse to help it, nurse it back to health, more often than not keep the horse. If they don't, they sell like they would any other horse and don't use a fancy 'adopt' term.

My recommendation is that you find a trainer to work with. I know its generic, I know everybody here says it, and on the flip side its true that you can end up with a bad trainer. But it is highly more likely that you will find an excellent teacher who will later lead you to an excellent horse.

My clients that I train/exercise for were fairly new to horses when they decided to go out and rescue three exracehorses off the slaughter truck. Very nice and kind of them. However, out of THREE large horses that have large feed bills, IMO only one of those horses is actually worth a darn as a riding horse (he is one of the best horses I have ever ridden though). Another has a permanent consistent lameness that only clears him for mild trail riding at a walk, and the last was apparently screwed up by a trainer they had. She may end up OK, but I don't know as I have not worked with her yet. However, I don't think any of these horses are ones that I would have picked for them for what they want to do, which is hobby trail riders that almost never get out to ride.

I'm sorry for the off topic hijack. The truly sad thing about our current world is that for every good horse, there are another ten out there that aren't worth a darn to most people so they don't want them. So its very easy to set yourself up as a 'rescue', take in some horses and feed them up, and then sell them to good caring people (lying about them in the process often times) often for a high dollar.

The main point: be careful whatever you decide. You would be much better off having a knowledgeable horse person that knows you and your abilities help you find a horse.
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post #15 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 01:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ahilpert View Post
Thank you for your insight these are all things I need to take into consideration. I am familiar with some of these as I am a Veterinary Technician and have taken courses on most of these topics. Nonetheless, these are all things I need to read up on and research as the last thing I want is to bring a horse home and have him suffer because of my ignorance. A part of me feels that I should continue with my lessons and forget about a horse for now.
I may be being a little critical, but in you other thread you described yourself as completely green, having just recently aqured both of your ponies. Plus you refered to the halter as "harness and leash".
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post #16 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 02:14 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
I may be being a little critical, but in you other thread you described yourself as completely green, having just recently aqured both of your ponies. Plus you refered to the halter as "harness and leash".
Yes, I am completely green. Your response is just as important to me as the rest and I really appreciate your help.
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post #17 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 02:23 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
I came to the same conclusion about the rope hanging down by the knee before I read LoriF's comment. In the other photos he looks like he has normal knees. Obviously, I'd recommend a vet check pre-purchase exam so a vet could point out any issues you (or the rescue) may not know about. Then you can make an informed decision.

He sounds like and looks like a lovely first horse. Do you have questions about expenses, feed or care? The forum is a good place to ask.

I wouldn't steer any beginner away from a horse like that. Just be aware that horses can bring up many issues and questions, every horse has "something" that you will need to deal with. It may be a health issue such as allergies or arthritis, it may be difficulty with fitting saddles or tack, it may be hoof or soundness issues that crop up. It may be the horse needs lots of feed, or is difficult to keep from getting obese. This is normal, and I've come to believe that every horse owner is dealing with some issue...the horse goes too slow, the horse wants to go too fast. The horse spooks, the horse doesn't want to go out alone and leave his friends behind. So there is no such thing as a "perfect" horse.

But there are a lot of wonderful horse friends out there, as long as you can accept that they have issues just as all creatures do.
Thank you for your response, I have done some calculating and have found that it would cost me around $160 per month on feed alone.. Does this sound about right to you? The rescue feeds him alfa alfa at night and timothy in the morning.. Also, you mentioned that $2,800 is steep for a horse? I live in Southern CA and I think they are expensive here because not too many people have them in the area. Do you think that is why he is expensive? What does Caveat mean?
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post #18 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 02:28 AM
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OP is 'forum talk' for "original poster." :)

In regards to your last question, each horse is an individual and their care will vary.
It sounds like you have knowledgable people who can help you out? Is this true?

@Dreamcatcher Arabians -- I'm surprised at you. I can't think of worse advice to give someone new to the horse industry than to go to an auction. OP will have no idea what they're looking at; no idea of what signs to avoid; little to no time spent with the horse.
Please, OP, do not do this.

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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post #19 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 02:37 AM
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I am very very new to horses. You know more than I do about them. You've at least been around them in the past 20 years. I'm hoping to buy two of them in a few years from now. I'm using those years before then to learn as much as I can. I'm taking riding lessons, I'm talking to my vet, buying DVDs, renting books, talking to other horse owners, talking to trainers, learning about breed standards, anything and everything I can get my hands on. For me, it would be the worst thing ever to turn into one of those nightmare owners that everyone here hates. I don't want to do that. I don't want to be that. No where near it. And I know darn well that even after I study for a few years the learning is never ending. I'll still have a long way to go. The question I plan on asking myself once I get there is, "Am I going to be able to give this animal the best possible life I can? One that it truly deserves."

On top of that I have to do the financial planning to keep two of these animals. Emergency funds for surgeries. The added insurance for myself, my family, and anyone else who wonders onto my property. Added life insurance in case something really tragic goes wrong. I have to plan for feed, shelter, everything, down to the last detail. And then leave myself a LOT of wiggle room for things that always eventually go wrong. I have to calculate for illnesses in the family. What if I get ill? Who takes care of the horse then when I can't. What if expenses within my family rise? Have I prepared my family well enough for that? I have to consider things outside the spectrum of just buying a horse before I buy the horse. It might be over kill to some people's way of thinking. But living my Murphy's Law, anything that can go wrong will go wrong, I am just the type of person who plans ahead to avoid those types of situations. Then I leave myself room to squirm out of them and come out smelling like a rose... lol

As for the adoption thing, Dream has a point. But you can call those people and ask about this papers. If they start to give you a song and dance about his paper work, run. Who knows, you might actually have found an adoption place that has some scruples. I doubt it. I've already ran into a lot of ugly lately when doing my homework. My faith in the 'goodness of others' at these adoption places is a bit shaken at the moment... There's one place that takes a ton of money from people. They take 'donations so that they can rescue a horse,' and end up getting a ton of money. They spend next to nothing adopting the horse, even less fixing the poor beast up and training it, then they sell it to the highest bidder and pocket the rest. Yeah some charity. I am definitely starting to like private owners a lot more than some of these 'good hearted cemeritans'. I want to believe that there are a few out there that are on the up and up. Not found one yet. But hoping..

Don't fall in love with the first horse you see. Shop around. Boy I can't tell you how much wisdom I gained following that advise.
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Last edited by Kyleen Drake; 06-21-2016 at 02:43 AM.
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post #20 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 02:37 AM
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My wise old mother had a saying "What you want and what you get are often two very different things."

Personally I do not think you are experienced enough to have a horse that you intend to ride on your own. Going to a place and riding a horse and it does all that you ask is one thing, recognising that the horse is taking advantage of you and knowing how to correct it is another.

The price seems rather high for an older horse and although this place classes itself as a rescue means diddly squat, if something goes wrong with the horse will they take it back?

Most of these rescues are nothing but horse dealers under another name. I bought many horses at auction, some would have ended up in the food chain but I never thought of them as rescues nor classed myself as a saviour, I was a horse dealer plain and simple.

Get a lot more hours under instruction and then think about your own horse.
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