Newbie Wants A Horse - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 12:57 PM
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@Kyleen Drake -- Dreamcatcher's post did not say 'go to an auction to learn.' I wouldn't have even responded to that. People choose to immerse themselves in the horse industry and learn in different ways. But the post says 'buy [a horse] from a local auction.'

@Dreamcatcher Arabians -- But based on what's been posted I feel like we have a relatively firm understanding of the skill and confidence level of OP? I maintain that purchasing from an auction is not appropriate in this situation. (again, your post said to buy from not just attend)

In my area (I have never attended an auction in OK) there are two types of auctions: breed auctions and local auctions. The former are high dollar and mostly for breeders and competitors, the latter are 'throw away' horses that have been hard to sell for one reason or another. Mental soundness, physical soundness, sour attitude, etcetc. I'm sure there are things in-between these two extremes, they're just what I've seen.

As far rescues... eh.
I hear and agree with much of what's being posted.

OP, if you're still around, it sounds like you've got the care part down.
Have you considered lessons? I know other posters have suggested this, too.
That'll give you a better understanding of what you should be looking for. Too, you can work with a trainer. It's great to have an extra set of eyes and ears--not to mention their expertise.
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The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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post #32 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 01:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zexious View Post
@Kyleen Drake -- Dreamcatcher's post did not say 'go to an auction to learn.' I wouldn't have even responded to that. People choose to immerse themselves in the horse industry and learn in different ways. But the post says 'buy [a horse] from a local auction.'

@Dreamcatcher Arabians -- But based on what's been posted I feel like we have a relatively firm understanding of the skill and confidence level of OP? I maintain that purchasing from an auction is not appropriate in this situation. (again, your post said to buy from not just attend)

In my area (I have never attended an auction in OK) there are two types of auctions: breed auctions and local auctions. The former are high dollar and mostly for breeders and competitors, the latter are 'throw away' horses that have been hard to sell for one reason or another. Mental soundness, physical soundness, sour attitude, etcetc. I'm sure there are things in-between these two extremes, they're just what I've seen.

As far rescues... eh.
I hear and agree with much of what's being posted.

OP, if you're still around, it sounds like you've got the care part down.
Have you considered lessons? I know other posters have suggested this, too.
That'll give you a better understanding of what you should be looking for. Too, you can work with a trainer. It's great to have an extra set of eyes and ears--not to mention their expertise.

I also only suggested buying if the OP had the SKILL and CONFIDENCE to do so. Otherwise, no, she/he shouldn't buy. I haven't paid any mind to other threads where the skill level may have been mentioned, I only know what was in this thread and early on, no skill level was mentioned. Now that the OP has stated they're green, by all means don't buy at an auction, but do go an learn. The lower end the better, that's where you'll really start to see some of the horses that will show up in the next weeks and months at the local rescues, being touted as the "best beginner, child safe mount ever".
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post #33 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 01:23 PM
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Join Date: May 2016
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I seen some horses at that auction that would have a lot of people here salivating. They were just so beautiful! Like out of a horse magazine. But beauty is not everything. After you buy a horse from auction, even with someone with you that has an eye for it, it's still a gamble on what you're actually getting. You still have to worry about its health. Still have to worry about its training. A really good horse trainer can cost $500 a month or more. And the horse could need trained for over six months or more. You won't know until after you have bought it! It's just one of the risks you take when going to auction. If it is an acceptable risk for you, you can afford it, go for it.. But there is risks in everything when buying a horse, no matter how you do it. I think everyone here just really wants you to learn all the warning signs. Know what the risks are for each way of obtaining a horse, and make a wise choice that suits you. Everyone here, including me, is a bit protective of you, you sound green like I am. They don't want to see you hurt or taken advantage of. Neither do I. Wish you the best in your choices once you've learned what all those options and consequences are.
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The only thing evil needs to thrive, is for good men to do nothing. - Edmond Burke

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post #34 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 03:22 PM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greentree View Post
Yes, rescue has become euphemism for "(possibly) tax advantaged horse trader" . Their contracts are absolutely ridiculous. They push green animals on raw beginners, and charge exorbitant "adoption fees", because so many people want to own "a rescue".

I am certain there are some decent rescues, but I have yet to find one.
I don't want to "own a rescue" I am not deliberately searching for a horse to rescue. I am simply looking for a beginner friendly horse and this discussion has turned into a discussion about adopting; When it was meant for me to see if you think I am ready to own my own horse. I wanted to see what you guys thought about Bravo and if you thought he would be a good fit for me..
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post #35 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Location: California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zexious View Post
@Kyleen Drake -- Dreamcatcher's post did not say 'go to an auction to learn.' I wouldn't have even responded to that. People choose to immerse themselves in the horse industry and learn in different ways. But the post says 'buy [a horse] from a local auction.'

@Dreamcatcher Arabians -- But based on what's been posted I feel like we have a relatively firm understanding of the skill and confidence level of OP? I maintain that purchasing from an auction is not appropriate in this situation. (again, your post said to buy from not just attend)

In my area (I have never attended an auction in OK) there are two types of auctions: breed auctions and local auctions. The former are high dollar and mostly for breeders and competitors, the latter are 'throw away' horses that have been hard to sell for one reason or another. Mental soundness, physical soundness, sour attitude, etcetc. I'm sure there are things in-between these two extremes, they're just what I've seen.

As far rescues... eh.
I hear and agree with much of what's being posted.

OP, if you're still around, it sounds like you've got the care part down.
Have you considered lessons? I know other posters have suggested this, too.
That'll give you a better understanding of what you should be looking for. Too, you can work with a trainer. It's great to have an extra set of eyes and ears--not to mention their expertise.
I am still here, I have been taking some lessons but I am still learning. What do you guys think about me purchasing Bravo and having lessons on my property? Also, I live in Southern, CA and I do not think we have horse auctions around here...
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post #36 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 03:33 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reiningcatsanddogs View Post
There are several things for you to consider, especially since it appears you would be keeping your horse at home rather than at a boarding facility. You will not have some of the “built ins” that you would as a boarder.

One is your experience level which several people have already brought up. Second is your support system. Third is your resources. I’ll go over each one.

Experience level: being able to recognize a little issue before it becomes a big one, knowing when and how to correct it both in a way that is understood and is fair to the horse is important. It is something learned with time and experience. I would suggest taking lessons that include horsemanship. Some places still have riders show up for a lesson, mount up, ride and get off and go home. That would not be a place for you to be. They teach you to ride, but not really how to deal with owning a horse.

Instead look for an instructor that will take you through everything from catching to lunging, to grooming, to saddling up, to recognizing health problems, to proper leading, dealing with ground manners…the whole kit n’ caboodle. A bonus would be an instructor/trainer willing to come out to your property and work with both you and your horse.

Support system: Farrier, vet, instructor/horse knowledgeable friend you can call with little problems or questions at no extra charge. The no extra charge thing is important, because you will be more likely to ask for guidance before something becomes a huge issue.

Another thing to consider is if you want to take a vacation even a short one, do you have someone with horse experience that can come take care of your horses for you? Since you already have the two minis I assume you do, but I thought I’d throw that in there anyway.

Resources: Money, Time, Structures, Transportation
If your horse becomes seriously ill, such as a colic that cannot be remedied in the field, you will need a way to transport the horse to a facility. Nothing is worse than having a horse who is seriously ill and finding yourself scrambling at two a.m. to beg a trailer to take them to a hospital! This will mean a trailer and a truck to pull it or at least easy, quick access to one. One thing I never thought of until a wild fire was threatening our area was the need to evacuate. At that time, even the trailers I might have had access to would have been needed by their owners, so if I had to rely upon a borrowed trailer, I would have been stuck.

If you have a horse who is injured and needs confinement they will need a stall. If you live in a place with harsh weather either hot or cold, shade, windbreaks and shelter will be needed.

Can you on short notice take off work if say in the morning you come down to find your horse has injured himself and requires veterinary attention, but the mobile vet can’t come until noon or later? If that is going to cause a big problem with work then that would be something to consider. The other thing to realize is that since your horses are at home, you will be the only person who might notice that something is just not right with the horse(s). If you are gone more than you are home, then your chances of catching a medical problem early goes down quite a bit.

Horses get expensive especially when you are just starting out. It seems like there is always something you need until you have built up a rather impressive arsenal over the years. Every month it seems like you need something; supplements, products for hoof condition, new fly control measures. In addition to trailers, shelters, feed, hay, tack and farrier care upon everything else, they are accident prone. Do you have an emergency fund set up to cover the expense of a three-day (or longer) hospital stay?


I don’t want to scare you off. It’s not impossible, obviously thousands of people manage to do it every day, but horse ownership, especially keeping them at home, can be deceptively complicated!
Loved your post! this is extremely eye opening and definitely what I needed to hear.
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Last edited by Reiningcatsanddogs; 06-21-2016 at 05:14 PM.
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post #37 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 03:43 PM
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Join Date: May 2016
Location: Oklahoma
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You're not hearing us I'm afraid. Bravo is a no go, he would be a horrible idea. You're going to go get him, fall in love with him, then soon as you're attached to him the adoption center is probably going to yank him away from you for petty reasons, have full legal rights to do so, you won't get a dime of your money back because you signed the contract, and you'll be left heartbroken, $3,000 in the hole, and no horse!

PLEASE please PLEASE re-read what everyone is trying to tell you! And try to soak in why they are giving you alternate routes to take to obtaining a horse, without these nightmares!
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The only thing evil needs to thrive, is for good men to do nothing. - Edmond Burke

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post #38 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 03:58 PM
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Since you're lessoning, why don't you discuss this with your trainer? c:
They will almost always provide better information than us on HF, simply because we don't know you, this organization you're wanting to deal with, or your situation.

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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post #39 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 04:00 PM
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Petaluma Livestock Auction Yard Inc Petaluma CA
84 Corona Rd, Petaluma, CA 94952
(707) 763-0893

this is just one in 20 I found in a 3 minute online search...

The only thing evil needs to thrive, is for good men to do nothing. - Edmond Burke

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post #40 of 54 Old 06-21-2016, 04:10 PM
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In the OP's original link the place with Bravo has him listed under 'sale horses'. So maybe, although they do rescue they sell horses too? If so then maybe no rescue contract is involved.
Still, buying a horse for a first time buyer should involve someone very experienced & a vet.
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