Options for dealing with uveitis - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 17 Old 03-19-2019, 12:50 PM
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That's an excellent point- if her vision is compromised horses do MUCH better with no sight then partial sight, being prey animals all the shadows and sudden movements are 1000% scarier then being able to see. While we joke about horses spooking at leaves I know a steady eddy mare who was retired after rearing and flipping on her owner and breaking her hip. She was partially blind and just couldn't handle it. They don't know if the leaf was a leaf or a bear and a horses instinct is to react. Young beautiful horse, the owner felt badly having her sit so she eventually tried driving her (..!!) well she did do fairly well with the professional but I think the first time the owner took over they had a really bad wreck, no major injuries but it's safe to say the mare is retired for good now.

A fully blind horse won't have to worry about a leaf because they use their nose and ears to know there are no bears around vs just having that "react" instinct with sudden movements and such. (And this works on one side or both sides).
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post #12 of 17 Old 03-19-2019, 02:39 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone for your input. The owner texted me today informing me she isn’t eating her mash, so they are going to act quickly to get that appointment and probably have it removed. I understand that it would be a lot more difficult if we had to have something like that done and that horses don’t have such attachments. Can you say anthropomorphic? Well they are pretty certain that is what is going to have to be done, I just didn’t want for such an extreme measure to have to be taken. She will definitely be much more comfortable afterward, which is certainly most important.
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post #13 of 17 Old 03-19-2019, 05:59 PM
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Well eating her mash is obviously separate from her eye so a) she's not feeling well or b) pain meds are upsetting her stomach (or unrelated).

Keep us posted.

Curious, do you know if she has vision in that eye? If she's already blind she doesn't even have any transition period. Just recovery from the surgery itself.
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post #14 of 17 Old 03-22-2019, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by chiaronate View Post
. She will definitely be much more comfortable afterward, which is certainly most important.

Yup. Ask any human friend who has had a bout of uveitis/iritis. Very painful and a constant ache at all times.
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post #15 of 17 Old 03-23-2019, 02:36 AM
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there is a mare at our barn with this condition. Today, out on a ride, she bolted with her rider. Never done that before. I wonder if the pain is making her 'crazy' . .



BTW, this is the prettiest photo:

@Cedar & Salty
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post #16 of 17 Old 03-23-2019, 01:34 PM
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there is a mare at our barn with this condition. Today, out on a ride, she bolted with her rider. Never done that before. I wonder if the pain is making her 'crazy' . .



BTW, this is the prettiest photo:
It is! I love our vet and his staff. Salty was the very first surgical patient at their brand new facility last year.

We got to watch the surgery. I had to leave in the middle to run an errand. I snuck back in very quietly. His head was still draped and the surgeon was closing up. I whispered something to my husband, and when Salty heard my voice, his head came up and his ears moved to follow me. We all laughed -- that's when I knew he was truly mine!

In some ways, I think his surgery and recovery was a very positive thing. As a new owner, I was pushed way outside my comfort zone caring for a horse that I didn't know very well. Now I know that he didn't have a consistently safe and kind past, so he had to learn to trust me at a time where he had to feel very vulnerable.
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post #17 of 17 Old 03-25-2019, 02:33 AM Thread Starter
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Well I found out it wasn’t the uveitis causing her to not eat, but an unusually high amount of parasites? They are not sure about what caused it, whether it be from the medication that she has been using on and off for a few years, or alfalfa cubes that have recently been fed to her that are quite old, but have not affected the other two horses that ate them, or possibly the source of the water that the other two horses also drank? They are going to throw out the alfalfa cubes and have the water tested. She is doing much better now and should be coming home soon. They are going to be monitoring the uveitis and she still has an appointment with the optometrist on April 17.
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