A pre-horse question (or 10) - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 59Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 02:18 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: New England
Posts: 12,001
• Horses: 3
No local help, but a good riding barn should cover all that stuff. On top of that lots of research and a good mentor are invaluable!!

I would try to find a small local barn that will take you on as a trainee in exchange for help.

And water is ALWAYS free choice. Esp in the desert :)

Unfortunately that is a LOT to learn and a LOT of work in a short period of time. Riding is the easy part! I think hands on assistance (having a neighbor to call for ex) is invaluable, you will need it a lot, and often times it's noticing things BEFORE they happen that is key. A lot of it you just have to learn as you go but you should know basic first aid, horse style, and routine things and while I applaud your goal it sounds like you don't have a clue (atm!)

And while great you get animals horses are NOTHING like dogs. At all.

And of course a great forum is very helpful XD Good luck!

Oh- and get a nice easy horse that you will appreciate. Something small and sturdy and comfortable with a nice chill "been there done that" personality. Don't rush into things.
Change and Prairie like this.
Yogiwick is offline  
post #12 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 02:25 AM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,635
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider View Post
But don't settle for a horse that will only go out with another horse, what fun is that? What if you have no one to ride with that day? Gee, I can't go riding because my horse won't go out alone!
Absolutely, I just mentioned it because a beginner or a novice may not be aware of the fact that it is not a given that all horses can do it - it really isn't something that would have crossed my mind to even ask before I started going out on my own. There are some really shady people out there (at least around here).
Horsef is offline  
post #13 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 02:38 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Arizona
Posts: 6,664
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsef View Post
Absolutely, I just mentioned it because a beginner or a novice may not be aware of the fact that it is not a given that all horses can do it - it really isn't something that would have crossed my mind to even ask before I started going out on my own. There are some really shady people out there (at least around here).
I agree, that's an important thing to point out. I just didn't want the OP to think it was normal (or to settle) for a horse that wouldn't ride out by itself. Because it's not too much to ask.

I have a green horse now and I'm really only just starting to learn how much I can influence his behavior by MY behavior and riding skills. But it's been 20 years in the making, for me to be able to work with and train a green horse. I was blissfully unaware of just how good my already-trained horses were and how much they were taking care of me. Because I wasn't really supporting them emotionally on the trail. They were supporting me. Now I'm learning how to support the horse. But I tell you, I've been blessed with a few GREAT horses over the years that really took good care of me.

They are out there. You just have to find them.
Yogiwick, Change, Horsef and 1 others like this.
trailhorserider is offline  
post #14 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 02:39 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 6
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoTap View Post
A good place to start would be to volunteer at a rescue or therapeutic riding center in addition to your lessons as you can learn quite a lot by just being around the barn and willing to put in a helping hand, especially since you want to learn the finer details.
Actually, I have a little experience in that area. My son has cerebral palsy and was involved in a hippotherapy program. I didn't get to care for the horses but did get pressed into service as a side-walker.

A bit off topic: the center where the therapy horses were stabled was also used by the NYC mounted Park Patrol. One female parkie was maybe 5 feet tall and under 100 pounds. Her mount was a palomino Clydesdale that was big enough to show movies on his flanks. Everybody looked when they went by. The horse was as gentle as she was big, though. They would have loved to use her in the program, but they needed steeds a bit closer to the ground.
Change likes this.
Falling up is offline  
post #15 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 02:56 AM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,635
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider View Post
I have a green horse now and I'm really only just starting to learn how much I can influence his behavior by MY behavior and riding skills.
Here is me, novice rider out on a trail on my own with an experienced but cheeky horse three years ago:

Me: ...
Horse: Hm?
Me: ...
Horse: What is that?
Me: ...
Horse: She doesn't know! OMG, WE ARE GOING TO DYE! It's a BLADE of grass! It's a blade of GRASSSSS! That's it, I'm out of here.
Me: ---thunk--- falls off, gets up, limps back.
Horse: I'm running!
Horse: Why am I running?
Horse: Oh, look, a blade of grass! I'm gonna eat it.

Same horse, a couple of weeks ago:

Me: ...
Horse: Hm?
Me: Shudup.
Horse: Ok.

I don't want to scare OP, I ride in a very non-horsey country and I rode some reeeeeally unsuitable horses.
tinyliny, Dustbunny, Eole and 2 others like this.
Horsef is offline  
post #16 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 03:03 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 6
• Horses: 0
Thanks for all the good advice. I will have researched this thing to death before long and hope to get considerable practical experience before making final decisions. I do know that I would be looking for a fully trained animal that's not even a little green. Even though I'm not interested in training up a green horse, I'd want to at least understand the basics of how that gets done. I know some dogs (and even some people) will get it their heads that something they don't understand is going to kill them. People can usually be reasoned out of their fears but animals have to have things demonstrated in a way they can understand. My best bet is to get one that's already done everything I'd reasonably expect I'd ask him to do.

I will probably shoot out a couple of PMs after I've had some sleep.
Falling up is offline  
post #17 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 03:10 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 6
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsef View Post
I don't want to scare OP, I ride in a very non-horsey country and I rode some reeeeeally unsuitable horses.
I got on a really unsuitable horse once. I way overstated my riding ability to impress a young lady (pretty sure I did, but not in the way i'd hoped) and was given a "spirited" mount to ride. I walked away without injury, but I learned the lesson that Dirty Harry tried to impart about a man knowing his limitations.
Change and mred like this.
Falling up is offline  
post #18 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 03:19 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: New England
Posts: 12,001
• Horses: 3
Oh and youtube channels and videos and stuff- don't count for a darn thing at this point. Learn things in person and if you need help get help in person (and have them show you, not just fix it).

There are so many things, like putting on a saddle. Well you need to position it right, and do the girth up nice and snug, but not enough to make the horse hate you, not too hard, but while you're at it you need to (subconciously is fine, and I promise you WILL get to that point someday) evaluate the fit, look for anything awry (a worn bit that could snap, a burr on the saddle pad) watch your horses reaction to make sure nothing's bothering them about it, etc. All tiny little details that even the best rider doesn't often do conciously (at least not daily) but would definitely notice if something was "off". It's really just experience.

I think it's great that you're willing to board as you learn, you definitely have the right approach and that's all that's needed! Do keep in mind regarding instructions, ALL things in the horse world are NOT created equal!! There may be more than one way to do something, but there is also a definite right and wrong way. I worked at a lesson barn that was pretty scary. I also saw someone with lots of money and less sense buy 3 horses off the bat as a complete novice, needless to say that went south. But you sound like a practical person! Common sense and listening to your gut goes a long way.
JCnGrace and Change like this.
Yogiwick is offline  
post #19 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 07:16 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: SW PA
Posts: 2,285
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Falling up View Post
My plan would to buy when I get out west and keep the animal in a full-board situation, until I'm ready to take him home. If ever. It may just suit my needs to stay with a full service stable. I'd need to know a lot more than I do to to make that choice.




The research I've do so far has shown me that. It's kind of daunting when you first start learning about something to find out how much you don't know, that you need to know. I'm still in the "learning how much I don't know" phase. I do know I need an older animal with a bomb-proof temperament.
I have been around horse most of my life and I am still in the phase of learning what I don't know.....lolol

That is part of the enjoyment of horses for me; always learning if you are willing to learn.
sarahfromsc is offline  
post #20 of 21 Old 10-08-2016, 07:21 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 9,100
• Horses: 0
Hello and welcome to the forum!

You have received a lot of great advice!

My offerings area to invite you to the over 60's thread

https://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk...abouts-655873/

And we also have an Over 50's thread in the same "Horse Talk" section.

https://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk...r-50-a-213370/

If you are a reader and since your actual horse endeavors are a ways down the road, you might find Mark Rashid's books an interesting read. I have 3-4 of them. I bought them on EBay.

Home

One of my favorite older books is "A Good Horse Is Never A Bad Color". "Ranch Horse" is about his heart horse that he had for many years.

I like him a lot because:

1. His principles remind me of my grandfather.

2. He teaches in anecdotal form rather than academic and often leaves the reader to figure something out for themselves -- he gives the reader everything they need to come to a conclusion.

3. From an old retired lady's perspective, it also doesn't hurt that he looks a lot like the actor, Sam Elliott, lollol

I hope you will join us and participate - if you read about folks experiences long enough, something is going to rub off, lollol
tinyliny, Dustbunny, Eole and 2 others like this.

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
walkinthewalk is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pre-Weaning Foal Purchase Contract Question countryryder Horse Talk 2 07-15-2015 10:33 AM
PRE Color Question ~*~anebel~*~ Horse Colors and Genetics 17 05-17-2015 11:12 PM
PRE Andalusian question EFM Horse Breeds 1 10-19-2014 08:15 PM
Question about pre-purchase trial period tx6756 Horse Law 6 10-11-2011 11:47 AM
Jumping Horse Pre-Purchase hotreddun Horse Health 6 04-01-2009 10:58 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome