Purchasing a horse- how old is too old? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 21 Old 04-15-2016, 11:14 AM
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I think this age is totally suitable--she'll still have several years of solid riding left, provided all necessary maintenance is done c:
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post #12 of 21 Old 04-15-2016, 06:05 PM
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It's the perfect age! We just bought a 15 yr old horse last fall for our then 10 year old daughter. The horse is now 16 and our daughter is 11. He's lovely for her and if anything, has more energy than she really requires (she's been riding since she was 6). So a fairly similar situation.

The only thing I would say is that the most important thing is that the horse has excellent ground manners so she can handle it confidently. Our daughter wanted a jumper so we found her one. And he is a real doll - I can handle him easily. But sometimes he is a bit much for her. So our next horse - yes, we are getting a second one - will be the quiet, totally dead-broke beginner type.

Will you be keeping this horse at home or will he be boarded? Will she continue lessons on it? I think that's pretty important because there is an adjustment period and they are still children, after all.

Congrats and tell us if you decide to purchase this horse!
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post #13 of 21 Old 04-15-2016, 06:31 PM
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My big guy will turn 19 next month. In strength, endurance, speed, or by any other measure he performs like he did when he was 6. The only difference is in how much better he behaves.

Many young girls have an intense interest in horses that may only last a few years. The surest way to satisfy that interest is with an older horse. My horse was too young and my training ability too feeble and I missed the window with my own daughter; one of many parental regrets.

My own love of horses was cultivated in childhood riding a retired roping horse in his late teens. I rode him bareback in the town parade and it never occurred to me that might not be something you would want to try on any horse. I always advise parents in your situation to look for a horse around 20 years old. 17 is definitely not too old.
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post #14 of 21 Old 04-16-2016, 11:46 AM
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As long as the horse is sound and in good health, it is a perfect age. We have a boarder that is a thirty three year old gelding who is perfectly sound with no health issues and certainly still capable of moderate work.
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post #15 of 21 Old 04-16-2016, 01:52 PM
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The first horse I bought for my daughters was 27. They learned to rope on her, and so did several others. She wasn't used for roping the last two years we had her, but did give lots of first rides to children.

We had her 5 years.
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post #16 of 21 Old 04-16-2016, 02:24 PM
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We bought dd's mare three years ago - she is now 26, best purchase ever. She has taught dd everything she knows - how to have soft hands, a quiet seat and good legs. She carried dd around the show ring and won a few dozen rosettes and a championship in the 3/4 shows we did over the space of 2 years. she is exactly what dd, a nervous rider, needed - age, experience and the ability to give her confidence and lifelong memories. The best 300 I ever spent and to be honest, I can't thank the pony enough for what she has done for our family.... Yet it's amazing how many people scoffed at the idea of a 20something being sold and how many people told us we were doing it wrong.

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post #17 of 21 Old 04-16-2016, 05:05 PM
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I honestly think older horses are the way to go for beginners and younger children. I cringe when I hear about parents buying their 10 yr old a 4 yr old to learn on. There's someone at my barn that got an unbroke 2 year old horse for her 11 yr old daughter that just had her very first riding lesson a month ago! My trainer tried to tell her this was a bad idea, but she had it in her head that the two of them could grow together. :-/ It could be years before this horse is even suitable for a beginner rider, if at all.

As far as I'm concerned, older horses with solid temperament that have been there-done that and are still healthy are worth their weight in gold.
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post #18 of 21 Old 04-16-2016, 07:57 PM
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I was 12 years old when my parents bought me a 17 year old mare. I used her for pleasure riding, trail work, and light ranch work and even some team penning up through high school. She became semi-retired when I went off to college and occasionally carried the little nieces and nephews. She was so great with the littles that I turned down several offers to buy her. When I was 25 and she was 30, I held her head and cried when the vet put her down due to cancer. Definitely one of the best purchases my parents ever made.
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post #19 of 21 Old 04-16-2016, 11:46 PM
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I don't have kids myself but if I did I wouldn't want to start them on a horse that's much younger than that unless I knew the horse real well (as in one of my own). As been already mentioned, horses that age are seasoned and not likely to pull silly stuff that young horses are prone to do.
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post #20 of 21 Old 04-17-2016, 09:45 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
It's the perfect age! We just bought a 15 yr old horse last fall for our then 10 year old daughter. The horse is now 16 and our daughter is 11. He's lovely for her and if anything, has more energy than she really requires (she's been riding since she was 6). So a fairly similar situation.

The only thing I would say is that the most important thing is that the horse has excellent ground manners so she can handle it confidently. Our daughter wanted a jumper so we found her one. And he is a real doll - I can handle him easily. But sometimes he is a bit much for her. So our next horse - yes, we are getting a second one - will be the quiet, totally dead-broke beginner type.

Will you be keeping this horse at home or will he be boarded? Will she continue lessons on it? I think that's pretty important because there is an adjustment period and they are still children, after all.

Congrats and tell us if you decide to purchase this horse!
Thanks! The horse will live at the home of my aunt and uncle who have acerage. My daughter will attend pony club and have lessons also :)
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