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post #1 of 12 Old 11-08-2015, 03:34 PM Thread Starter
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What is a good horse for beginner riders to use at lessons? I haven't convinced my Dad yet about lessons, but I'm gathering information on horses so I can show my dad that I'm responsible enough and is serious about horse riding.
At the farm I might go to they have a friesian horse. Are friesians good to ride at lessons for beginners?
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post #2 of 12 Old 11-08-2015, 03:38 PM
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It's not the breed, it's the training. Any breed can be a suitable lesson horse if it has the correct training and experience.

Friesians, however, tend to have very big movement, so they may not be suitable for an absolute beginner because it might make it difficult to find your balance.
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post #3 of 12 Old 11-08-2015, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
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Thank You!
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post #4 of 12 Old 11-08-2015, 03:53 PM
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When riding at a lesson barn, especially as a beginner, you (the student) do not get to chose your horse for the lessons. The qualified instructor will do that. I am not sure if you have visiting this particular barn before, or?? Either way, simply because there is a friesian on the property does in no way mean that you will get to ride the horse - the horse could belong to a boarder, or perhaps the trainer's personal horse, or possibly the horse is retired and no longer ridden. Around here, there are a couple friesian breeders, but those are not lesson barns. Lesson barns around here will generally have a mix of breeds (no friesians).

Whether or not a horse is a good mount for a beginner is all in the training and the horse's temperment to begin with. I own a medium pony mare, a handful of people assume that since she is a pony she must be good for kids - NOT the case. She is quite hot and unpredictable - her "hottness" occasionally goes beyond the point of being able to channel that energy into something useful, and combined with being unpredictable, she is not a suitable mount for a beginner.

My other mare is TB. They have a bad rep for themselves among certain people (ie: read that as most people who don't know the breed personally hear "TB" and think fire breathing dragon). My mare is a saint of a horse. Quiet as they come. I stick all my beginner friends on her, and someday she will be the perfect packer for my kids. She's a moose though at 17.3h, built like a WB so she is thick. Even though she is the perfect beginner horse, at this point I won't let beginners ride her regularly as she is doing so well at the higher level shows and has potential for more, provided her rider is experienced at the upper levels, this mare has potential for much higher levels. So just because she is a docile horse, doesn't mean I'd stick lesson kids on her as part of a program. When she's older and semi-retired, sure! But not now.
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post #5 of 12 Old 11-08-2015, 05:05 PM
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This is getting boring, I think I will have "I agree with Drafty" as a signature line, because it seems I keep saying it.

The best horse for a beginner to ride is good enough to respond to aids not properly applied, who doesn't react to aids over applied. Quiet, kind, and generous, and that has nothing to do with breed, just type of horse.

Also agree that Freisian movement could be BIG for a beginner.

=======================================

LOL also have no idea how many posts will have been made, I started typing this a while ago, but then got busy so didn't post it!!!

“Never attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidity”
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post #6 of 12 Old 11-08-2015, 05:44 PM
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The best horse is a broke, safe horse that will take care of its rider and has smooth gaits so a beginner can develop balance. Also, a size that will not intimidate a new, nervous rider. No best breed.
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post #7 of 12 Old 11-08-2015, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Golden Horse View Post
This is getting boring, I think I will have "I agree with Drafty" as a signature line, because it seems I keep saying it.

The best horse for a beginner to ride is good enough to respond to aids not properly applied, who doesn't react to aids over applied. Quiet, kind, and generous, and that has nothing to do with breed, just type of horse.

Also agree that Freisian movement could be BIG for a beginner.

=======================================

LOL also have no idea how many posts will have been made, I started typing this a while ago, but then got busy so didn't post it!!!
Awwww!! Thanks, GH! :-D
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post #8 of 12 Old 11-12-2015, 05:34 PM
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My daughter rode a friesian at age 9 and for several months as she worked on her dressage training. Quite a large horse and yes, big movement. Even though she was the most gentle horse, my daughter never felt 100% comfortable on her. We moved on to a barn full of QH crosses and they were perfect for her.
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post #9 of 12 Old 11-12-2015, 10:49 PM
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Any horse of any breed can be good for a beginner. However, breeds are breeds for a reason: they all share similar characteristics. Most Friesians are pretty brave, so they probably won't be spooky. However, some are trained to be a bit more lively, which is not suitable for a beginner. In addition, they usually have extremely bouncy trots, which is not good for a beginner. But, I do regularly ride a Friesian that has a relatively smooth trot. Every horse is different, but I would say that Friesians are generally not a good beginner's horse, though I do ride one that is.
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post #10 of 12 Old 11-13-2015, 08:30 AM
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If you are trying to convince your dad you'll probably find that while you care a lot about the horse you ride he really doesn't. What a parent will often care about is the experience and qualifications of the instructor that will ultimately be responsible. The horse in many ways is inconsequential. A good instructor will ensure you're on the right horse.
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