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post #11 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 06:57 AM
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This is a hard one to answer when it comes to aggression in the stable.

The reaction of two horses might be the same, ears back, coming strongly towards you or even turning their backsides towards you.
The art is to be able to assess whether the horses is being top dog or, reacting from fear - both need correcting in chasing back but the aggressor needs far harder handling.

With your lack of experience you should not be handling any stud horses until you have had more experience.
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post #12 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Rainaisabelle View Post
Of course in theory you shouldn't go straight to hitting first I should explain more basically what I am asking is do stallions tend to be more aggressive when it comes to corrections of any sort ?
They do have more testosterone, but if a stallion reacts dangerously to fair discipline (keyword FAIR, most of them will fight back if abused), he needs gelding. A dangerous animal shouldn't be bred from and if a horse isn't being bred from he should be a gelding.
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post #13 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 10:14 AM
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They do have more testosterone, but if a stallion reacts dangerously to fair discipline (keyword FAIR, most of them will fight back if abused), he needs gelding. A dangerous animal shouldn't be bred from and if a horse isn't being bred from he should be a gelding.
Poor disposition and a high level of testosterone can be a bad combination, but I think many of the problems with stallions come from not treating them like any other horse from a young age. I would expect the same good behavior from a stud colt as I would a gelding or filly, and when he is old enough he should have a job to do as any other horse. The problem is they are not all raised like this, and when you don't know the stallion at all you have no idea of what you may encounter. I have worked with both kinds. Some I have trusted completely and a few others that I would never turn my back on.
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post #14 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 10:31 AM
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I cannot disagree with you over the handling for respect from a young age with a colt however some have the problem that as soon as they start to mature their brain cells migrate south and they think of nothing else no matter how they are handled.

Dealing with a lot of entire colts for flat racing, and many older colts/stallions I have experienced all sorts. Some even at the age of four or five haven't a clue what 'entire' means. Others are randy at the age of two and can be very difficult to get thinking in the right direction.
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post #15 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 12:55 PM
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I cannot disagree with you over the handling for respect from a young age with a colt however some have the problem that as soon as they start to mature their brain cells migrate south and they think of nothing else no matter how they are handled.
These are precisely the kind of colts that need gelding. Why bother with an animal you just can't work with when there are plenty of talented AND respectful studs? It's too dangerous IMO.

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post #16 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 01:00 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks a lot for the responses - I asked because it's a family run practice all grooming for example is done in the stall (I find this strange) but mainly because it's tucked away in a busy part of London and they wan't to minimize the rise of escape as much as possible - I want to add they do have a large pasture area they are all turned out daily with a sectioned part for the stallions that are rotated throughout the day. They also own a few acres but she has to trailer the horses on a rotation every week. She already gave us an example of how to position so you aren't pinned and have the largest space towards the door. Thing is I am a confident person as have experience and qualifications combined for training the likes of primates parrots bomb dogs etc... As a result I have been paired with a very nervous 13yr old girl so we might learn together and I can keep her safe just through common sense - but horses are horses lol.

I spose the question I'm trying to ask - is it possible to earn respect in a STALL (as initially that's where I'll begin my introduction, again not ideal I feel)? I wan't to take the time to get to know them all, not to invade their home, and teach them I won't be bullied. Is it an idea to take a few treats or should I reserve this for later?
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post #17 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 01:30 PM
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Treats and respect have absolutely nothing to do with each other. Horses like and respect a person who they feel they can trust to lead. Be calm, consistent and confident, and make sure the horses understand you're in charge. They move when you say move. They don't invade your personal space. They don't pin ears or turn rear ends at you. They don't walk off when you approach them. It's all the little things that you have to stay on top of - if a horse knows you won't tolerate minor transgressions, most won't escalate to major dangerous ones.

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post #18 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
I cannot disagree with you over the handling for respect from a young age with a colt however some have the problem that as soon as they start to mature their brain cells migrate south and they think of nothing else no matter how they are handled.

Dealing with a lot of entire colts for flat racing, and many older colts/stallions I have experienced all sorts. Some even at the age of four or five haven't a clue what 'entire' means. Others are randy at the age of two and can be very difficult to get thinking in the right direction.
Brain cells travelling south at a certain age can happen to humans too. Some (horses and people) certainly do require much more reminding of their manners than others. Unfortunately what I have seen in this country are stallions that are not handled much just because they are stallions, which just compounds the problem if they were challenging to work with from the start.
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post #19 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Kalraii View Post
Thanks a lot for the responses - I asked because it's a family run practice all grooming for example is done in the stall (I find this strange) but mainly because it's tucked away in a busy part of London and they wan't to minimize the rise of escape as much as possible - I want to add they do have a large pasture area they are all turned out daily with a sectioned part for the stallions that are rotated throughout the day. They also own a few acres but she has to trailer the horses on a rotation every week. She already gave us an example of how to position so you aren't pinned and have the largest space towards the door. Thing is I am a confident person as have experience and qualifications combined for training the likes of primates parrots bomb dogs etc... As a result I have been paired with a very nervous 13yr old girl so we might learn together and I can keep her safe just through common sense - but horses are horses lol.

I spose the question I'm trying to ask - is it possible to earn respect in a STALL (as initially that's where I'll begin my introduction, again not ideal I feel)? I wan't to take the time to get to know them all, not to invade their home, and teach them I won't be bullied. Is it an idea to take a few treats or should I reserve this for later?
First of all, I have a problem with the word respect when it is used only as the horse needing to respect the handler when I feel that respect has to go both ways. But, to answer your question, it certainly can be gained in the stall. If all one person ever did with a horse is lead him to and from his stall and paddock you are still interacting for those few minutes
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post #20 of 44 Old 08-15-2015, 03:35 PM
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These are precisely the kind of colts that need gelding. Why bother with an animal you just can't work with when there are plenty of talented AND respectful studs? It's too dangerous IMO.
Not if they are bred for Flat Racing!

A horse that has class breeding even if the few brain cells it has in its head, is worth a lot if it wins races and goes on to stand at stud.
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