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post #31 of 44 Old 08-17-2015, 07:31 AM
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My one bit of advice would be that if you see someone doing something with the horses that makes you uncomfortable (for example, their behavior is too risky, too violent, too harsh, etc.), try to watch someone else do the same activity and see if they have a different way of doing it that you're more comfortable with. Or research how others do it on this forum or elsewhere and then see if it works with your horses.

I say this because there are many ways of accomplishing the same task with horses, and you need to find the methods that work for you and that feel right and fair for the horse, especially when dealing with rescues. Good luck!
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post #32 of 44 Old 08-17-2015, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by ecasey View Post
My one bit of advice would be that if you see someone doing something with the horses that makes you uncomfortable (for example, their behavior is too risky, too violent, too harsh, etc.), try to watch someone else do the same activity and see if they have a different way of doing it that you're more comfortable with. Or research how others do it on this forum or elsewhere and then see if it works with your horses.

I say this because there are many ways of accomplishing the same task with horses, and you need to find the methods that work for you and that feel right and fair for the horse, especially when dealing with rescues. Good luck!
Ecasey has brought up an excellent point here. There is no one exact way to accomplish something that is "correct", and that would make any other way "incorrect". In the beginning we have nothing to fall back on and it pays to follow and copy our instruction as best we can. When we find something difficult either physically or emotionally to do there is nothing wrong with modifying our technique as long as the end result is the same.
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post #33 of 44 Old 08-17-2015, 09:34 PM
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Originally Posted by blue eyed pony View Post
The trouble is there's a lot to like and a lot NOT to like about PNH, or any horsemanship guru (natural or otherwise). And I think what to like and what not to like will vary depending on the individual horse .
...And the individual handler & their understanding(or otherwise) & application of the principles.
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post #34 of 44 Old 08-17-2015, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony View Post
The trouble is there's a lot to like and a lot NOT to like about PNH, or any horsemanship guru (natural or otherwise). And I think what to like and what not to like will vary depending on the individual horse .
...And the individual handler & their understanding(or otherwise) & application of the principles.
^ this...
While I think parelli is a good place to start everyone interprets it differently and will try and use their interpretation. I don't think parelli works for every horse.. For example some of It doesn't work for my TB when he used to be extremely annoying and refused to move no matter what I did this lady came up and started using this parelli technique to tap on his shoulder to try and get him to move eventually is took on step sideways and got out of her reach, I actually thought it was really funny and smart .

My suggestion is that is it possible for you to maybe buddy with someone for a bit just to see what the go is with handling the horses? What are their likes dislikes? Do some need a more sensitive hand or a more confident hand?
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post #35 of 44 Old 08-21-2015, 06:43 PM Thread Starter
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Hiya guys just an update. Thanks Textan for your message and response - I'm glad it was just a misunderstanding! And thanks to all your responses - they DID help. I was just overly nervous.

So I have spent a week at the stables. And bearing in mind experiencing as an adult is definitely DIFFERENT lol. As a person who has a LOT of animal experience including veterinary (family business) I feel kind of shot down at the place I finally chose to volunteer. I'm not sure if what I'm witnessing is NORMAL for stable yard?? (please correct me if I'm wrong) It's family run since 1989 - there are horses that are just for board, some for the infrequent lesson, some for breeding or just oldies that need taking care of.... I'll list a few points that have me concerned about my decision to volunteer here.

1. On my first day I was asking general questions about horses. Instead of being answered, BECAUSE I asked about "why does he not like his feet being done" I was banned from not only mucking out/grooming but even interacting with them (even to unhook their head collars from their hooks just on the inside of the door). I asked too many questions and now I'm only able to groom/clean for 5 horses. In addition I was then told I wasn't allowed to use a fork/shovel to spot clean (I'm not allowed to properly muck out) I have to use my hands only. I've mucked out horses and other animals before. But that didn't matter. "I didn't know the special technique" and she didn't want to even show me she was that concerned about me wasting straw. And LASTLY, even after a demonstration from both me and the yard manager the owner banned me picking ANY feet because I don't know how to identify foot problems. I guess not looking at feet will help me in that department.

2. Cleanliness. I was impressed initially at the emphasis on keeping the yard clean and the tack. But then I was told to clean the grooming kits properly and I was then given a lesson in HOW to clean the grooming kits on the muck heap. Poo got everywhere but it didn't matter as long as the brushes were clean from dust and hair. When I asked about washing them with water I was told that was "the easy way" and I should clean them as shown between each horse. I was then sent off to groom my next horse with a poo smeared brush. (I mean I wiped it off as best I could, but y'know.... coming from a family with a veterinary background I'm pretty conscious of cross contamination). SECONDLY there is a horse that has an on-going case of conjunctivitis they can't seem to get rid of despite anti-biotics. The daily routine I must adhere to is dipping a baby wipe in her drinking water and scrubbing both eyes, with the same wipe - at this point I'm afraid to ask questions but i can't help but wonder if it's just being exacerbated by the baby wipes in addition to the not so vigilant cleaning routine. She also has a mite infestation on (or rather IN should I say) her lower legs they can't seem to kick. We also have to wash all the horses faces with a baby wipe which seems strange to me? PLEASE correct me if I'm being picky.

3. So I'm volunteering for 3-5 days a week from 10am-6pm. I'm not allowed to do much now other than spot clean/groom the horses listed for me and hay nets (but only after she's printed a weight chart, which I totally agree with). I haven't once got an opportunity to observe a lesson or free schooling as I'm left in the yard on my own to complete menial tasks (I'm not allowed to do much WITH the horses outside of what's listed, but I am ALWAYS KEPT BUSY). I was also told that "volunteers are for the benefit of the owner and her horses, she doesn't HAVE to teach me about them." I joined for MULTIPLE REASONS but I never joined with the stipulation that she HAD to teach me or give me 6 hours worth of horse lectures at all, but I also wasn't expecting to be banned from routine tasks such as picking feet - and then being told there was no point being shown because I'm not to do them. When I asked about others being allowed, how come they have her confidence and where/how COULD I begin to learn about horsemanship she shrugged and answered "not here".


I am volunteering because it's the first real work I've done since witnessing the accident that resulted in my uncles death two years ago. I haven't been able to find a job - so until UNI next year I just wanted to use my time productively and actually invest time in my long lifetime wish to work with and own horses. But not only can I not find a job, it appears I have ended up somewhere that, despite the hours I put in this week alone for free and my good intentions, I've already been donned the "Cape of Worthlessness". I broke my ankle 3 months ago and 1 1/2 years bed bound has made me overweight and slow (man I worked like dog to get things done this week and it wasn't good enough still). Other than the above mentioned the horses ARE loved, ARE cared for (outside of the strange conjunctivitis case I'm aware of) and the two yard women I have worked with have been an absolute pleasure to be around. But as for the owner, who IS the rightful authority.... she's kind of done a 180 and basically said that I wont ever be allowed more than I have been limited to. Is this a TEST? Are these things NORMAL? I am considering giving a full month and seeing how things go - because at the end of the day I am getting SOME interaction but doing 8 hours 3-5 days a week, without ANY kind of progression to look forward to (even if it takes a year!) is kind of daunting.


It's a long post, if you read I give you my heartfelt thanks <3 I guess this more of a blog on "idiot new horsewoman learning how to horse lol". I can't possibly be the ONLY one in my position....
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post #36 of 44 Old 08-21-2015, 07:16 PM
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"not here".
That pretty much sums it up. They are treating you like pond scum.
No one should be treated or talked to like that, especially a volunteer.

I'd go one more time. Tell Miss Bossy Freak that conjunctivitis is easily cured with steroid eye ointment, then leave.

I'm sorry you were treated like that.
You have a good heart. Find a place that will appreciate you. Don't give her 1 more minute to abuse you.
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post #37 of 44 Old 08-21-2015, 07:17 PM
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Sounds like yard owner is a selfish, childish, nasty control freak who is just being mean to you because you're letting her. I'd be telling her where to get off! Go give your time & effort to someone nice!
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post #38 of 44 Old 08-22-2015, 10:49 AM
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Kalraii, I would say that someone who is willing to learn, has some experience that can be adapted to horses, has common sense, works hard despite be a bit out of shape, and works for FREE, is an asset to any stable. You have made an effort to do something for yourself by taking this position and it is time to make another effort to find a better situation. The owner of this place does deserve to be told off, but I would rise above that and simply say that you agreed to work for free in exchange for education and experience and since you are not getting that you are moving on. I wish you luck in finding something that works for you.
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post #39 of 44 Old 08-23-2015, 10:06 AM
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As a beginner it is unlikely you will be asked to work with the stallions. I think that would be totally irresponsible on their part.

Regardless, if you EVER feel worried or threatened by any horse or situation, discuss it with the owner and get her support to learn to handle that particular issue.

If anyone is stupid enough to tell you to 'harden up' or 'don't be silly' they are not taking you seriously and you should just tell them straight "I do not feel comfortable doing (that...)". They know you are learning and any stress or time pressure they are under is not your problem.

You should not be dealing with any aggressive/disrespectful horses to begin with, it is not in the interest of the horse, or your confidence. Don't ever be afraid to say you are not comfortable with that.
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post #40 of 44 Old 08-23-2015, 10:25 AM
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I just read the 'update' and cant believe how you are being treated. That sort of boss went out with the ark!!

If there is another stable nearby perhaps apply to them, they may appreciate your time more. You are giving your time to these people at no cost to them, and even if they were paying you, you are due some respect.

As to the conjunctivitis the recommendation is saline solution (presumably gently flushing the eye) and if that doesnt work the vet may need to flush the tear duct or rule out corneal ulcers. Baby wipes? Some of them are not gentle enough for baby's bottom!!

Seems this woman will ruin your confidence, not build it. Let her do her own dirty work and find someone who knows that 8 hours a day three times a week is worth investing some training in you, especially when they are not paying you.
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