Questions about going to go look at my potential first horse - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 29Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 19 Old 02-02-2015, 02:26 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Western Washington
Posts: 191
• Horses: 1
Sounds like you're doing it right. Here's some feedback:

Quote:
Originally Posted by khorses23 View Post
If I like the horse, I am having a trial period of 2 weeks with the horse before it is officially mine.
That's a good sign if they're willing to let you do a trial period but typically most people won't allow it

Quote:
Originally Posted by khorses23 View Post
During this time I am going to get a vet check by my vet and get the previous vet records.
Most states don't allow you to get a copy of vet records so double check that first. The current owner would have to and I don't think that's a normal thing to ask the owner for unless they're making a claim about some medical procedure like vaccines. Good job on going for a vet check. Depending on how much you're paying for the horse it may be worthwhile to get blood drawn for a toxicology report. It's expensive so don't bother if you're dealing with a horse under 10k. The general tests are usually good enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by khorses23 View Post
My trainer is coming with me both times I go look at the horse.
Excellent

Quote:
Originally Posted by khorses23 View Post
Is it rude/weird to ask the owner if I can watch her bring the horse in/out of the field before and after we ride and watch her tack and untack the horse? How the horse is on the ground is also going to be a big factor for me.
Absolutely normal to ask to see that and you should

Quote:
Originally Posted by khorses23 View Post
Could I also ask to take the horse out on the trail? How would that work? Would the owner go with me on another horse and we would be out there for a very short period of time - just so I can kind of see how she is?
You can ask but not every owner is willing to do that. A lot of it depends on the price of the horse and how much effort the owner wants to put into the sale. If there's a trail accessible from where the horse is it's more likely they'd agree to let your trainer ride it on a trail. When I bought my horse the owner agreed to ride it on a local trail with me walking with them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by khorses23 View Post
How long do you think I am expected to be there? How long will I be riding for? I dont want to take up too much of her time, but I am also very interested in this horse and dont want to feel rushed or that things I am curious about have gone unanswered, especially since the horse is so far away - I dont want it to be a wasted trip.
Just don't waste the owners time. If you're starting to feel like it's not the right horse just let them know. With such a long distance drive spend at least a couple hours there the first time. Help groom and tack up the horse. Let the owner ride the horse for you, let the trainer ride, and then you ride (if you're comfortable). Work in a short trial trail ride if they allow you.

Since the owner hasn't sold the horse in a couple of months there may be something wrong with it or they're just not motivated to sell it. You'll need to look for any signs of them lying or being dishonest (so many horse people are). Do not pay a deposit on a horse that they've been trying to sell for months, they're obviously not in a rush. If you really think it's the perfect horse, you can sign a contract for a conditional sale if the vet check comes back clean. That will give the owner some assurance that you're a serious buyer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by khorses23 View Post
Also, what should I wear? is there anything special I need to bring? I was thinking breeches, tall boots, and either a polo or tshirt. and I am bringing my helmet. Also, when I go to pick her up for the trail period/hopefully to keep her, am I expected to bring a halter and lead rope for her? and what about blankets? Its very cold here, and she doesnt have a lot of hair, would they give her to me with all this stuff and if I end up keeping her, just ship the stuff back to them?
Bring your own stuff. Everyone has extra old rope halters and ropes around they're probably be willing to give away but you should still bring your own. The other stuff is your responsibility. If the horse was blanketed before you should get a blanket. You could also ask your trainer to borrow some until you get your own.
khorses23 likes this.
mrwithers is offline  
post #12 of 19 Old 02-02-2015, 10:44 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 104
• Horses: 1
Don't watch her bring the horse in, tack the horse, etc. YOU do all of that. The horse knows the owner. The question is how the horse does with you. Bringing your trainer is veryyy good and I also definitely approve of doing a two week trial period. That's a luxury. I was in the same situation except worse because I got my horse from across the country!
I doubt she'll let you try her on trails, but definitely ask

List of questions I would ask:

1) Horse's temperament from 1-10
2) Any things that the horse constantly spooks at
3) What is an average reaction to a spook
4) How high can she jump (if you're interested)
5) Any soreness in any part of her body
6) Does she get mare-ish (grumpy/wild/mean when in heat)
7) Any unique behavior
8) Can she do flying lead changes
9) How is she on trails
10) What bit is being used on her
11) What saddle is being used on her
12) Are risers being used

Pay attention the the position of the saddle on the horse's back. Is it in the normal spot or is it farther back or closer forward than usual to accommodate her particular withers. Does she put her head down or keep it up? A horse who keeps their head higher has more energy.
khorses23 likes this.
myperuvianpaso is offline  
post #13 of 19 Old 02-02-2015, 10:53 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Kansas, USA
Posts: 2,983
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by myperuvianpaso View Post
Don't watch her bring the horse in, tack the horse, etc. YOU do all of that. The horse knows the owner. The question is how the horse does with you.
No. For the first time I would have the owner do it. The OP does not know the horse so going to catch it without knowing how it does with being caught could be dangerous.
Posted via Mobile Device
Roman is offline  
post #14 of 19 Old 02-03-2015, 01:58 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 462
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by myperuvianpaso View Post
5) Any soreness in any part of her body
Get a prepurchase exam done on any potential horse you may buy. The seller is likely not going to disclose soreness/lameness issues to you upfront. They may also not be aware of underlying issues.


Quote:
11) What saddle is being used on her
12) Are risers being used

Pay attention the the position of the saddle on the horse's back. Is it in the normal spot or is it farther back or closer forward than usual to accommodate her particular withers.
A saddle shouldn't be farther forward or back to accommodate the withers. It should sit about 2-3 inches behind the shoulder regardless of the shape of the withers. The seller could be using a saddle that does or does not fit the horse. A certain saddle that fits the horse may not always fit you. Have a saddle fitter assist you in finding a good fit for you and the horse you buy. Don't buy a saddle until you have the horse first.

Quote:
Does she put her head down or keep it up? A horse who keeps their head higher has more energy.
Not really. It just means they use their neck muscles incorrectly.
beverleyy, Foxhunter and khorses23 like this.
Canterklutz is offline  
post #15 of 19 Old 02-03-2015, 02:43 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: South East Texas
Posts: 7,206
• Horses: 2
Personally I always want to catch, groom, and tack the horse myself before the owner ever does anything, because if the horse won't respond well to me immediately, I'd rather move on. Too many horses are spoiled to a certain way of things, and it is so much easier to tell when you're hands on from the get-go. I do ask the owner to ride before me to reduce the risk of me getting hurt, but not tack. I drove 2 hours to see one mare that looked really nice once, but she spooked twice at the saddle blanket when I walked over to her with it. I didn't even throw it on her- she saw it and spooked. Her owner tried to tell me me she had never done that before, and maybe it was because my pad smelled like another horse, or because I walked straight at her with it and didn't let her sniff it....this was supposedly a beginners horse. If she was going to full out spook because I didn't let her sniff my saddle pad, no way I'm going to consider her for a beginner rider!!!

Also always take someone with you for a second opinion. It is way too easy to think you can deal with something, when in reality you've just fallen in love and you CAN'T.
verona1016 and khorses23 like this.

Everyone in your life is meant to
be in your journey, but not all of
them are meant to stay till the end.
Endiku is offline  
post #16 of 19 Old 02-03-2015, 03:10 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 5,323
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrwithers View Post
Most states don't allow you to get a copy of vet records so double check that first. The current owner would have to and I don't think that's a normal thing to ask the owner for unless they're making a claim about some medical procedure like vaccines. Good job on going for a vet check. Depending on how much you're paying for the horse it may be worthwhile to get blood drawn for a toxicology report. It's expensive so don't bother if you're dealing with a horse under 10k. The general tests are usually good enough.
I think most any state allows vet records to be released with the owner's permission. I wouldn't put too much stock in vet records, though. Just because a vet has records for a horse doesn't mean it's a complete record. I know of a lady that agreed to release the horse's vet records to the buyer, but what she did was hand over the records for the vet who comes to the barn to do vaccinations for all the horses. This vet was not the horse's regular vet. So the vet record the buyer got said the horse was never seen for anything other than routine vaccinations (looks like a normal vet record for a healthy horse), when in reality the horse was being seen and treated by the seller's vet of choice, and she did have at least one condition that should have been disclosed (I forget what it was), but wasn't!
mrwithers, CASugar and khorses23 like this.

“The horse is a mirror to your soul. Sometimes you might not like what you see. Sometimes you will.” - Buck Brannaman
"Nothing forced can ever be beautiful." - Xenophon
verona1016 is offline  
post #17 of 19 Old 02-09-2015, 04:01 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 138
• Horses: 0
OP. did you buy the horse???
How did everything turn out?
mrwithers likes this.
CASugar is offline  
post #18 of 19 Old 02-10-2015, 08:26 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 113
• Horses: 3
Is it rude/weird to ask the owner if I can watch her bring the horse in/out of the field before and after we ride and watch her tack and untack the horse? How the horse is on the ground is also going to be a big factor for me.

While I'm there, what all should I ask about the horse? Some of the questions I already have written down include:
1. how is she with other horses?
2. how is she around other animals?
3. how is she around kids?
4. what are her likes/dislikes?
5. how is she if you give her a few days off?
6. whats her normal work schedule like?
7. what are the cues she responds to best while riding?
8. do you lounge her before you ride?

Could I also ask to take the horse out on the trail? How would that work? Would the owner go with me on another horse and we would be out there for a very short period of time - just so I can kind of see how she is?

Exciting, going to look at your first horse, isn't it? Don't let your excitement get in the way of keeping a level head. I would bring an experienced horse person with me so that he/she can offer another set of eyes. First off, observe the horse. Hopefully there will be other horses present, so you can see where he seems to be in the pecking order. you should be watching the owner handling the horse, absolutely! Consider it a red flag if the horse is already caught, tacked and tied. If that is the case, I would ask for him to be untacked and put back out in the field. Don't feel silly or rude, Ask all the right questions. It's easy to buy a horse...not so easy to get rid of one if it's not a good fit.
Ideally, the horse should be at liberty when you arrive. Watch the owner catch & halter him. Ask to see him on the lunge line. Waych how responsive the horse is on the ground. Maybe your experienced friend will then lunge the horse, and then you, too. Watch the owner tack him up. Does he enjoy being groomed? Can she lift all his feet with ease to pick out his hooves? How willing does he give his head for bridling? Does he stand for mounting? Dismounting? Remounting? Watch him being ridden in a fenced area, if possible. Have your friend ride him. Then you. If there is another horse the owner can ride, you might want to try a short trail ride or at least up and down a driveway to see how he handles. Horses have MANY days off. Especially this time of year. The ideal horse is the same day to day, season to season, regardless of how many days /weeks/ even months unridden. A lot of ground work and conditioning prior to riding after a layoff period is a must for any horse & rider, IMO. The questions you listed are good ones, but they should come second to seeing how the horse is on the ground and under saddle. I would also ask for a trial period. No better way to see if a horse is the right one for you.
Cmck is offline  
post #19 of 19 Old 02-11-2015, 07:20 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: I'm an American girl living in southwest France
Posts: 1,563
• Horses: 6
You're getting great advice here. I just wanted to add this thing here ... if the owner acts like she doesn't know the answers to your questions, beware. A lot of people aren't comfortable outright lying, but they will say they don't know something they really do, just to avoid having to share bad news. :)

“When I bestride him, I soar, I am a hawk: he trots the air; the earth sings when he touches it; the basest horn of his hoof is more musical than the pipe of Hermes. ” ~ William Shakespeare
ecasey is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Interview Questions for Potential Riders DextersMom Horse Jobs 5 01-29-2015 05:31 PM
Looking for Thread on Questions to Ask Potential Boarding Barns JenniMay Horse Boarding 3 07-20-2013 05:26 AM
Questions to ask when going to see a potential buy..and other questions. Cowgirls Boots Horse Talk 2 07-18-2011 04:27 PM
What questions should I ask a potential trainer? coffeeaddict Horse Training 7 05-27-2011 07:04 PM
Any questions I should ask a potential Horse College? A knack for horses Horse Talk 1 11-04-2010 09:20 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome