Questions of a new horse owner to a experienced one. - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 07-25-2015, 01:47 PM Thread Starter
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Questions of a new horse owner to a experienced one.

Hello, some may know a little about me from my introduction post. If not, ill say hi, I'm a new horse owner. Not new to horse but to owning one yes indeed.

I have a few question and very little ecperience at how to go about some of them

First question: How would you go about to riding a horse that hasn't been rode in a good while say over 2 years?

Second question: Has anyone had any experience in trail riding a one eyed horse? Any advice?

Third question: Any riding advice in gernal? I never rode a horse full out by myself meaning I never rode a horse without someone leading it or at a fair with the ones that walk in a circle when I was little. My mom passed away and she use to ride a horse and own one but she is not here to guide me on these things so I now seek out help to those out there.

Forth question: How would you go about training a horse to not spook at things that are different when riding?

Fifth question: What should I expect on a Horse trail? And how should one go about trail riding if I have no one else to trail ride with, is there groups that I can go with that can help out a novice like me?

If anyone can help, I would be going trail riding about Dillon area, they have a horse area with lots of horse trails around. This is located in Zanesville ohio. Any who go riding there who could help me out I would be greatly appreciated. Or who I could even go riding with would be even greater.
I think (I just call him mojo for now) Mojo is a halfinger, gelding. There's more information on my first post my introduction post.
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post #2 of 20 Old 07-25-2015, 02:12 PM
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I strongly advise you to find a hands on, experienced horse person, or trainer to help you. Maybe put an ad on Craigslist, or look on facebook for local groups to find people to ride with. Honestly though you sound like you will benefit from lessons and tutoring on horse ownership in general. Look for lesson barns in your area, ask at feed stores for recommendations, equine vets usually know about trainers in the area. If you look hard enough you will find help.

Some horses can not get ridden for two years and act like they have worked every day, others not so much. If your horse is spooky he/she probably needs some groundwork and confidence before you go out riding.

I have ridden a couple one eyed horses and they do just fine, one of them was a little more apt to spook, but for the most part they did fine. The confidence will come from working on the ground and gaining trust.

All of the questions you have really have one answer in my mind. Groundwork and to learn how to do it properly your going to most likely need eyes on the ground guiding you and teaching you.
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post #3 of 20 Old 07-25-2015, 02:31 PM
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My first bit of advice is to absolutely get yourself a trainer or at the very least, someone who is experienced with horses to help you learn to communicate with the horse in a way he will understand. If you have 4h in your area they are a great place to start.

There are some things you can do on your own, but it is so much easier and safer when you have horse knowledgeable people to guide you through when you simply aren't sure about something or don't quite know how to deal with an issue. It can’t really be done well over the internet.

If he was only green-broke he will probably need a good refresher course starting with the very basics.

If he is a been-there-done-that horse the process will more than likely be a lot quicker.

Since I assume you don’t really want to start off risking an injury, and since you have never ridden a horse not being lead by someone, my suggestion would be begin with ground work.

By groundwork I mean basic manners to start; walking on lead, stopping when you stop, moving forward when you do and not getting pushy, standing still, tying patiently, lifting feet, allowing you to touch him anywhere. Once he has those things down well, I would move on to some basic lunge work (but there is a language you need to learn about that as well) and then do some hand walks out on the trails to see how he responds (again, see that he retains his lead manners). If he does fine through that, I would start seeing how he responds to being tacked up. If you don't know how to tack a horse up just keep doing the hand walks until you get some more lessons.

There is a whole long process of getting to know each other and building a mutual respect that will help with spooks, especially important since he is blind to one side.

I would also suggest getting someone who has experience riding green-broke horses to come ride him a few times and evaluate where he is in his training before you even think about mounting up.


Hope this helps.
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post #4 of 20 Old 07-25-2015, 02:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamFall View Post
Hello, some may know a little about me from my introduction post. If not, ill say hi, I'm a new horse owner. Not new to horse but to owning one yes indeed.

I have a few question and very little ecperience at how to go about some of them

First question: How would you go about to riding a horse that hasn't been rode in a good while say over 2 years?
Depends on the horse. I've had horses that haven't been ridden in years and they are fine. But sounds like some lessons and ground work may be in order for your experience level.
Second question: Has anyone had any experience in trail riding a one eyed horse? Any advice?
Usually these horses adapt well. Especially if they have a confident rider they can trust
Third question: Any riding advice in gernal? I never rode a horse full out by myself meaning I never rode a horse without someone leading it or at a fair with the ones that walk in a circle when I was little. My mom passed away and she use to ride a horse and own one but she is not here to guide me on these things so I now seek out help to those out there. Sounds like lessons would be the best at this point.

Forth question: How would you go about training a horse to not spook at things that are different when riding? This comes from a balanced confident horse and confident rider.

Fifth question: What should I expect on a Horse trail? And how should one go about trail riding if I have no one else to trail ride with, is there groups that I can go with that can help out a novice like me? Your lesson barn should be able to help?

If anyone can help, I would be going trail riding about Dillon area, they have a horse area with lots of horse trails around. This is located in Zanesville ohio. Any who go riding there who could help me out I would be greatly appreciated. Or who I could even go riding with would be even greater.
I think (I just call him mojo for now) Mojo is a halfinger, gelding. There's more information on my first post my introduction post.
Answers imbedded in bold and underlined
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post #5 of 20 Old 07-25-2015, 05:13 PM
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A trainer is going to be a must.

I have been riding for 10 years and still take lessons, not because I can't ride but you can make a lot of mistakes.
It will also be nice to have someone give you advice. What to use, what is good, what a waste of money.

I wouldn't reccommend taking him out onto a trail until you have more time in the saddle with an instructor. Some horses loves trails alone, my mare just walks along but my gelding rears up and bucks.

With a horse that has been sitting for years, you are going to want to try and get him into a routine, like people, horses tend to be a creature of habit.

I always like to warm up my green or have-been-sitting horses with a nice little lunge to get there bucks out, but if you are unsure of how to lunge then don't.

There are a lot of things that are going to go into riding your new friend, and having an experienced friend or trainer will make all the difference.

Remember, heels down and butt in the saddle.

Depending on your area you can check craiglist and yellowpages for a trainer
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post #6 of 20 Old 07-26-2015, 09:10 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone I will take your advice to hand, I don't have a lot of money to go spend on a trainer nor do I know of any in the area that would teach just western saddle either. I do know the basics of lunging and surprisingly even though I don't ride a horse or have owned one before I know how to tack up. That question actually brought to mind someone I know who has had horses for years who might be able to help me With things. He has worked with horse and even works with ones trained for little kids to ride safely. I always help him out at the fair with the care of the horses while I'm not at the barns with my own. That's were my love for horse came from and he's the one that taught me how to tack up. I would help put the saddles on and I usually left the girth to him but sometimes ill tighten and have him check and make sure there not too tight OR too loose, them horses are to smart, they breath in and hold it while there tighten. :P

But ill try and find a trainer that might be able to help if he can't or I know a few others but I'm not really wanting to go towards them cause they don't treat there horses bad but there too rough with them and Mojo is going to need a gentle person so he does not lose trust in people.
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post #7 of 20 Old 07-26-2015, 10:35 AM
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I'm about as gentle and patient as they come with my animals but sometimes getting "rough" is necessary to stay safe.

There's a phrase by a natural horsemanship person "As gentle as possible, as firm as necessary".

What do you mean by "rough"?

As much as you love them, don't ever forget these are large animals and they need to follow rules just like people do to keep a safe environment for everyone.
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post #8 of 20 Old 07-26-2015, 10:53 AM
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I say this with love and respect but.... If you can't afford a few training rides or lessons, what are you doing saddling the cost of owning a horse?

When you describe someone who has "never ridden out alone" are you describing yourself? It says in one portion of the post that you are not experienced owning, but are experienced around horses.
I just want to get my facts straight before I offer advice, except for this:

Please, find a way to even just get a few contacts with a trainer. Some lessoning/riding (even if it means in an english saddle) will absolutely be better than nothing!

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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post #9 of 20 Old 07-26-2015, 10:44 PM
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As others have said, lessons are essential. They're also cheaper than horse ownership. Once you have the basics down pat being linked with a trainer is still a great thing because when you run into trouble you know where to turn.

I wouldn't even consider riding a horse that hasn't been ridden for years until you really have your basics established.

In your case, after you've done a few months of lessons on a school horse I'd suggest you send your horse to your trainer for a couple weeks as a re-fresher and so they can identify what you need to work on.

Learning to ride English initially certainly will not negatively impact your western riding.
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post #10 of 20 Old 07-27-2015, 12:53 AM
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Definitely, definitely, DEFINITELY get lessons. Lots of lessons. Did I mention lessons? ;)

Trust me, riding a horse at a fair is 110% different than ACTUALLY riding-by that I mean, riding without being led in a circle, or whatever. I've taken lessons for nine years and I've STILL got so much to learn. Trust me, training a horse is nothing like the kind of stuff you see in the movie Flicka or whatever. Those types of movies make training and riding look magical and fantasy-like and easy.

Let me give you some advice in general: It will never be easy. Riding will easily be the most challenging, frustrating, infuriating sport you've ever taken part in. But the rewards of riding are much greater than the frustrations!

Good luck, and take some lessons ;)
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