Questions of a new horse owner to a experienced one. - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 20 Old 07-27-2015, 12:36 PM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Jul 2015
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By what I mean by "rough" Is slapping the horse on the hindquarters because they are frightened or jumping at something. Handling the horse roughly when walking them because the try to back up because of a passing horse or truck and trailer at the horse grounds. I know a horse sometimes you have to be firm with but what I seen since I was there is they were being spooked and didn't need to be slapped because of that. Once they had a new quarter horse and it was trying to swing its butt around on the tie line the owner and his mom picked up sticks or some nearby small pebbles and threw it towards the horse making it spook even more. Me, I got up and went over soothed the horse patting it and holding its halter to keep it from trying to move around again. I know there is a wrong way to be firm but there is a good way too and I think horses need to be treated nicely too, they are a licing animal that need to be worked with slowly to understand things not forced into them. The owner of them horses i believe are rough. Because the girlfriend of there son she had a black and white mare and she agreed with me. He horse was brought up on her fathers farm and she let me ride it and didn't hold the reins but stayed close. She walked beside me while i was riding. And the horse just followed her too, like okay ill be good.

Also for the time being i am being given the items, hay, feed, halter, saddle, and bridle for the time being by the pervious owner. Though i don't have the funds myself for lesson he would pay for them but I'm and grateful enough for what he is providing now.

As for the part about me having experience with horse but not actually owning one heres the story.

Three-four years ago i met someone at the fair. There a family owned famr that go around to fairs bring the ability to riding a horse to little kids who can't. They have a tent with a ring that holds five horses i believe. Ever since i saw him that first year i have always gone back every year since then. The past couple years i got more involved then ever. He even asked if i would like to travel with him and help out. Which i plan to do after college. Each day i would come to the fair to check on my animals and then walk around waiting for them to get up and start moving about. I usually come a hour before they wake up, around 6 in the morning. By the time I'm done with my animals they are up and moving and i come in to help give the horse there water, and fill there hay bags, brush them down and get ready to hook them up. When i did that the year before that's what i did. That year and the next i helped with clean up duty during the day and time of running. That you have to be quick about so the kids can keep riding. Last year he taught me the basic of hoof cleaning and care and how to saddle them up. Teaching me a way to remember the knot to secure the girth.
I even helped out friends with there horses helping clean out stalls bath them, and exercise them with the lung rope or just walking them up and down the side road by the arena. Other then that i know the care of a horse how to tack up, i know how to care for basic injury's and problems that can acquire. At one point, a horse, they fed it grain too soon after riding and it ate to quick and got a ball of it lodge in the throat and we had to flush water down its throat before it choked.
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post #12 of 20 Old 07-27-2015, 03:14 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central Hill Country Texas
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Thank-you for the explanation.

I want to keep you from falling into the trap a lot of first time horse owners get themselves into trying to apply the human concept of "nice" to their horses. Fair, yes. Considerate, yes. "Nice", no.

It does a horse no good to live a life without consequences for behavior that makes them incompatible with humans; that often leads to the slaughterhouse.

I love my horse Oliver, he and I have a special connection and he will do things for me that he makes everyone else work for. He gives me these soft little knickers, follows me all over the pasture when I check fences, keeps all of the other horses from crowding me and prefers to be with me rather than the herd. Most often, the slightest ask from me gets an immediate desired response. Sounds like a romantic book doesn't it?

Sometimes he can still be a turd and at those times, I need to physically, appropriately, calmly, discipline him without malice and we move on. That's reality.

To someone who has never seen a disengement I may appear to be "rough" or abrupt when I turn him in a tight circle with his head on my boot after he decided that he wanted to canter through the juniper brush rather than on the trail and that stopping, was an optional suggestion coming from his rider.

At that point, I am not being "nice" at all, but neither was he when he disregarded my well being. I am however in that moment being fair and considerate. He made a bad choice, a horse who makes a lot of bad choices is a dangerous animal. Dangerous animals end up at the auction barn. As much as he needs to learn that I care for him, he needs to learn that behavior has a consequences, good and bad, his choice. If I offer him a good deal, and he chooses not to take it, well the next offering won't be as good of a deal. It is precisely because I care for him that sometimes I need to be not-nice.

Now, when something like that happens, being the higher thinking being it is inevitably my responsibility.

Almost without exception I knew long before my butt hit the seat that he was not in a listening mood, but rather than spend the time going into a round pen, working on ground manners, reviewing the basics, doing some arena work until he was respectful and listening, I wanted to ride.

My bad choices made his bad choices an inevitability. That was not "fair" of me. You will make mistakes and it is all part of learning horsemanship a process that is never ending.

Do you see how complex all of this can get? Owning a horse and creating a good horse is often done by dancing on the head of a pin split between discipline, fairness, consideration, responsibility and a building of mutual trust over time. It helps tremendously to have someone there who knows, watching your back.

“You spend your whole life with horses and just about the time you think you have them figured out, a horse comes along that tells you otherwise.” –quote from my very wizened trainer


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post #13 of 20 Old 07-27-2015, 08:41 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New South Wales, Australia
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On this forum, and on the real world, you will always hear stories about very well meaning people who rescue, buy or get given a horse when they don't get much experience. Over the first few months the horse "changes". It's starts by not responding, being protective over their food or pushy when being led. It turns into biting, kicking and rearing and often the owner gets hurt. On here we try to get people to take their horse to a trainer, to learn. And we don't do it just to protect the owner, we do it to save the horse because after the horse behaves this way many go to the slaughter house, or a bought by abusive "trainers" or just left and neglected.

The best way to ensure the health and wellbeing of a horse is for is to have good ground and saddle manners.

Some people are legitimately too rough with horses, but it does need to be remembered that horses are rough animals. Together they kick with the strength that can easily break bones, bite hard enough to tear flesh. When humans train horses they should never be about causing pain. Causing pain doesn't teach horses. Horses learn by dominance and suissiom and the way they show this is through movement. If you step aggressively to wards a horse they should move. When a horse does something bad move them and move them fast.

When a horse is scared you want to comfort it but a horse is not a human. Horses feel safe when they are with a dominant herd leader. If you are that person your horse will feel safe.

People on this forum have ridden for many years, some growing up in the saddle. When you get into horses you dedicate a part of your life to them and learn to do things differently. The place that starts is through learning the basics and that's done by learning from someone else.

Imagine it like learning a language. Kids pick it up just by being around it, but adults need to learn it through grammar. We have to understand how the rules and structure are different otherwise we just rely on our own and it might be fine for English but it doesn't work for another language. Once you learn the basics, structure, grammar a few words, then you can start going off into a different country and taking to people, learning as you go. Without those basics you wouldn't have a foundation to build on.

It's similar with horses, there is a certain amount you need to get down pat before you can really be good and safe with horses, and t can't be learned from books.

Go to a trainer and get 50 or so hours under saddle, and ideally another 50 or so in handling experience and theory and then consider having your own horse that is suitable for you.

Also remember just because you are given things, like saddles, doesn't mean they fit.
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post #14 of 20 Old 07-31-2015, 12:12 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: USA
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I hope I don't come off as rude.
But in my honest opinion, I don't have a clue as to why you bought a horse. Lessons are the cheapest part of being an owner. If you can't afford those, that worries me. Riding horses/ponies at the fair is not riding. You need to take lessons so you can keep both yourself and your horse safe.
Do you know the functions of different bits? How often do you have a farrier come out? How often do you deworm? How often do you vaccinate? How often do you get the horse's teeth floated? How do you ask for a walk, trot, canter, turn, stop, and back up? Do you know the signs of colic? Do you know the signs of founder, laminits, strangles, etc? Do you know how to tell if a horse's leg(s) is swollen and/or hot? Do you know how to ask a horse to work over its back? How often and what do you feed a horse? If you change or add feed, how do you go about doing that? What do you do if a horse bucks, bolts, rears, kicks, etc? How can you tell if your tack fits?
You should know the answers to every single one of those questions long before you consider buying a horse. Lacking knowledge could seriously injure your horse.

c'est la vie
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post #15 of 20 Old 08-01-2015, 03:49 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamFall View Post
Thanks everyone I will take your advice to hand, I don't have a lot of money to go spend on a trainer nor do I know of any in the area that would teach just western saddle either. I do know the basics of lunging and surprisingly even though I don't ride a horse or have owned one before I know how to tack up. That question actually brought to mind someone I know who has had horses for years who might be able to help me With things. He has worked with horse and even works with ones trained for little kids to ride safely. I always help him out at the fair with the care of the horses while I'm not at the barns with my own. That's were my love for horse came from and he's the one that taught me how to tack up. I would help put the saddles on and I usually left the girth to him but sometimes ill tighten and have him check and make sure there not too tight OR too loose, them horses are to smart, they breath in and hold it while there tighten. :P

But ill try and find a trainer that might be able to help if he can't or I know a few others but I'm not really wanting to go towards them cause they don't treat there horses bad but there too rough with them and Mojo is going to need a gentle person so he does not lose trust in people.
If you can find a traveling trainer to give you lessons on your own horse at your own location you would find the best of all worlds. They are out there but those with a solid clientele do not bother to advertise. If you can't find a trainer/instructor to come to you, it still would be very helpful to go to a stable and take lessons. Then you can take what you learn and apply it at home. Joining some sort of a horse club (possibly a trail riding group) will help you gain connections, advice and sometimes good friends. Living in Ohio, you really should have no trouble finding people who ride western-look at the Ohio Horse Council website! Also check out the Ohio horse magazine called The Corral-lot's of sources of information there.

Stick to your guns about not letting people who are too rough work with your horse. Many of us have a good sense of what's acceptable and what is not-trust your instincts. You can always read, watch videos and try out techniques yourself. Thanks to the internet, there's tons of free information out there, you just have to be able to weed out the gems from the junk!
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post #16 of 20 Old 08-01-2015, 07:55 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Gulf Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamFall View Post

First question: How would you go about to riding a horse that hasn't been rode in a good while say over 2 years?

Second question: Has anyone had any experience in trail riding a one eyed horse? Any advice?

Third question: Any riding advice in gernal? I never rode a horse full out by myself meaning I never rode a horse without someone leading it or at a fair with the ones that walk in a circle when I was little. My mom passed away and she use to ride a horse and own one but she is not here to guide me on these things so I now seek out help to those out there.

Forth question: How would you go about training a horse to not spook at things that are different when riding?

Fifth question: What should I expect on a Horse trail? And how should one go about trail riding if I have no one else to trail ride with, is there groups that I can go with that can help out a novice like me?
Whoa! Honestly, this is a scary situation. You essentially DO NOT know how to ride or care for a horse and are taking on a green horse, with one eye, that spooks and cannot afford a trainer. This is a train wreck waiting to happen in an infinite amount of possible scenarios. My best advice would be to return the horse. You are not ready for this, and this is a dangerous situation that could end badly for both you and the horse.

I've just begun leasing a horse, but I rode for years in my teens. I am constantly asking my trainer for input or advice on tack, feeding, riding, training, you name it. On top of that I have my board owner with 40 years experience and many other boarders. I question everything I'm doing, and if I have ANY uncertainty, I will ask the nearest person I can find at the barn for advice. You can't do this alone. There are just WAY too many factors in owning a horse where if you don't have the knowledge or experience, you NEED to have a solid source to guide you or things could go terribly bad very quickly.
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post #17 of 20 Old 08-11-2015, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aclassicalpaint View Post
I hope I don't come off as rude.
But in my honest opinion, I don't have a clue as to why you bought a horse. Lessons are the cheapest part of being an owner. If you can't afford those, that worries me. Riding horses/ponies at the fair is not riding. You need to take lessons so you can keep both yourself and your horse safe.
Do you know the functions of different bits? How often do you have a farrier come out? How often do you deworm? How often do you vaccinate? How often do you get the horse's teeth floated? How do you ask for a walk, trot, canter, turn, stop, and back up? Do you know the signs of colic? Do you know the signs of founder, laminits, strangles, etc? Do you know how to tell if a horse's leg(s) is swollen and/or hot? Do you know how to ask a horse to work over its back? How often and what do you feed a horse? If you change or add feed, how do you go about doing that? What do you do if a horse bucks, bolts, rears, kicks, etc? How can you tell if your tack fits?
You should know the answers to every single one of those questions long before you consider buying a horse. Lacking knowledge could seriously injure your horse.
If your being rude or not it doesn't matter to me, and I didn't buy the horse, and im just asking things to learn. And in fact to those questions I happen to be able to answer them all but part of one maybe, I do know different functions of bits, but I know only a few. This I leraned from a nice lady that someone my dad knew who they were dating and she was telling me about different bits and bridles to use on a horse and what breed there best for and such.

If you would like I can answer them if you want me too, some I know because im going to be a vet and in learning to work with a horse it will help me along. I may even be the one to do the shots and help someone when the hoofs become founded. Im hoping to become a farm vet to help people with there horse or other animals. And I just came here to look for advice and tidbids to help me along.


And im sorry about the late reply, I was in a car accident (it was all the other car fault, we where at a dead stop, or well my older sister was as I was in the back seat along with my twin and my dad in the front too.) and been recovering from a concussion, so I haven't been allowed much on a computer.
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post #18 of 20 Old 08-11-2015, 06:56 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia View Post
On this forum, and on the real world, you will always hear stories about very well meaning people who rescue, buy or get given a horse when they don't get much experience. Over the first few months the horse "changes". It's starts by not responding, being protective over their food or pushy when being led. It turns into biting, kicking and rearing and often the owner gets hurt. On here we try to get people to take their horse to a trainer, to learn. And we don't do it just to protect the owner, we do it to save the horse because after the horse behaves this way many go to the slaughter house, or a bought by abusive "trainers" or just left and neglected.

The best way to ensure the health and wellbeing of a horse is for is to have good ground and saddle manners.

Some people are legitimately too rough with horses, but it does need to be remembered that horses are rough animals. Together they kick with the strength that can easily break bones, bite hard enough to tear flesh. When humans train horses they should never be about causing pain. Causing pain doesn't teach horses. Horses learn by dominance and suissiom and the way they show this is through movement. If you step aggressively to wards a horse they should move. When a horse does something bad move them and move them fast.

When a horse is scared you want to comfort it but a horse is not a human. Horses feel safe when they are with a dominant herd leader. If you are that person your horse will feel safe.

People on this forum have ridden for many years, some growing up in the saddle. When you get into horses you dedicate a part of your life to them and learn to do things differently. The place that starts is through learning the basics and that's done by learning from someone else.

Imagine it like learning a language. Kids pick it up just by being around it, but adults need to learn it through grammar. We have to understand how the rules and structure are different otherwise we just rely on our own and it might be fine for English but it doesn't work for another language. Once you learn the basics, structure, grammar a few words, then you can start going off into a different country and taking to people, learning as you go. Without those basics you wouldn't have a foundation to build on.

It's similar with horses, there is a certain amount you need to get down pat before you can really be good and safe with horses, and t can't be learned from books.

Go to a trainer and get 50 or so hours under saddle, and ideally another 50 or so in handling experience and theory and then consider having your own horse that is suitable for you.

Also remember just because you are given things, like saddles, doesn't mean they fit.
Thanks I am working on finding a trainer, or I have in mind someone who could help, the saddle that is being given is the one the horse has been fitted with, so everything is good in that area. And sorry for the late reply been recovering from a concussion, haven't been allowed on the computer.
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post #19 of 20 Old 08-11-2015, 07:05 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tihannah View Post
Whoa! Honestly, this is a scary situation. You essentially DO NOT know how to ride or care for a horse and are taking on a green horse, with one eye, that spooks and cannot afford a trainer. This is a train wreck waiting to happen in an infinite amount of possible scenarios. My best advice would be to return the horse. You are not ready for this, and this is a dangerous situation that could end badly for both you and the horse.

I've just begun leasing a horse, but I rode for years in my teens. I am constantly asking my trainer for input or advice on tack, feeding, riding, training, you name it. On top of that I have my board owner with 40 years experience and many other boarders. I question everything I'm doing, and if I have ANY uncertainty, I will ask the nearest person I can find at the barn for advice. You can't do this alone. There are just WAY too many factors in owning a horse where if you don't have the knowledge or experience, you NEED to have a solid source to guide you or things could go terribly bad very quickly.

Meaning if you don't know how to ride a horse doesn't mean you know not how to take care of a horse. He does not spook, I wish you would reread and try to understand what I said a little better. I understand the misunderstanding for the spooking part, what I meant to say there was ways to desensitize a horse to objects or things happening.
And i will say i wont be returning the horse because hes the sweetest boy i could get, i know he may not be able to be rode but if so he cant be riden he is a good pasture mate. I wouldn't give him up for the world now. Even if i cant ride him he will be the best horse out there. And not saying i wont ride him once i get some more experience he may be a good horse to ride if he does alright with his one eye. If not then what i said.
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post #20 of 20 Old 08-13-2015, 02:32 AM
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It sounds like you are taking to heart the advice to find a trainer, so I won't dwell on that subject (but I agree, you should find one ASAP).

I would suggest to watch closely the trainers you consider too rough. Are they really just smacking on the horse for spooking? Or are they making sure that the horse, a large and potentially dangerous animal is maintaining a safe distance from them when spooking? A pony that I bought initially had the impulse to spook into me, rather than in place or away from me when I first got him. We spent some time working on maintaining appropriate boundaries in general, but you can be that if we were in a spooky situation and he tried to spook in towards me he was reprimanded. It might have looked harsh, but it was first and foremost a safety issue for myself and anyone else who might handle the pony.

I've known a few Haflingers and while they can be fun little horses, most of the ones I know have a tendency to walk all over unconfident or new handlers - they seem to really require a strong and confident, but fair leader.

I've also known a couple of one eyed horses and think it really depends on the horse and their temperament. Most of them have adjusted just fine and are still trail riding or doing arena work with their owners. I know one who is still even jumping a little bit (quite small obstacles). Some of them will swing/turn their head a lot more in order to see with their remaining eye if something makes a strange sound, etc. But overall, they are really adaptable and simply missing one eye shouldn't hold him back from being ride able unless there are other issues as well.
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