Removing saddle before bridle after riding? - Page 7 - The Horse Forum
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post #61 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
I was taught, and have taught that you always put the bridle on first and then the saddle and when untacking saddle off first and then bridle.

The main reason for this is control. If the horse were to get away as you removed the bridle then you have no control over it and it is loose with the saddle on.

Horses that have a martingale need to have the bridle on first to get it attached to the girth.

What you do is put the halter on, remove the saddle and put it on the floor in a safe place and then remove the bridle.

Admittedly in the UK we tack up in the stable. If a horse is only tacked up in cross ties
What happens if there are six people all wanting to tack up at the same time? In a racing yard there might be twenty plus horses all being exercised at the same time!
So how do you hold the horse while you walk away to get the saddle? My saddles are too nice to set on the floor.
I have always had horse on cross ties and put on saddle. Then put halter around neck to put on bridle.
Removing put halter around neck and remove bridle. While reins are still around neck I put on halter, remove reins and cross tie. so horse is secured to remove saddle.
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post #62 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 12:54 PM
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See if you have always tacked up in cross ties you will do things differently..same as if you have always tied to a rail, ground tied or always tacked up in a stable.

English rider in England 90% of the time I tacked up in the stable, Carry tack to stable, put saddle on half door, go in close door, put on bridle, then pick up saddle put it on. Coming back in, saddle off, onto half door, then bridle. Often dealing with martingales or breast plates so easy way to do it. I now find it very frustrating because everywhere seems to have sliding doors, so can't park the saddle there.

Now, I always put my western saddle on first, usually hang the bridle on it while I clean feet, etc....for some reason I have got in the habit of groom, saddle on, then pick feet, then go get hat, body protector etc, then put bridle on......she is tied in the barn aisle BTW.

It really does not matter, you do what the discipline, tack, facilities etc call for, as with everything else horse based, lots of ways to do stuff
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post #63 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 01:08 PM
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I usually put my saddle over the door unless its got a fixed grille of some sort and then it will go tight into a corner where its unlikely to get trodden on. If I have a horse that's not been taught to stand still when being groomed and tacked then it gets tied up
I'm sure you'll find that the British way of doing things all comes from the long standing tradition of horses being ridden in a running martingale or a breastplate so even when you don't use one the same routine is still followed. Martingales are still considered to be part of the hunting 'uniform' and the British Pony Clubs were historically attached to a local hunt
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post #64 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by churumbeque View Post
So how do you hold the horse while you walk away to get the saddle? My saddles are too nice to set on the floor.
I have always had horse on cross ties and put on saddle. Then put halter around neck to put on bridle.
Removing put halter around neck and remove bridle. While reins are still around neck I put on halter, remove reins and cross tie. so horse is secured to remove saddle.
You put the bridle on first then put the halter on over the top - simple.

As Jaydee says, you can put the saddle on the stable door or in a corner or on the floor, if it goes on the floor then it needs to be flat if left resting, knee rolls down, the girth should be lifted so the cantle is not on the wall.

As for cost of the saddle, most of mine have a value of $2,000 plus, never marked or harmed them.
I have seen people put a saddle on the horse's back leaving the girth undone whilst they bridle because they have a martingale to fix, the horse has moved and the saddle fallen underneath.

In the UK a child would fail the Piny Club C test for saddle on before bridle.
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post #65 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 01:40 PM
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As far as not walking around in the front of the horse but walk around behind instead. I have been told this in the past and when I asked why the answer was, "the horse could strike out as you go by". This is true but I personally think it more likely for a horse to kick out as you walk behind it.
I have always ducked under my horse's neck to get to the other side as I find it quicker and no more dangerous than going behind. Of course I know my horse and am positive it won`t strike out (or kick for that matter), I would be more careful working with a horse I don`t know.
Does anyone know why it is not good to walk around in front of a horse
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post #66 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Woodhaven View Post
As far as not walking around in the front of the horse but walk around behind instead. I have been told this in the past and when I asked why the answer was, "the horse could strike out as you go by". This is true but I personally think it more likely for a horse to kick out as you walk behind it.
I have always ducked under my horse's neck to get to the other side as I find it quicker and no more dangerous than going behind. Of course I know my horse and am positive it won`t strike out (or kick for that matter), I would be more careful working with a horse I don`t know.
Does anyone know why it is not good to walk around in front of a horse
Someone that came here said that to me when we had a horse out in the middle of the barn for saddle fitting. She's been taught it but wasn't sure of the logic either.
I suppose a horse could jump forward and flatten you if it suddenly panicked but the risks of it kicking at a bug as you walked past its hind end are just as high
Common sense should tell us that you always stay on high alert around any horse.
When a friend of my sons was here a few weeks ago he wanted to 'hang around' with the horses, his first time ever. We tied Honey up outside of her stable for him to groom because she's the sort that is unlikely to move even if they were dynamiting just outside and she loves being pampered and messed with. I thought I gave him all the health and safety blurb about watching out for the front and rear ends when he went from one side to the other only to look over at how he was getting on a little while after I left his side to see him crawl under her belly to get to her other side - since I'd not thought to point out that doing that was a real No No he'd opted for it as the safest route
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post #67 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
You put the bridle on first then put the halter on over the top - simple.

As Jaydee says, you can put the saddle on the stable door or in a corner or on the floor, if it goes on the floor then it needs to be flat if left resting, knee rolls down, the girth should be lifted so the cantle is not on the wall.

As for cost of the saddle, most of mine have a value of $2,000 plus, never marked or harmed them.
I have seen people put a saddle on the horse's back leaving the girth undone whilst they bridle because they have a martingale to fix, the horse has moved and the saddle fallen underneath.

In the UK a child would fail the Piny Club C test for saddle on before bridle.
I don't think that sounds simple. Working around reins and bit to put on a halter sound like too much work unless you have a very oversized halter. If I have something that attaches to the girth I put saddle on loosly girthed, put on bridle, loosen girth for attachment.
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post #68 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
I usually put my saddle over the door unless its got a fixed grille of some sort and then it will go tight into a corner where its unlikely to get trodden on. If I have a horse that's not been taught to stand still when being groomed and tacked then it gets tied up
I'm sure you'll find that the British way of doing things all comes from the long standing tradition of horses being ridden in a running martingale or a breastplate so even when you don't use one the same routine is still followed. Martingales are still considered to be part of the hunting 'uniform' and the British Pony Clubs were historically attached to a local hunt
Mine would want to pull it off the door to play.
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post #69 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by churumbeque View Post
I don't think that sounds simple.
Believe me it is as simple as it could be, even a child can do it, I know I have taught loads of kids..easy peasy

Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque View Post
Mine would want to pull it off the door to play.
I guess horses in England are trained better then? I mean seriously....there was the odd horse that you would not leave a saddle on the door, but most of them simply not an issue, they just stand there and you tack them up. Of was hard, if saddles got wrecked, it would not be the practice.
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post #70 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Woodhaven View Post
As far as not walking around in the front of the horse but walk around behind instead. I have been told this in the past and when I asked why the answer was, "the horse could strike out as you go by". This is true but I personally think it more likely for a horse to kick out as you walk behind it.
I have always ducked under my horse's neck to get to the other side as I find it quicker and no more dangerous than going behind. Of course I know my horse and am positive it won`t strike out (or kick for that matter), I would be more careful working with a horse I don`t know.
Does anyone know why it is not good to walk around in front of a horse
Wow, first time I've heard the recommendation to send a child around behind the horse. That's a major no-no where I teach.

We actually station volunteers at the horses' flanks to make a physical barrier to going around behind when grooming or tacking!

We send kids around the front -BUT- no ducking under the crossties or limbo-ing under the horses neck. You walk a couple of paces past the crossties and proceed around to the other side. We instituted the "no limbo" rule because we had kids shimmying under the neck and banging the horse under the jaw with their helmets, no fun for the saints we use in the therapeutic riding program!
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