Removing saddle before bridle after riding? - Page 9 - The Horse Forum
 375Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #81 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 09:33 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,684
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
that's why you don't tie it to things it can pull out of the ground. if the tie bar isn't that strong, tie it to a couple of loops of bailing twine attached to the tie bar. they will break, but only if the horse pulls back very hard, and usually a horse that has been taught to release to pressure, once they hit the end of the rope and feel the halter dig in at the poll, they give.
Everyone here who uses cross-ties (and ALL the boarding stables do, as well as many private barns) use the quick-release snaps. That way, if a horse panics, it can actually get away, but they really have to yank hard to make them give out. I've never actually seen it happen (but then again, all the horses I've ever had to deal with stood quietly on cross-ties). Having used them for years, I wouldn't want to go without them and will have them in my own barn. They are just incredibly convenient because the prevent the horse from moving sideways into a wall, lowering its head to eat stray pieces of hay on the ground, or putting themselves into a corner like they tend to do in a stall. Having the horse centered in the aisle with is head in a natural position makes it easy to groom and tack him because you can walk all the way around without having to move the horse all the time. Now, if you're tacking up outside, I assume you don't have this problem, but tacking up in a stall is annoying to me because it's harder to maneuver around the horse.

As for ducking under the horse's neck, I totally get why that's not a good idea, but I have to confess that I do it all the time with horses I know well and trust. But I don't see why you couldn't walk around in front of the horse's head. Especially given that the bridle and saddle rack are in front of the horse so you have to go there anyway to get all the tack.

I wouldn't put a saddle down on the floor because I'd be worried the horse or rider (or mom!) would step on it and/or trip. We always use a saddle rack when we remove it, then once the horse is put away, we tuck it into our locker properly. However, the saddle rack was actually on the right of the horse when he was standing in the cross-ties and the coach told my daughter to take the saddle off first. Not sure how she was supposed to walk around the bridled horse holding her saddle and still maintain control over him. Remember, the horse was not wearing anything but a bridle and wanted to go into his stall. Sure, I can hold him, but I'd rather have her learn to handle him herself.
Whinnie likes this.
Acadianartist is online now  
post #82 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 11:12 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,229
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms View Post
"... if it is tied is because if you duck under its head you might startle it causing it to pull back."

Ok, it pulls back and...what? What is the negative outcome?
Have you seen a horse "pull back?" It's a serious thing, I've seen it happen several times so I understand why a person might want to avoid the chance of it happening. You'd think it would be only horses that don't know how to tie, but two of the times I saw it happen it was with horses that had tied solidly for many years.

Horses cope very well with what we ask them, but if they get so afraid that their instincts take over, they will fight terribly to get loose. One horse I saw at a trail ride was battling a trailer and his halter didn't break for the longest time. We couldn't get in there because his hooves were pounding against the metal and he was throwing his head violently back and forth.

The issues are that the halter can release suddenly, and the horse can fall backward and hit his head. The halter can also damage the horse's face or he can hurt his neck. Even quick release knots can get too tight to release when a horse pulls back.

One of my own horses pulled back once, and when my very strong friend could not release the slip knot, the metal buckle on the halter finally broke and my horse fell under the tie rack. Then she stood up right under the rack and knocked herself unconscious. She was OK, but I used a tie blocker ring for awhile to make sure it wasn't going to happen again. Her face was cut a bit from her nylon halter but she thankfully did not injure her neck vertebrae or break any facial bones.
I will never tie a horse solidly in a rope halter, because they are too strong to break. Horses are strong enough to break the metal pieces on a nylon or leather halter.

I also like cross ties but we don't have any right now. I do not use them on slippery surfaces such as concrete because I've had friends tell me about horses that have reared and flipped over in the cross ties, my friend saw one horse die after hitting her head when she went over.

The longer you're around horses, the more you realize ways they can hurt themselves. I've seen a horse cut his head open rearing and hitting a light bulb you'd think was way too high for a horse to reach. I've seen a horse cut all the skin off his lower leg on the handle of his water bucket. I've seen a horse scrape her eyeball on a nearly flat screw head in a stall. I've seen a horse scrape the skin off her back coming out backwards under a butt rope in a trailer. My horse one morning was wearing her plastic grain pan around her leg, somehow she'd stomped her foot through it.
Golden Horse, jaydee and Whinnie like this.
gottatrot is offline  
post #83 of 134 Old 12-02-2015, 11:38 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 15,433
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
Have you seen a horse "pull back?" It's a serious thing, I've seen it happen several times so I understand why a person might want to avoid the chance of it happening.
Good question, a real full blown pull back is very very scary, you would not want to be in front.

“Never attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidity”
Golden Horse is offline  
post #84 of 134 Old 12-03-2015, 12:03 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 771
• Horses: 0
Most horses don't just pull back. They go up and throw themselves back. Then they jump forward to release pressure. You do not want to be in front of that. Trapped between a horse and a pole, wall, whatever you tie to.
Posted via Mobile Device
TimWhit91 is offline  
post #85 of 134 Old 12-03-2015, 12:16 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: southern Arizona
Posts: 12,372
• Horses: 4
"Have you seen a horse "pull back?" It's a serious thing..."

Yes. Mia did it. Once. Hard enough to break the bull snap on the lead rope and rip the 12" diameter log out of the the ground - both happened at the same time. But she didn't do all that instantaneously. And given a choice, I would have MUCH rather been in front of her than behind, since she fell down backwards when it all broke. But then, I wouldn't remain standing immediately in front, and certainly not behind, a horse who was pulling back. Heck, I wouldn't want to be close to the side of a horse doing that. There is no good place to be if immediately next to the horse...so move away when it starts!

That was also when I switched to holding the lead rope in one hand...which I've now done for 7 years. I simply didn't have any place on my property strong enough to hold her. And holding it in my hand, I didn't need to since she didn't feel trapped.

BTW - that was one of the first signs that she wasn't "perfect for a beginner"...

All three of my current horses know how to tie. I just don't see the need to do so while saddling up (or down).

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
bsms is offline  
post #86 of 134 Old 12-03-2015, 12:55 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SE Spain
Posts: 1,270
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms View Post
That was also when I switched to holding the lead rope in one hand...which I've now done for 7 years. I simply didn't have any place on my property strong enough to hold her. And holding it in my hand, I didn't need to since she didn't feel trapped....

All three of my current horses know how to tie. I just don't see the need to do so while saddling up (or down).
I'm with you on this one, bsms. I tack up at the yard gate, no need to tie to anything. If the horse DID spook at anything, she'd go all of a couple of yards before coming to a halt. Why run away when you're where you want to be already?

My young horse also used to pull back when I first got her. Scared the pants off me the first time as I was picking her feet out when she tore her foot out of my hands and set back. So after that I didn't tie her solid for a long time.
Posted via Mobile Device
bsms likes this.
Bondre is offline  
post #87 of 134 Old 12-03-2015, 01:02 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SE Spain
Posts: 1,270
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainaisabelle View Post
You know what's funny until this thread I hadn't really thought about it.
That's just what I was thinking too! I never even realised that anyone who knows about horses would think of putting the saddle on BEFORE the bridle My Pony Club teachers drilled it into me from an early age that it just ISN'T DONE.

And now I discover that a whole continent of horse folks do it the other way round. Talk about a surprise! Reckon this thread has saved me from putting my foot in it if I ever go to the US. I can just see myself in my ignorance looking pityingly at all these saddle-first people and thinking where on earth they learned their horsemanship
Posted via Mobile Device
Golden Horse and jaydee like this.
Bondre is offline  
post #88 of 134 Old 12-03-2015, 02:28 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Palmyra, Wisconsin
Posts: 6,161
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bondre View Post
That's just what I was thinking too! I never even realised that anyone who knows about horses would think of putting the saddle on BEFORE the bridle My Pony Club teachers drilled it into me from an early age that it just ISN'T DONE.

And now I discover that a whole continent of horse folks do it the other way round. Talk about a surprise! Reckon this thread has saved me from putting my foot in it if I ever go to the US. I can just see myself in my ignorance looking pityingly at all these saddle-first people and thinking where on earth they learned their horsemanship
Posted via Mobile Device
I doubt anyone would notice. I don't pay attention to how someone else saddles their horse unless asked.

You'd probably be more shocked when you saw me load saddled horses in a trailer, which I do if only going for a short trip to a trailhead. I do unsaddle for the trip home though.
natisha is offline  
post #89 of 134 Old 12-03-2015, 03:25 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW UK
Posts: 15,865
• Horses: 0
All the horses travelled to and from a Hunt Meet tacked up unless they had a very long journey.
jaydee likes this.
Foxhunter is offline  
post #90 of 134 Old 12-03-2015, 04:01 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 3,493
• Horses: 1
Horse tied up, saddle always goes on first then bridle. When untacking I vary but usually saddle off first and then bridle and I put the head collar on.

Horses are always tied to a breakable string in case of puling back wiht head collar never a bridle.

But when untacking we are standing outside the stable in my yard (sort of) and my horses will all just stand even if I took all their tack off.
Whinnie likes this.

Last edited by Clava; 12-03-2015 at 04:11 AM.
Clava is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Removing Tree From Saddle: Bareback Pad? rascalboy Horse Tack and Equipment 15 11-02-2014 03:45 PM
Dressage Saddle & Bridle, Hunter Saddle & Bridle, Helmet, Spurs huntrjumprjenn Tack and Equipment Classifieds 13 07-08-2012 03:31 PM
Sudden roughed hair after removing saddle - please give advice!! livestoride Horse Tack and Equipment 8 03-04-2012 06:19 PM
Removing a logo from a saddle pad/ covering it up? eventerdrew Horse Tack and Equipment 6 03-02-2012 08:59 AM
Tack For Sale.... New Cooler, Bits, Bridle, Saddle Pad, Saddle, Etc. Riverwalk Tack and Equipment Classifieds 15 04-25-2011 09:27 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome