Rescue Horse -- Need Advice - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 21 Old 10-10-2016, 07:20 PM
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He should have a rain /shade cover . I don't get temps that low , it rarely gets below freezing in my area. In an area that gets cold, I would want an older thin horse to have a nice warm at least 3 sided area to get in.
Be sure to keep fresh water and the water 'warm' in the winter, no ice cubes , the horses do not care for freezing cold water and will drink less and can colic.
I would replace any Grain with a senior feed. The senior feed has vitamins and minerals and easier to digest.
I do not know what type of hay you feed, or what you are calling a flake of hay.
i get hay in the 3' by 4-5' bales and about a 4 " chunk is a flake and I feed alfalfa which happens to very good for starved horses as it is a good source of protein and not high in sugars as in grass hay . You do not want to overfeed a starved horse, the more small meals a day the better off . How long have you had this horse now ? do you have a way to add photos ? also,you should probably have a Vet check out this horse, and the Vet can give you an idea of his age and what could be the problem with his legs.
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post #12 of 21 Old 10-10-2016, 07:42 PM
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for some reason my last comment posted twice... so deleted this text.
Acanadian artist... I have never heard of a horse shelter not having a roof. a 3 sided shelter has a roof and three sides.
a rain /shade cover is simply the top cover . wind breaks are usually trees and shrubs.
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post #13 of 21 Old 10-10-2016, 08:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenson View Post
for some reason my last comment posted twice... so deleted this text.
Acanadian artist... I have never heard of a horse shelter not having a roof. a 3 sided shelter has a roof and three sides.
a rain /shade cover is simply the top cover . wind breaks are usually trees and shrubs.
Agreed, it would seem obvious, but I thought I would make sure the OP was aware that the roof is probably the most important part! Technically, a shelter COULD have three walls, but no roof. But that would be a wind break, not a proper shelter. Living in a cold climate, I can say that having a horse without any kind of shelter is not something I'd ever do. Again, snow isn't the worst enemy. Snow will actually accumulate over them and form an insulating barrier. Wet snow, freezing rain (falls as rain, freezes on surfaces) or very cold rain and wind are the worst.
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post #14 of 21 Old 10-10-2016, 08:15 PM
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Yes, have the vet out asap. First you obviously have NO clue (though are equally obviously well intentioned and eager to learn, that's great but not cutting it atm). For example, deworming a compromised horse incorrectly could easily kill them. The only pellets I know are daily feed through pellets, which are NOT appropriate for this situation at all. The vet needs to determine what he has for worms and give your a protocol to follow. And that's just one thing.

The number one thing ANYONE no matter how experienced does with a rescue is call the vet. And yes, a vet should be seen for his leg issues anyways, you don't wait to see if something gets worse when you have no experience.

Then issues like not having a companion, and just the overall lack of knowledge. You don't even know what you don't know and don't have ANY of the basics. This is a big undertaking and the horse (and you) can easily suffer for it. There's nothing wrong with sending him somewhere else. If you do want a horse down the road you can plan for it after knowing what you're getting into.

I would try to find someone else to take the horse. If you REALLY want to do this find a good full board barn and send him there and get a good mentor to walk you through it.

It's great that you're trying to help him, but you need to be sure you actually are helping him.

And if you're going to keep him there he absolutely must have a shelter and companion.
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post #15 of 21 Old 10-10-2016, 08:32 PM
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I'm sorry Yogi, I respectfully disagree. A person with the right amount of desire and humility can do well with a rescue horse and the bond formed can be quite remarkable. He absolutely needs a vet check, some good advice and yes, shelter and a buddy, but with the right backup I think he'll do just fine. I have. Safeguard makes a pelleted wormer that you just mix in with their feed. It's not a daily feed through wormer. I used it in the beginning when I wasn't practiced at using the syringes. Maybe you're right and a lot of people could get overwhelmed by not really knowing what they're getting into. But. Determination, desire and the willingness to take advice and learn learn learn go a long way. Just my opinion.
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post #16 of 21 Old 10-10-2016, 09:06 PM
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I never said the OP couldn't form a remarkable bond with the horse but that is absolutely irrelevant.

I agree IF this is going to be done you need "backup" the problem is that's obviously not in place atm.

The Safeguard I didn't know about but that doesn't change anything I said.

I agree the OP has a good mindset, but the horse will be the one to suffer for it. Even experienced people shy away from a horse in bad condition, and the OP doesn't even know if he needs SHELTER let alone anything else.

As I said IF the OP is serious about doing it, then things need to change and the OP will need to go "all in", which is also very expensive and hard work.

Out of all animals horses are the most easily killed with kindness.
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post #17 of 21 Old 10-10-2016, 09:37 PM
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I agree with Yogiwick on at least finding a mentor if you are determined to keep this horse and learn about good horse keeping routines. Horses are NOT dogs, and they have very sensitive stomachs, need routine vaccinations yearly, and farrier care along with unique handling and training needs simply due to their size. In order to help a horse when you are at ground zero, you really need someone who can walk you through the steps whenever an issue comes up, help you through the rough spots, explain what you are doing right and what you're doing wrong, and take charge when the horse has your number and is being a PIA. A 1000+ pound PIA is not fun to deal with but it happens too often because newbies are afraid to correct the horse or don't even recognize when the horse is testing the boundary of good behavior.


In the meantime, start cleaning out an area in that barn for the horse's stall, stock up on good quality hay to feed him over the winter, look into Senior feeds since they are complete (meaning they include forage, grain, and vitamins and minerals) and easy to digest (look on the feed tag so you know how much to feed him for his ideal weight), and contact the vet to give a physical, run an FEC, and treat his leg.
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post #18 of 21 Old 10-11-2016, 07:25 PM
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I guess I lucked out and did a few things right, the biggest one being I was clueless, I knew it and I begged for help anywhere I thought I might find it, including here. In theory, I agree with everything you guys have said. It IS a lot of work, and scary, and yes it can go wrong. I'm just not sure that the first advice to give someone in a situation is "you're in over your head, get out of the pool." You'd be surprised how fast someone who's motivated can learn to swim. But then again, this involves an animal who is totally dependent on a person being able to learn quickly. Gah, I'm sitting here arguing with myself haha. I shouldn't have scolded you, you're absolutely right. Just, knowing how it feels to be that totally helpless, clueless new horse owner who's begging for help and they receive a response like yours...it kind of feels like horse people think they belong to a select club to which very few can belong. Which may be true to an extent as well....what I do know is it's become a way of life for me in less than a year and I'm soaking up knowledge wherever I can find it. I have been very lucky, but a lot of my luck stems from my determination to do right by my animals and my willingness to read, ask, learn etc.

What I know for sure is that if I had heeded a lot of the advice I was given here a year ago, I wouldn't have the horses I have now. I wouldn't have the pride of seeing my two young horses go from skinny and terrified to happy and healthy. It is not a commitment to be taken lightly or entered into without some kind of idea of the work (and costs) involved. Yeah, so I'm rambling on top of arguing with myself lol. Nothing to see here, folks, carry on. :P
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post #19 of 21 Old 10-11-2016, 07:43 PM
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Anything is better than what he had! Kudos to you for taking on this horse many would turn away. <3 I would certainly have a vet come out and assess him. If you are blanketing at home, it's easy peasy! Most blankets come with a "how to" for temperature changes and there is certainly google. I applaud your effort, OP.
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~And He created the horse and said to it, "I have made thee without equal."~
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post #20 of 21 Old 10-11-2016, 10:54 PM
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You've gotten good advice so far, OP. I'd like to add (and I may have missed this if you mentioned it already) -- I assume that you purchased the horse and received a bill of sale??? It's tempting in the bad luck cases to just get the victim out of the bad place asap but without documentation it can come back and bite you at some future point when you've gone to all the time, effort and expense to get the horse back in good form and the former owner decides to claim him.
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