Riding for 8 months now - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 32 Old 01-19-2015, 04:00 AM
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Originally Posted by iayyub View Post
I guess I need to explain more 6 months I had 3 lessons a week for 45 mins each and now for the last 2 months I have 2 lessons a week so that makes me like 66 hours of ridding.

The reason is why I want to buy a horse is that I just cant think of anything else except horses I am so hooked and cant find the right people to talk to about them-
That makes absolutely NO difference. 66 hours of riding is really nothing, I know girls who rode twice a week for 8 months who are just mastering all three gaits.

I'll ask again... have you looked into leasing? You get more experience, more ride time, without the massive expense and commitment of owning a horse. I think it's a good second step for anybody who wants to own, especially someone who only has 8 months of experiences.


@skiafoxmorgan what you say is true of some horses BUT to find a good dead-broke horse that's young enough to stick with a rider for the long-term as they advance and who will allow a rider to advance past the beginner-stages and not get bored is going to cost you a fair bit more than your average beginner-broke horse.
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post #22 of 32 Old 01-19-2015, 05:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iayyub View Post
I guess I need to explain more 6 months I had 3 lessons a week for 45 mins each and now for the last 2 months I have 2 lessons a week so that makes me like 66 hours of ridding.

The reason is why I want to buy a horse is that I just cant think of anything else except horses I am so hooked and cant find the right people to talk to about them-
Are they only riding lessons or do they teach you ground work (to gain respect from your horse) , lunging and stable management?
If it is only ridden lesson you need to gain some experience in lunging (will be very practice skill to know), you need to know how to care for your horse (health, feed, tack, mucking out, etc)

I've bought my horse after one year of private lessons and going on a lot of hacks, horsey holiday (full days in the saddle) , I have part loaned two horses in that time.
I have ridden a least 25 different horses in the first year.
I have to admit, it would have been better if I had waited maybe another year before purchasing my first horse. I still have weekly lessons with my horse but being a novice rider I have thought some bad habits (by not being absolutely consistent) to my horse so we have regressed and I am working hard to get back to where I want us to be (which is basic walk-trot-canter and some small jumps). It took a year of had work to work out what to do when he was napping when going out on our own...he still naps but I now know what to do. His napping was basically turn back and canter back home, going backward, bucking (more recently when I use my crop), no moving at all,etc He will try everything, the only thing he has not tried yet is rearing. When you have your horse you have to work through those issues.
I lot of people would have decided to sell their horse at that point but I know the problem is me and not my horse...my horse requires a confident rider or he will take advantage.

I think your next step is looking at part loaning a horse, you will see if you can really put the time into if and you will gain more experience.
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post #23 of 32 Old 01-19-2015, 08:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexischristina View Post

@skiafoxmorgan what you say is true of some horses BUT to find a good dead-broke horse that's young enough to stick with a rider for the long-term as they advance and who will allow a rider to advance past the beginner-stages and not get bored is going to cost you a fair bit more than your average beginner-broke horse.
well, THAT part is true. :( I haven't discussed price with my horse's owner yet. I am gonna wait until I've had her a while before I broach that topic. Copper is only rising 9 now, so still in her prime. She has had medical issues with cellulitis, which retired her from jumping. I'm hoping that keeps her price low--that and a good relationship with the owner.

Most horses her age are just beginning to get the sillies out. Copper seemed born broke. Her owner bought her as a broke two-year-old for her 10 or 11-year-old. Never regretted it. She's as sane and honest as a horse twice her age. So yeah. I suppose if you want beginner-safe and young and athletic, that's going to cost ya.

I admit I'm thinking more towards the 11+ range for the second horse, when that time comes: something everyone else in the family can ride. (I'm a jealous owner and don't wanna share Copper.)
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post #24 of 32 Old 01-19-2015, 03:07 PM
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Any lesson barn that is able to give you 3 lessons a week(!) has got to have some sort of leasing options available? I agree with alexischristina -- this is the most obvious next step which would achieve your goal (more ride time) while also keeping your expenses predictable.

If you are unfamiliar with leasing in general, a partial lease is simply a contract you enter into with the owner (the lesson barn in this case) that specifies what you'll pay/month (IN ADDITION TO YOUR LESSONS!), and how many days a week you may ride this particular horse outside of your lesson times, with the understanding that he is not being ridden by anyone but you in those lease windows. Outside the lease window, the horse would (presumably) be used in the lesson program.

The above is just a very high level guide -- leasing arrangements are as unique and customized as any other contract! Variations could include separate billing for vaccinations and farrier care, the days available (you may not be given a choice, just told you can have Tuesday and Thursday), restrictions on the activities (no jumping, for example), etc.

Leasing is a much more natural next step to achieve your stated goal (more ride time) than taking on ownership. You absolutely do not have to jump from lessons into horse ownership just to get more time to ride.
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post #25 of 32 Old 01-22-2015, 08:23 AM
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In Opinion leasing is just like renting a waste of money you might as well be standing at Walmart giving it away,rant over I say find you a good broke horse and go for it good horses still sell so when your ready so move up so to speak put them on the market and buy you another
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post #26 of 32 Old 01-22-2015, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackboy View Post
In Opinion leasing is just like renting a waste of money you might as well be standing at Walmart giving it away,rant over I say find you a good broke horse and go for it good horses still sell so when your ready so move up so to speak put them on the market and buy you another
Unfortunately your statement is not true...telling a person who may not have all the skills to properly take care of a horse to just go out and buy one, you get bored or outgrow it sell it and get another one. A horse IS NOT a car or an object, they are a living, feeling, breathing animal.

We do not know if this person has been around horses before this..do they know basic medical care of ownership? Even boarding you have to have some basic knowledge of what is going on...worming...bandaging..hand walking...stall rest...shots...what to do for colic, etc.

Keeping your own horse on your own property...do you have enough acreage? Do you have a run in shed at the least or a small barn? Place to store hay, grain, supplements, your tack. Can you afford a saddle? Do you know how one fits and if yours does fit the horse? Can you bridle without hitting their teeth? Are your fences horse proof? What is the land like? How about neighbors, are they friendly enough to not complain about smell or do something ignorant? Is your land even zoned for ag? Outlet for water, where do you put the trough?

Kiss taking holidays good bye. Anyone trusting enough to watch your horse while you are gone? Do they have a basic working skill of a horse sitter?

So very much to owning you own horse....just some things to think about.
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post #27 of 32 Old 01-22-2015, 10:58 AM
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Unfortunately your statement is not true horses are objects just like any other livestock and they are bought sold traded given away and so forth. Some people think you need to have years of experience 1000 acres millions of dollars to own horses.when we got my first horse I knew nothing just as my parents did brought him home got on him a galloped him down the side of the road now I know that wasn't the safest thing to do but some of us don't have the luxury of the finest things and we have to make do with what we got as I said go get you a horse learn from him and have fun
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post #28 of 32 Old 01-22-2015, 12:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackboy View Post
Some people think you need to have years of experience 1000 acres millions of dollars to own horses.
Exaggerate much there, jacky?

Experience is good not only for the horse owner, but the HORSE. If you have no clue what you're doing, the horse is the one who usually pays the heaviest price.

As far as having '1,000 acres and millions of dollars', hardly. However, if you don't have the money or resources to care for the horse properly, again, it's the HORSE that suffers the most.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackboy View Post
go get you a horse learn from him and have fun
Except they might not, and get badly hurt or dead.

The OP is under no obligation to lease, but some yahoo saying, 'Sure go ahead and just get any old horse without knowing anything, 'cause it'll be just fine.' is bad advice.

If the OP wants to buy a horse, she/he will. However, those of us who were properly educated, cultivated the right experiences, and taught to ride by professionals would be completely remiss if we didn't advise her that it may not turn out well.
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post #29 of 32 Old 01-22-2015, 06:53 PM
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YIKES. That's all I have to say to this recent turn in the conversation. I learned to ride by taking a horse from the barn (I was told which one) and reading a book on how to put on a hackamore. then I hopped up bareback and went on my journey. I fell. A lot.

Was that ideal? God, no. I was freaking lucky I didn't get myself killed. When I moved into owning, I was lucky enough to have the sense to read, not be too Disney-fied, and humble enough to ask questions of vets, farriers, barn owners, and other boarders. And LISTEN to the answers.

Telling someone to just go get a horse and learn on it? I've seen the result of that. It's not pretty.

No matter. There are plenty of people like Jack in the world. They just aren't my people.
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post #30 of 32 Old 01-22-2015, 08:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackboy View Post
Unfortunately your statement is not true horses are objects just like any other livestock and they are bought sold traded given away and so forth. Some people think you need to have years of experience 1000 acres millions of dollars to own horses.when we got my first horse I knew nothing just as my parents did brought him home got on him a galloped him down the side of the road now I know that wasn't the safest thing to do but some of us don't have the luxury of the finest things and we have to make do with what we got as I said go get you a horse learn from him and have fun
Not in my house! Horses are bought and kept and loved and cared for. FOREVER!

But I agree, you don't need a bunch of money or a fancy place or even a million hours of riding time. You need a safe place, enough money to care for your horse, and a network of people such as friends, trainers, vets, even a horseforum to help you when you need it.
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