Riding this horse for the 1st time. - The Horse Forum
 33Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 16 Old 08-09-2014, 08:10 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 4
• Horses: 0
Riding this horse for the 1st time.

Hi Horse People, I rode horses as a teenager back in the late 60's - early 70's (trail riding- farm) but haven't ridden as an adult so I wouldn't consider myself as an experienced rider. I'm retired now & have just took in a TW that needed pasture & a good home here on the farm. The owner
said the horse was gentle & anyone could ride him (gelding). She also told me he hadn't been ridden in several months but should not be a problem because
he was gentle. I've had him for 2 wks but haven't tried riding him. Any advice from more experienced horse folks on how to go about this situation. He has an old mare as a pasture buddy but we don't ride her.
Thanks for any advice, DRJ
Dirtroad Johnson is offline  
post #2 of 16 Old 08-09-2014, 08:39 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 21,911
• Horses: 0
Gday,

Have you got any horsey friends or neighbours, or the owner, that can come for support? That would help, to have an experienced person with you to start with. Do you have a saddle(that fits him), or are you going bareback?

Sounds like you're unsure of yourself a bit, and unsure of the horse, so I'd just do it in 'baby steps' & check him out along the way. How is he on the ground? Does he listen to your requests? Yields well? I'd get that going better if not. Then you can see what he's like to get on & off. Don't make a big deal out of it, just get on & off a few times, or until you're both confident & relaxed about it. Then you can get on & stay on for a bit, bit of a walk, then off again. If you do it like this, far less likelihood of things getting 'tight', so you can check the horse out & get back into the swing, and you can minimise the likelihood of bad associations & reactions & both get more practice at being comfortable with eachother.

It is like riding a bike... but if you haven't ridden one of those for 20 years it can be a tad tricky to begin with too!
loosie is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 08-09-2014, 10:18 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Oregon
Posts: 427
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Gday,

Have you got any horsey friends or neighbours, or the owner, that can come for support? That would help, to have an experienced person with you to start with. Do you have a saddle(that fits him), or are you going bareback?

Sounds like you're unsure of yourself a bit, and unsure of the horse, so I'd just do it in 'baby steps' & check him out along the way. How is he on the ground? Does he listen to your requests? Yields well? I'd get that going better if not. Then you can see what he's like to get on & off. Don't make a big deal out of it, just get on & off a few times, or until you're both confident & relaxed about it. Then you can get on & stay on for a bit, bit of a walk, then off again. If you do it like this, far less likelihood of things getting 'tight', so you can check the horse out & get back into the swing, and you can minimise the likelihood of bad associations & reactions & both get more practice at being comfortable with eachother.

It is like riding a bike... but if you haven't ridden one of those for 20 years it can be a tad tricky to begin with too!
great advice here..


I do want to add, even the most gentle horse can test you and take advantage if the handler is nervous, or just out of practice. I have been helping a couple of ladies at the barn who are in a similar situation as you, their horses tested them, and one almost got dangerous. If you are not 100% sure of what you are doing (confidence level), then get someone to help...if you need to pay for help, fine, its cheaper than hospital and vet bills.

good luck, and welcome back to hands on horsemanship
sorral3 is offline  
post #4 of 16 Old 08-09-2014, 10:49 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,727
• Horses: 0
Do you have any horsey friends that can help? I would enlist an experienced horse person to help you on the first ride. He'll be fine in all likelihood, but you, understandably giving the hiatus in your riding, seem to have a lack of confidence. Perhaps consider paying a trainer to be present for the first few rides while you get your horse legs back. They'll be able to help if you have issues, and if you don't need them you won't have lost anything.
Posted via Mobile Device
DuckDodgers is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 08-09-2014, 11:54 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 4
• Horses: 0
Thanks for the replies, I appreciate your input.
Dirtroad Johnson is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 08-09-2014, 02:01 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 13,258
• Horses: 5
I would have someone else ride this horse a few times before you get on. I have seen "seasoned" horses be ridden by beginners or even seasoned riders and horror stories coming out of it. If the horse is that easy to ride, it shouldn't be a problem for them to put a few refresher rides on first for you.
I don't think people realize or remember how physical horseback riding is either. Having been off for a long period of time will make you a lot weaker of a rider than you might first realize

I have no doubt you will really enjoy it, but I strongly suggest to take a more safe approach.
loosie, HagonNag, Pagancat and 1 others like this.
my2geldings is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 08-09-2014, 02:19 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: East Central Illinois
Posts: 7,135
• Horses: 3
All great advice above. When we bought 15yo "Tyke", (TWH/QH, 1970-1998, RIP), 1985, he had been a teenagers horse that she had lost interest in, and when I tried him I felt very confident. BUT, I didn't have a trailer yet, so I paid a girl where I was renting pasture space to get him from there to me. I went with her, and she took her good old time loading him, with the assumption that he might be trouble. It looked like she had studied with CA bc she led up to, then away from the trailer, then loaded just his front feet, and waited, then backed out. It took her about 10 minutes to load him. He was no trouble, but she didn't know that.
It is ALWAYS wise to be careful. Get a trainer or experienced friend to run through everything with this horse, from tying, to grooming, to feet, to backing him, to riding him, and keep that person there to give you a few lessons on your new horse.
This girl showed her two QH's and I had a lot of respect for her. She didn't talk much, but demonstrated her knowledge and wasn't interested in criticizing you for what you didn't know, just interested in helping, if asked.
Look for someone like her to help you out. =D
loosie and HagonNag like this.

A Jack and Three Queens, the latest book by James C. Dedman, Amazon.com
Hope that you fall in love with "Trot", like I did! https://www.horseforum.com/general-of...queens-617793/
Corporal is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 08-09-2014, 08:03 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 21,911
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by My2Geldings View Post
I don't think people realize or remember how physical horseback riding is either. Having been off for a long period of time will make you a lot weaker of a rider than you might first realize
Reminds me of a quote I saw recently, that went something like... 'I'm really attracted to a girl who rides horses... until I remember she can probably snap my neck with her thighs!'
loosie is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 08-09-2014, 11:19 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Posts: 258
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Reminds me of a quote I saw recently, that went something like... 'I'm really attracted to a girl who rides horses... until I remember she can probably snap my neck with her thighs!'
LOL

On a more serious note, I feel you on the nervous front when getting on a horse you don't know for the first time. I agree with above in seeing how he is on the ground with you and getting someone experienced to be there with you for moral support and pointers. One last thing I would do before getting on is maybe a quick lunging session - not to tire him out or "take the edge off" per se but tack him up like usual and lunge him at the three gaits a little in both directions. That way if he's got any funny "quirks" or reactions, or decides to for instance throw a hissy fit when asked to canter, at least you won't be on him when it happens.

That way you'll know a bit more about what could go on when you do get on, and can decide whether you want to ride him after all or maybe have someone a bit more experienced give him a refresher if he's being particularly naughty. That's just my 0.02$ though!
Corporal likes this.

"If you act like you've only got fifteen minutes, it will take all day. Act like you've got all day, it will take fifteen minutes."
-Monty Roberts
Alexandra V is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 08-11-2014, 09:41 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Canada eh?
Posts: 870
• Horses: 0
Definitely do some groundwork with him first. He might be perfectly fine and not need a refresher but it will help you get to know him and his temperament =)

There are plenty of good groundwork videos out there that you could learn from and use or if you know anyone that would be willing to help out you could do that too.

Good luck =)
Posted via Mobile Device
WildAtHeart is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
backing a horse for its 1st time miggiemoon Horse Riding & Horse Activity 2 08-01-2013 10:13 PM
1st time trail riding in almost a year! TheAQHAGirl Trail Riding 3 06-17-2013 09:49 PM
1st time on the new horse tell me what you think! Mimi loves Horses Horse Riding Critique 7 04-23-2012 07:20 PM
My Daughter riding by herself for the 1st time DisneyCowgirl1901 Horse Pictures 18 09-12-2009 06:52 PM
Possible buys for 1st time horse owner missy06 Horse Riding Critique 54 09-14-2008 01:31 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome