Should I get a horse? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 37 Old 05-02-2017, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jillianrose View Post
I started reading all the books I could get my hands on about horses. I moved up to articles, than YouTube videos. I consider myself knowledgable, but not experienced.

I'm at least going to get a few more lessons before buying my first horse, but do you think I should buy an older well trained horse, or wait a few years then buy an un-trained 2 year old(which is ultimately what I want)?
That is very exciting that you are going to be taking lessons soon.

However, you are asking a very, very beginner questions. It is not a good idea to buy a horse after only taking a "few" lessons. It is also not a good idea to buy an untrained young horse when you don't even know how to ride yet.

You have dreams and aspirations and that is good, but you are getting WAY ahead of yourself. One step at a time. Excitement and enthusiasm are great -- but be realistic too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jillianrose View Post
My goal is to get to the Olympics!
It's good to have goals, but one step at a time.

Step 1) Lean how to ride. And learn how to ride WELL.
Step 2) Maybe buy a horse ... an older horse who will be a good teacher for you and has "been there done that". But who will pay for the horse? Where will you keep it? What will you do when you maybe go to college? There are lots of IFS in there. I would advise you not to actually BUY a horse until you are in your mid-20's and have a steady job.

I'm not saying your goal is not attainable, but most Olympic riders have deep pockets. It is very expensive to ride at that level. Those caliber of horses have six figure price tags. Not to mention, it is few and far between for horses that have the talent to make it to the Olympics.
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post #22 of 37 Old 05-02-2017, 10:49 AM
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There is an old saying, green on green = black and blue. You are at this stage a very early beginner. You have the drive, you have the fire, and you have goals. You don't have experience. Take the time between now and High School graduation to take as many lessons as you can, learn to really ride. Also, spend as much time at the barn, not taking lessons, as the BO will allow. Observe, listen, and help with the day to day care/needs of horses. That will help you get that experience you really need. I will give you an example. I used to keep my horse at a ranch that belonged to my friends, she trained horses, taught lessons, and sponsored a bunch of kids so they could show/rodeo. She had a college kid that was her catch rider, absolutely brilliant rider. Catch rider came in talking about how sluggish horse x was, took her temp she was running a fever, rider never knew it, heck never even considered it. At the same time she had a Mexican kid, who couldn't ride a lick, but he could tell you if any horse took the slightest wrong step. My point is knowledge and experience aren't the same thing

FYI, it is spelled W-H-O-A.
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post #23 of 37 Old 05-02-2017, 11:26 AM
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In response to the poster that was looking at a draft as a first horse because they are slow and steady - realize that perception does not translate into reality especially if this is a horse you are riding. Depending on how much experience you accumulate you may or may not be ready. A big horse moves big no matter what. They aren't always slow and steady. There strides are big, their spooks and starts are big and their reactions are big when they do react. Many are hot headed and cold backed. That is not to say you won't find a jewel but I can't tell how many times I have seen that mistake made by a new horse owner. Be it a young (or even older) person with little experience with drafts or a parent that has always heard how calm and gentle they are so buy one for their kid. You get that proud new horse owner until their child ends up in the hospital from a fall that would have likely been a non event off of a smaller horse. Many compound the error by buying a young, green draft or cross so the child and horse can grow together. It happens most with those interested in riding. IME Those that are starting out with drafts learning to drive typically start with a BTDT horse or team. Get experience with drafts or even the crosses, as they can be a handful and because of their size those that are do not belong in the hands of an inexperienced horse owner, before making a decision. Then do your research and spend time with the horse you intend to purchase.
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post #24 of 37 Old 05-02-2017, 11:30 AM
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I think you've gotten a lot of good advice especially on the expenses and experience needed prior to getting a horse.

You will change so much in your first year of riding, especially if you are taking multiple lessons a week and doing private lessons. The horse that works for you the first year probably won't be the horse that works for you in 2 years. You do not want to buy a horse that is not a good fit for you long term. And to find out what is a good fit you need to ride different horses and get different experiences, find out the style you want and what type of style you want to do.

After a year and a half of lessons, my daughter started half leasing a horse that ultimately did not work out for her. We loved the horse (still do) but it wasnt a good fit. Which was fine because it was not our horse and we just ended the lease. She then had the opportunity to lease a different horse who we thought would not be a good match at all but she gave it a try and it has been going very well. It would have been very unfortunate if we had bought instead of leasing- we would have picked the wrong horse even after over a year of lessons. Especially while you are young you change so much physically and mentally that it can be tough to know what will work for you long term. To make it even more confusing, if we hadn't leased the first horse, my daughter probably wouldn't have realized the second horse was a good match for her! I definately recommend leasing prior to owning - but even before that you need some quality lessons and lots of horsey experience.

best of luck!
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post #25 of 37 Old 05-02-2017, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
In response to the poster that was looking at a draft as a first horse because they are slow and steady - realize that perception does not translate into reality especially if this is a horse you are riding. Depending on how much experience you accumulate you may or may not be ready. A big horse moves big no matter what. They aren't always slow and steady. There strides are big, their spooks and starts are big and their reactions are big when they do react. Many are hot headed and cold backed. That is not to say you won't find a jewel but I can't tell how many times I have seen that mistake made by a new horse owner. Be it a young (or even older) person with little experience with drafts or a parent that has always heard how calm and gentle they are so buy one for their kid. You get that proud new horse owner until their child ends up in the hospital from a fall that would have likely been a non event off of a smaller horse. Many compound the error by buying a young, green draft or cross so the child and horse can grow together. It happens most with those interested in riding. IME Those that are starting out with drafts learning to drive typically start with a BTDT horse or team. Get experience with drafts or even the crosses, as they can be a handful and because of their size those that are do not belong in the hands of an inexperienced horse owner, before making a decision. Then do your research and spend time with the horse you intend to purchase.
Quote:
You betcha!But after looking at info about them, and riding a couple, I've decided I like heavy set horses better (from that experience at least).
I put that bit in bold to show you I wasn't assuming all drafts were the same! :)
I see where you are coming from, however. I have seen two drafts start bolting when they came close to a water-crossing while hitched to a wagon, as well as one bolting when a baby on it's back screamed. I do have (a little) experience driving, as I learned that before riding, and (a little) experience riding them. All I can say from those experiences, as few as they may be is that I preferred them. End of story. Even if they are more dangerous, I just said I preferred them, to clear up confusion.

As for them being slower or always calmer, that wasn't what I said originally. I just went off of what Kimargue said, because correcting her was not in my best interests, haha!
No, I would say drafts can be very difficult, and fast when they feel like it. Once, I was charged with making sure a Belgian didn't wander off, for a few minutes, and geez! It was so strong, and super hard to keep away from the mules.

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post #26 of 37 Old 05-03-2017, 11:43 AM
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Hey there, kudos to you for going after your dream!

My advice is to wait. I'm 18, and I bought my first horse when I was 14. My parents paid to buy him and I have paid for everything since then (board, feed, hay, vet, farrier, tack, treats, etc). While I love my horse to death, and there was no way I would not have bought him... if I could go back with the same knowledge I have now, I would have waited. Especially as you are trying to learn more, spend money on riding a bunch of horses at lesson & gas to get you to the barn rather than one horse. Olympic riders may have owned horses, but they didn't learn everything they know from riding one horse. They learned from riding hundreds of horses and taking lessons! So, I would say wait until you know a lot more, and get that 2 year old when the time comes.

In addition, I'm heading for college & trying to figure out how to tag my horse along!

With that being said, don't rush getting the 2 year old. Take your time and learn as much as you can. Save your money and get the horse when the time is right.

Good luck!!
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post #27 of 37 Old 05-03-2017, 01:43 PM
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Leasing is most likely your best bet. You'll have a chance to get intimately acquainted with a lot of different horses without being "stuck" with them. It'll help you to form a solid opinion about what you are actually looking for in a horse, not what you *think* you are looking for right now. In addition to your formal lessons, leasing a number of horses at a rescue place, giving them some care, arena work, and trail rides, may give you the necessary experience for a sound purchasing decision while helping to rehabilitate those horses to find a home. What's more, you may be able to get involved in the training process and get some hands-on experience on the ground as well. There will always be horses, and if you think about wanting to be the best owner/care taker you can be for "The One", waiting to buy makes sense, in my opinion. In the end, you should have a solid answer to the question, "How are you the best owner for this horse at this time?"
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post #28 of 37 Old 05-03-2017, 11:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jillianrose View Post
Thank You for your advice RedDunPaint! I will certainly start a journal once I get my license and start moving closer to my dream. Also I love your name! Is that an actual color? It sounds gorgeous!

Awesome I'll be sure to read it!

And yes, it's an actual color Tessa is a red dun tobiano, which is one of the color patterns of a paint horse. It's my absolute favorite color! I think they're absolutely beautiful, though I may be biased
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post #29 of 37 Old 05-06-2017, 05:47 PM Thread Starter
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What about a mini horse?

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post #30 of 37 Old 05-06-2017, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jillianrose View Post
What about a mini horse?
IMO, they are about the same amount of work, live as long, but are only half as useful.
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