Slapping a horse in the face? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Bluediamond View Post
Anyway, she reached for his face and he thought she had a treat and reached forward with his teeth. Not like a snapping motion, he just sort of lifts his lip and reaches forward, mouth slightly open.
This, I do not blame her for hitting your horse. If she truly thought the horse was about to bite her, that's the exact discipline that my horses get. It is very effective to stop a biter.

However, with that said, unless I know the owner very well, I am not about to slap someone else's horse unless I am 100% positive that I am in danger.

Either way, this situation I could potentially brush off b/c she may very well had thought the horse was going to bite her.

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Originally Posted by Bluediamond View Post

So anyway, I finished tacking, but went to ask my teacher for help with the bit

My horse sees her and his ears go back and he starts backing up. She has the bridle with bit in one hand and grabs him by the halter and tries to jerk him forward, but he's backing up. She slaps him hard, in the face, and yells angrily at him. I mean, so angry it sounds like she's screaming.
This is NOT at all acceptable. You do not slap horses when you are trying to bridle them. There is no acceptable training method that uses that. I would tell your trainer about this incident and request that this girl no longer works with you or your horse, and that she should be examined closely for working with the rest of the horses.

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post #22 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 05:20 PM
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A horse that's being a little pushy and asking for a treat will usually have its ears forward in anticipation - just takes a firm 'No' or a bump on the nose to deflect the plan - though if it wasn't my horse and the owner was holding the horse I'd step back and let then deal with it
If a horse is coming at you intent on doing you some harm they'll have their ears back and look like they mean it
If a horse has been allowed to be demanding for treats and even encouraged by giving them one when they get pushy then its effectively been trained to do it, when someone comes along and suddenly punishes them really harshly for it they're confused and you can end up with a horse that's either head shy or becomes defensive - and the OP's horse actually displayed a bit of both when the teenager approached her again
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post #23 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 05:22 PM
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I have been in your shoes, when I felt too ignorant to stop some authoritative person from doing something awful to my animal. I feel bad for a long time when that happens, because I gave my responsibility away and my animal, who is mine to protect, suffered for it. When you are learning, it just happens sometimes.

Bridling is very easy on a well-broke horse like yours. If you are moving slow I can't imagine hurting a horse's teeth, and slow is the only way you should be moving. It is a gentle procedure.

It's a simple but coordinated movement in which your right hand holds the top of the headstall, from between the horse's ears, while your left hand offers the bit by placing it gently against the teeth right where he is going to open his mouth. A trained horse will lower his head when you put a little pressure on his poll, and will open his mouth for the bit when he feels the bit against his teeth.

Important: if you want to learn how to do something, don't ask someone to demonstrate, ask someone to tell you how, step by step, as YOU do it. A lot of this stuff is just learning a physical routine.
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post #24 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 06:43 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Avna View Post
I have been in your shoes, when I felt too ignorant to stop some authoritative person from doing something awful to my animal. I feel bad for a long time when that happens, because I gave my responsibility away and my animal, who is mine to protect, suffered for it. When you are learning, it just happens sometimes.

Bridling is very easy on a well-broke horse like yours. If you are moving slow I can't imagine hurting a horse's teeth, and slow is the only way you should be moving. It is a gentle procedure.

It's a simple but coordinated movement in which your right hand holds the top of the headstall, from between the horse's ears, while your left hand offers the bit by placing it gently against the teeth right where he is going to open his mouth. A trained horse will lower his head when you put a little pressure on his poll, and will open his mouth for the bit when he feels the bit against his teeth.

Important: if you want to learn how to do something, don't ask someone to demonstrate, ask someone to tell you how, step by step, as YOU do it. A lot of this stuff is just learning a physical routine.
Thank you for the empathy and the advice. I will try to be more confident.
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post #25 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 07:01 PM
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First, YOU should learn that one should never hit a horse with one's hand. Horses are big, boney creatures, and hitting a horse with your hand is more liable to result in an injured hand than hurting, or even phasing, the horse.

I think you should practice putting on the bridle.....most bridling problems caused by inexperience seem to come from UN bridling...yanking the bit out of the mouth, or letting it drop and get caught on their teeth. Hold it UP, by the headstall, until the horse opens his mouth to let the bit drop.

Good luck!
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post #26 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 07:04 PM
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You don't actually need confidence as much as the determination to learn, no matter how nervous and awkward you feel. Confidence will come with ability.
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post #27 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by greentree View Post
First, YOU should learn that one should never hit a horse with one's hand. Horses are big, boney creatures, and hitting a horse with your hand is more liable to result in an injured hand than hurting, or even phasing, the horse.

I think you should practice putting on the bridle.....most bridling problems caused by inexperience seem to come from UN bridling...yanking the bit out of the mouth, or letting it drop and get caught on their teeth. Hold it UP, by the headstall, until the horse opens his mouth to let the bit drop.

Good luck!
I'm learning that from this thread, but that is what I had assumed, even when I saw that girl hit him. I have never needed to strike my horse. He's just really well trained.
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post #28 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 07:30 PM
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Blue diamond, you are doing a super job by your horse! He is lucky to have you as an owner.
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post #29 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 09:15 PM
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I was going to say the same thing as Avna.....have someone watch you bridle him and they can coach you. Once you do it a couple of times yourself it will be fine. You are so lucky to have such a great horse!
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post #30 of 56 Old 10-29-2015, 09:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greentree View Post
First, YOU should learn that one should never hit a horse with one's hand. Horses are big, boney creatures, and hitting a horse with your hand is more liable to result in an injured hand than hurting, or even phasing, the horse. ......

Good luck!
I respectfully disagree to a point. It would be difficult to injure your hand slapping a horse with your open palm. I do advise folks to never hit a horse with your fist or kick one. You are much more likely to break your hand or foot than make an impression on the horse.
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