Slapping a horse in the face? - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
 176Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #41 of 56 Old 10-30-2015, 01:28 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: U.S.A. East
Posts: 197
• Horses: 1
I certainly agree with everyone else, the girl was TOTALLY out of line with how she handled bridling your horse. Even when dealing with a difficult to bit horse, I have NEVER felt the need to smack it! I hope you did say something to someone in authority over her. She is one that I would closely watch around the horses. I don't care how much she thinks she knows, she obviously doesn't.
Whinnie likes this.
MomH is offline  
post #42 of 56 Old 10-30-2015, 06:53 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,124
• Horses: 2
Bluediamond, I feel for you. I'm a new horse owner too (well, my first horse in 20-some years so might as well be my first ever I guess). I understand your reluctance to step in, and I concur with everyone who says this girl was out of line, but what do I know. :) I also feel like an idiot half the time. Yet I am a professional who isn't used to feeling like this, but there it is. When it comes to horses, I don't know as much as other people. But maybe, just maybe, they don't know everything either. Ask a lot of people's opinions, but pick and choose which ones you follow.

I guess my point is that you reaction was understandable and your desire to check with more experienced horse people on this forum was the responsible thing to do. It does sound like you haven't quite asserted yourself as this horse's new owner and that this might be the real root of the problem. Given that, as I understand it, this horse lived at this stable before you bought it, that's not really surprising. But if you wish to remain there, you may want to assert your ownership. This can be done overtly or in a lot of little ways. Go there by yourself and spend time alone with the horse. Do not allow anyone else to handle him without your permission (except for things like feedings, blanketing if you do that, and turnout). Learn to bridle so you can ride him alone - it doesn't sound like he is a high-risk horse to ride, you should be able to do a walk/trot without a trainer present every time. Put your name and contact info on the front of his stall so everyone knows you are the owner now. In other words, you need to assert yourself as his owner and protector. Do as much as you can for him - don't doubt your abilities, if you're not sure, ask someone to show you. At a point, you just need to step into those shoes and "own" this!
natisha, egrogan, JCnGrace and 4 others like this.
Acadianartist is offline  
post #43 of 56 Old 10-30-2015, 08:40 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Binghamton, NY
Posts: 8
• Horses: 1
No

No no no no. You never slap a horse in the face ever unless they are actually coming at you ears pinned going to bite you. Then my first reaction is a slap in the face. Preferably a elbow if anything so they do t get all flinchy if someone gets near their head. That was totally wrong. I wouldn't rat her out but know I'm your mind to never do that to a horse.
Aurora5858 is offline  
post #44 of 56 Old 10-30-2015, 10:07 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines
Posts: 2,173
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Textan49 View Post
In most instances the reprimand does not have to be given hard enough to possibly hurt your hand. While presenting the right body language, a light slap accompanied with a stern "NO", gets the point across. I have seen young children that don't have the strength to hit hard manage to do this effectively.
Agreed.
Cordillera Cowboy is online now  
post #45 of 56 Old 10-30-2015, 10:49 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines
Posts: 2,173
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by greentree View Post
Not if you hit a bone....I just make it a practice NOT to. Heck, I got a pillion fracture of my knuckle on my horse's neck landing after a jump!
To clarify, I'm talking about an open handed slap, which is not likely to cause physical harm to horse or human. I completely agree that HITTING a horse (closed fist) is likely to break the hand and make little to no impression on the horse. I'd compare your jumping injury more to the closed fist type strike. (I'm assuming here, so lots of room for error). You were likely holding the reins in your closed fingers. Hopefully not in a clench fisted death grip. But the force of landing after a jump is exponentially higher than anything one could exert in an open handed slap.

Kicking is in the same category as hitting with a fist to me. I recall my mercurial tempered uncle who kicked a horse in the belly for some small misdemeanor. My uncle ended up in a cast up to his hip for his trouble.
Cordillera Cowboy is online now  
post #46 of 56 Old 10-31-2015, 12:55 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: mercedes, tx
Posts: 38
• Horses: 0
My horse has on occassion been too pushy. On the rare occassion he wants to bite or get rough I will slap his nose and say "No". This is not a hard slap or even a screaming "no". It is a quick action that gives him a jolt. He usually calms down right after and I go back to petting and cuddling. He holds no resentment for it and he is not harmed by it. In my opinion there is a right and wrong way to do it. The point is to not express your frustration but to correct a bad behavior at the exact moment it happens
natisha and Cordillera Cowboy like this.
javi is offline  
post #47 of 56 Old 10-31-2015, 01:24 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 548
• Horses: 0
I am sorry but if someone slapped any of my ponies in the face ... they would slapped back in the face pretty sharpish... I dont believe in violence to animals full stop !!!

There are plenty of ways to encourage good behaviour by sound ridden and handling on the ground ....

If you have to resort to violence I suggest you read up more !!

TRAIL RIDING HOURS IN THE SADDLE

..37 hours 20 mins totaĺ 2016 !!! .2017..7 hour 15 mins
Fellpony is offline  
post #48 of 56 Old 10-31-2015, 01:43 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 739
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by natisha View Post
Some people get so hung up on the "respecting my space" thing that they don't learn to read a horse. They want horses to interact with them but be a statue at the same time.
When my best friend bought her first horse she kept him at a stable and took lessons there. I watched my mild mannered, quiet friend turn into a terror any time her horse so much as shifted a foot in the wrong direction. The instructors there drilled into her that every move the horse made that wasn't directed was "disrespectful" and needed to be punished. Once he gave her a nudge with his head as she was standing by him and she freaked out screaming and hit him. "He's not respecting my space" was what she said when I questioned her. The horse, basically, should have been a statue unless she was actively working with him.

I felt so bad for that horse. Their relationship went continuously down hill until she moved him and got different instruction.
natisha, egrogan, Fellpony and 1 others like this.
tinaev is offline  
post #49 of 56 Old 10-31-2015, 05:30 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Temple, Georgia, USA 🇺🇸
Posts: 1,241
• Horses: 3
I haven't even read the whole OP, and certainly not not the whole thread, but my opinion- It's okay to slap a horse just enough to give him a little scare. But don't smack him, at least not in the face. Think about how a mare might pin her ears and nip at her foal because he got on her nerves or something, versus a horse kicking another horse for stepping out of their line in the pecking order. For a simple bite attempt, just be like the mare-nipping-her-foal thing.
As for when your horse flipped out after that girl smacked him, I don't blame him. And that girl NEVER should have hit him because he was scared of her- that ASSURES him he should be scared!
In this situation, you've done nothing wrong. Just try to keep her away from your horse. You did better than me- I would've returned that slap right back to her- or at least given her the equivalent in very heated words. LOL

Here's what I'd do next.
1. Pay attention to the other boarders. Find ones you like and agree with.
2. Try to make friends with the people you've found, and maybe get some of their phone numbers.
3. Go to those boarders for advice from now on. Don't just ask for any barn girl. Talk to them specifically.
4. Never let that girl that slapped him back around him again. If she insists, just tell her you can handle it.

These things are why I am so glad I have my own barn. Then again, PawPaw and and I get in arguments all the time. LOL
LilyandPistol is offline  
post #50 of 56 Old 11-01-2015, 12:04 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Hamilton, New Zealand
Posts: 2,038
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
Bluediamond, I feel for you. I'm a new horse owner too (well, my first horse in 20-some years so might as well be my first ever I guess). I understand your reluctance to step in, and I concur with everyone who says this girl was out of line, but what do I know. :) I also feel like an idiot half the time. Yet I am a professional who isn't used to feeling like this, but there it is. When it comes to horses, I don't know as much as other people. But maybe, just maybe, they don't know everything either. Ask a lot of people's opinions, but pick and choose which ones you follow.

I guess my point is that you reaction was understandable and your desire to check with more experienced horse people on this forum was the responsible thing to do. It does sound like you haven't quite asserted yourself as this horse's new owner and that this might be the real root of the problem. Given that, as I understand it, this horse lived at this stable before you bought it, that's not really surprising. But if you wish to remain there, you may want to assert your ownership. This can be done overtly or in a lot of little ways. Go there by yourself and spend time alone with the horse. Do not allow anyone else to handle him without your permission (except for things like feedings, blanketing if you do that, and turnout). Learn to bridle so you can ride him alone - it doesn't sound like he is a high-risk horse to ride, you should be able to do a walk/trot without a trainer present every time. Put your name and contact info on the front of his stall so everyone knows you are the owner now. In other words, you need to assert yourself as his owner and protector. Do as much as you can for him - don't doubt your abilities, if you're not sure, ask someone to show you. At a point, you just need to step into those shoes and "own" this!
Well said

... and you can do this bluediamond, you have the caring, and you can ask and research for the learning :)
ShirtHotTeez is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Face highlighter on white face horse? MakeMeAMemory Horse Grooming 6 02-19-2013 06:56 PM
Lets see your bald face/wide blaze/blue eye/apron face horses sommsama09 Horse Pictures 46 12-18-2012 12:04 AM
On my horse face HELP!! please :) mistysms Horse Health 3 08-13-2012 01:21 AM
was this horse owner being ridiculous? re:patting horses=slapping a person dirtymartini Horse Training 106 05-06-2011 03:50 PM
Face to Face Picture Contest inaclick Horse Contests 39 07-03-2010 05:51 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome