So green! - The Horse Forum
 9Likes
  • 3 Post By Avna
  • 2 Post By NomadicgypsyAmy
  • 1 Post By NomadicgypsyAmy
  • 1 Post By tinyliny
  • 1 Post By NomadicgypsyAmy
  • 1 Post By newtrailriders
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 10 Old 08-27-2017, 04:22 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 6
• Horses: 0
So green!

Hi all, new to this forum and new, again, to horses. Quick background, 6years ago we moved to a horse property. My husband and his parents (who lived with us) had quite a bit of horse experience, but I had none. I bought this horse that was SO GREAT FOR BEGINNERS ... I'll never fall for that again lol. She wasn't and I ended up falling/bailing off her on my first ride after she bolted.

Fast forward to now, after years of traveling, we settled down in northern Arizona. I started lessons last month, mostly to get past my fear. I work with an amazing Appaloosa, Nic, but the trainer is ... well, she's an old cowgirl. I have serious panic attacks, sometimes for a day or two.

If anyone has been through this and has advice, that would be great! And, I want my own horse again!!! Still have quite a bit of fear, though.

So, my question. She lives fairly close to me and has said I could board when the time came. Thing is, I might be getting snobby watching YouTube! Everything is a huge mess there. My husband wants to be another .5 acre adjoining to put horses (they'd have almost an acre). I feel it's too small for 2-3 horses and there aren't any trails in our neighborhood. We can ride at her place, like 100 acres. There are a couple of other places to board within 15 miles but I haven't seen them yet.

Am I missing any questions for wherever I end up boarding?
NomadicgypsyAmy is offline  
post #2 of 10 Old 08-27-2017, 05:42 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Western Massachusetts
Posts: 6,442
• Horses: 3
First part: find a trainer who is good with working with riders who have confidence issues. If your current trainer isn't that person, take a break from her and go look for someone who is.

Do not look for a horse to buy until your confidence is back. One thing at a time. Go with someone who has experience, understands what you are looking for, and whom you trust completely. Get a PPE.

Horses can be kept on small properties, you just have to clean up after them constantly. If you want to trail ride, you probably should plan on boarding at a place with trail access, though.

Short horse lover
Avna is offline  
post #3 of 10 Old 08-27-2017, 05:44 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 10,326
• Horses: 12
The basic rule is 2 acres per horse but where you are at that would likely not be enough. Contact your county extension agent and ask about how many would be able to be kept with minimal input. It will I suspect be quite a bit more. You would end up with nothing more than a dry lot and be feeding/haying all year instead of just part of the year. If you would not have convenient trials to ride out to then I would look at boarding if all you had access to was an acre for the horses. If what you are interested in is trail riding then ask about how close the nearest trials are, can you ride on their property, what is the boarding arrangement (cost, self or full care, turn out, feed - you supply or them , same for hay). That would be a start. Oh, is there someone available for lessons or training if you decide that becomes a need.
QtrBel is offline  
post #4 of 10 Old 08-27-2017, 06:29 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 6
• Horses: 0
My trainer is very matter of fact, but she's also worked with others who have a fear. Mostly, her demeanor gives me a bit of confidence. Mostly, though, Nic is training me to relax and enjoy the ride and that my former horse was not a good choice for me to learn on.

Oh, and no, I won't even start to look for a horse until I am confident with more than just Nic.

Thanks for the input so far and suggestions!!
loosie and AnitaAnne like this.
NomadicgypsyAmy is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 08-27-2017, 08:18 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 21,911
• Horses: 0
Hi & welcome!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NomadicgypsyAmy View Post
I work with an amazing Appaloosa, Nic, but the trainer is ... well, she's an old cowgirl. I have serious panic attacks, sometimes for a day or two.
Not sure what you mean by this, but I get the idea you're not comfortable with your instructor & she pushes you too far out of your comfort zone so you panic? If that's the case, but you like her, I'd talk to her about it! Tell her how you're feeling & that you want to take things slower. If she can't 'come to the party' & teach you at a level you're comfortable with, then find another instructor who can - you won't gain more ability - & therefore confidence - without pushing your boundaries a little, but by the same token, you won't if you push too far either.

Plenty here - including me - have been through, or are working thru fears of riding. Some, like you, are 'newbies', some, like me, have ridden & trained horses for years fearlessly, before something happened & we suddenly became fearful. I reckon the best way through it is 'stretching' your comfort zone in 'baby steps', just like you'd treat a horse that was afraid of something.

Start at whatever level you ARE comfortable at. If it's only sitting on a stationary horse, so be it. Then do a little more than you're comfortable about, but return to your 'comfort zone' *before* you become seriously concerned. This might be just walking on the horse. So ask him to walk on, even for a few metres to start with, before asking him to stop again. Do this repeatedly until that's your new 'comfort zone' & you can do it without any worry. Then ask for a little more - further or faster, whatever. Depends how you're feeling as to how fast or slow you might push yourself. Don't worry about what you 'should' be able to do.

Don't know that I'd rush to getting your own horse yet, until you gain more skill & confidence, but depends on what support you have...

Quote:
feel it's too small for 2-3 horses and there aren't any trails in our neighborhood. We can ride at her place, like 100 acres. There are a couple of other places to board within 15 miles
Yeah, that size property is way too small for a couple of horses, if you want them to have grazing - they will have eaten it out in no time if on it permanently & need feeding. But even on bigger property a few horses on permanently will eat out the grass & need hay for at least part time. And living on your property with free access to hay is fine - & will be way cheaper than boarding. If you divided it into a few paddocks, &/or only give them part time access to the most, then depending on land, climate etc, you could manage so they have a little grazing regularly, not trash the whole paddock.

If your horse is at home, you'll have far more time, without pressure, to get confident with them, but if you're going to board, I'd be keeping him somewhere with a good instructor close by, because it sounds like you're not ready to ride alone yet.

NB. didn't see your update before I posted above.
loosie is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 08-27-2017, 08:29 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 6
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Hi & welcome!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NomadicgypsyAmy View Post
I work with an amazing Appaloosa, Nic, but the trainer is ... well, she's an old cowgirl. I have serious panic attacks, sometimes for a day or two.
Not sure what you mean by this, but I get the idea you're not comfortable with your instructor & she pushes you too far out of your comfort zone so you panic? If that's the case, but you like her, I'd talk to her about it! Tell her how you're feeling & that you want to take things slower. If she can't 'come to the party' & teach you at a level you're comfortable with, then find another instructor who can - you won't gain more ability - & therefore confidence - without pushing your boundaries a little, but by the same token, you won't if you push too far either.

Plenty here - including me - have been through, or are working thru fears of riding. Some, like you, are 'newbies', some, like me, have ridden & trained horses for years fearlessly, before something happened & we suddenly became fearful. I reckon the best way through it is 'stretching' your comfort zone in 'baby steps', just like you'd treat a horse that was afraid of something.

Start at whatever level you ARE comfortable at. If it's only sitting on a stationary horse, so be it. Then do a little more than you're comfortable about, but return to your 'comfort zone' *before* you become seriously concerned. This might be just walking on the horse. So ask him to walk on, even for a few metres to start with, before asking him to stop again. Do this repeatedly until that's your new 'comfort zone' & you can do it without any worry. Then ask for a little more - further or faster, whatever. Depends how you're feeling as to how fast or slow you might push yourself. Don't worry about what you 'should' be able to do.

Don't know that I'd rush to getting your own horse yet, until you gain more skill & confidence, but depends on what support you have...

Quote:
feel it's too small for 2-3 horses and there aren't any trails in our neighborhood. We can ride at her place, like 100 acres. There are a couple of other places to board within 15 miles
Yeah, that size property is way too small for a couple of horses, if you want them to have grazing - they will have eaten it out in no time if on it permanently & need feeding. But even on bigger property a few horses on permanently will eat out the grass & need hay for at least part time. And living on your property with free access to hay is fine - & will be way cheaper than boarding. If you divided it into a few paddocks, &/or only give them part time access to the most, then depending on land, climate etc, you could manage so they have a little grazing regularly, not trash the whole paddock.

If your horse is at home, you'll have far more time, without pressure, to get confident with them, but if you're going to board, I'd be keeping him somewhere with a good instructor close by, because it sounds like you're not ready to ride alone yet.

NB. didn't see your update before I posted above.

Oh! I should've said that I'm in Arizona! Most places you can't expect to really graze!

My trainer is fine, she's just very brusque. I get panic attacks before I go. Once I'm on my way, they lesson almost or even to nothing. It's the idea that it's coming!
loosie likes this.
NomadicgypsyAmy is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 08-27-2017, 10:38 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 48,201
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
The basic rule is 2 acres per horse but where you are at that would likely not be enough. Contact your county extension agent and ask about how many would be able to be kept with minimal input. It will I suspect be quite a bit more. You would end up with nothing more than a dry lot and be feeding/haying all year instead of just part of the year. If you would not have convenient trials to ride out to then I would look at boarding if all you had access to was an acre for the horses. If what you are interested in is trail riding then ask about how close the nearest trials are, can you ride on their property, what is the boarding arrangement (cost, self or full care, turn out, feed - you supply or them , same for hay). That would be a start. Oh, is there someone available for lessons or training if you decide that becomes a need.

that rule is relevant only if you are grazing the hroses. we have lots of places around here that have only a shy acre, and on that they have their own house, driveway, garage, outbuildings, and a small two stall barn with tiny runin's and a tiny pasture that they let the hroses graze on an hour or two a day. Such horses eat hay, primarily, and need to be ridden almost daily. It's not ideal, but it can be done.

Please don't let Youtube influency you too soon. spend some time being teachable, and when you know a bit more, you'll be able to start picking and choosing what you feel is the best way to work with and ride horses.

I agree that more lessons are the way , for now. maybe a year of lessons, or , lease a horse for a year. You'll be more prepared . Horse ownership can be scary if you don't have a 'big sister' to help you out.
loosie likes this.
tinyliny is offline  
post #8 of 10 Old 08-27-2017, 11:39 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 6
• Horses: 0
tinyliny, I know legally we'd have enough land and if my husband can lay it all out prove there's enough room to level for a round pen, I'd consider it.

I don't know when I would actually buy a horse, but if I can find one that, after a few visits/rides and input from my current trainer and two other people I know, it may make more sense to me to be able to ground and saddle work more than once per week. I will, however, still keep taking lessons.
tinyliny likes this.
NomadicgypsyAmy is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 08-28-2017, 01:34 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 6
• Horses: 0
Thanks for the input. I thought a lot about the advice and realized my anxiety has a lot to do with the trainer. I am going to check out another place that may be a better fit, but is far more expensive.

Sounds like a fun place with someone who is a trained trainer and seems to be ready to go slowly with me. I am glad I did get pushed to get on a horse to prove to myself that not every horse wants to gallop from a standstill the second a butt hits the saddle lol

Thanks again!
NomadicgypsyAmy is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 08-28-2017, 10:31 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: KS
Posts: 443
• Horses: 0
If I was going to board, I'd want my horse to have 24/7 access to a paddock or pasture and to shelter, free-choice. Maybe that sounds demanding but there are places where horses don't get turned out unless their owners make absolutely sure it happens. Poor horses can be stuck in their stalls for days at a time. After seeing that, I just don't trust anybody and if I boarded my horse I'd have to go there daily.

Also, if there wasn't plenty of room for them to graze on grass 24/7 I'd pass on any place that didn't give them free round-the-clock access to hay - and water, of course.

I'd be looking closely at the number of horses the boarder was boarding, how clean things were kept, and how much mud I'd have to trudge through to catch my horse when I went to ride - and the amount of mud the horses have to trudge through. I don't want my horse standing in mud all day, or having to walk through knee-deep mud to get to food.

Clean, solid ground; 24/7 access to food, water, and shelter, and easy access to my horse and to trails or a riding area. Of course the place would have to be conveniently located and willing to let me visit my horse any time day or night. It would probably be easier to keep a horse in a small area than to board.
loosie likes this.
newtrailriders is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Green & green makes black and blue.. will this end well? OnAMission Horse Talk 3 12-18-2014 05:41 AM
Green on Green = Black and Blue, well so does Green and Gold! Golden Horse New to Horses 54 05-13-2014 12:13 AM
First Time Working with a 2YO; Green + Somewhat Less Green=Chance of Success? ilyTango Member Journals 7 08-27-2010 07:50 PM
Why Green Riders and Green Horses DON'T Work. ChingazMyBoy Horse Training 16 04-05-2010 08:07 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome