Starting to look - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 10-14-2016, 10:19 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Virginia
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Starting to look

Hello,

I am just starting to look into getting a horse. Most likely a lease with lessons. I have about a million and one questions. My husband has agreed to buy me a horse next year if I so desire. I fear however with only two years of lessons and leasing a horse one other time it would be a big commitment and I couldn't pick the right horse. My son (2.5) is also intrested in horses. At what age should I start taking him to lessons? I would be keeping the horse/horses at a boarding facility near our house. If I buy a horse what all cost do I need to keep in mind? I'm looking at a year or more in the future. Just doing research now to be better prepared. I can't start lessons now either as I am pregnant which is the other reason I'm waiting at least a year to buy/lease a horse. Thank you so much for your time and advice. :)
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post #2 of 12 Old 10-14-2016, 10:32 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: SC
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How exciting! Our last duty station was NOVA. Are you NOVA? Price gets heftier there. ;) Leasing a horse is a great idea! There are many options out there but if I were you, I'd look at a straight lease, like 3-4 days of riding a week and that's the only financial commitment. Horses kept correctly are expensive. $300-450 a month for "full care board" where you don't ever have to show up if you don't want to. In NOVA, we paid $200 a month for pasture board. Hoof care is a 6-8 week commitment, shoes run $80 and upwards, trims like $30-40. Dental at least yearly, if not more for certain horses, $120-$150 for power floats. Feeding varies greatly on the needs of the horse. Standard vaccines twice yearly, $25-50. In VA, I would certainly do Lyme vaccine which will run more. That's just the basics. :) That's why I would lease if I were you! When you get more experienced, then look at buying. :) Good luck!

~And He created the horse and said to it, "I have made thee without equal."~
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post #3 of 12 Old 10-14-2016, 10:36 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2
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We are by Oceana. Do they have horses for lease at Oceana? I went out there one time last time we lived here but then we had to move so I never got to look into it. I was hoping someone had some insight into the stables. I'm noticing horses are more expensive down here than michigan.
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post #4 of 12 Old 10-14-2016, 10:42 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Central Texas
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What is your history with horses up until this point?
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post #5 of 12 Old 10-14-2016, 10:42 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: SC
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I think that is coastal VA. NOVA stands for Northern VA. It's the fox hunt/steeple chase capital of the country. ;) Jackie O's hunt is there. Many high dollar barns. Prices will probably be better near you.

~And He created the horse and said to it, "I have made thee without equal."~
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post #6 of 12 Old 10-14-2016, 10:53 PM
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Join Date: May 2015
Location: Sunset, TX
Posts: 796
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Your regular bills on a safe, sound, sane horse are going to be trimming and shoes approximately every six weeks. In many cases you can only shoe the front, back or none. It really depends on the ground the horse is spending all of their time on and what they will be doing. Your Farrier or an expert horseman in your area is the best source for that info.

You will also have seasonal worming, which is pretty cheap. If you are moving around much at all, or spending time with other horses not from your herd/barn it is also important to vaccinate twice a year.

I'm not familiar with VA. Here in Texas, you have to have a Negative Coggins test to take your horse anywhere. It is a rare disease but it is pretty serious.

Grooming supplies. I like to put Equiflex or a similar product on my horse's hooves about twice a week. It isn't expensive, and keeps her already amazing feet great. She is in a pasture about 12 Horus a day with other horses. I think this combo is worth the results we are getting. Then again, who knows she might have amazing feet without it.

Blankets for winter. A cool weather blanket and a cooling sheet for letting the horse cool off slowly after being worked.

Fly care. I'm not a fan of the really potent fly chemicals, but I do use some of the serious ones during the bad fly seasons only. A horse that is being driven to the brink by dozens of flies is not fun for anybody.

I'd say that is the basic basics. It is somewhat regional. Seek out a really knowledgable horseman in your area and learn whatever you can from them. Horsemanship is like 15% riding, the rest is the care and feeding stuff and being smart with these amazing animals.

Good luck, I think you are about to have a lot of fun when you get back into it.
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post #7 of 12 Old 10-16-2016, 02:23 PM
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That would be why you ask someone to either choose a few appropriate horses for you to look at and choose from or be there to evaluate your choices and determine whether they would be a good fit for you. Your riding instructor would/should be a good place to start both when ready to buy as well as lease. As for your child there are differences in what you can or can't do with a leased horse vs an own horse as well as whether the animal is stabled on or off your property. If your child is interested then having a care giver with him at the barn during your lessons where he can pet noses and watch you ride is a good start. If you own your own horse and are on your own property then sitting him up on the horse's back and having a walker hold him up and you lead (or whichever you prefer) can give him some ride time of his own or perhaps going for short rides in front of you. On a safe mount with a good instructor, lessons during your pregnancy shouldn't be an issue. Just depends on you and the barn you are riding at. There are risks in everything you do. We each make our own choices. I rode through my pregnancy. My instructor had no issues with lessons and I actually switched from my mare to one of hers fro any and all riding that I did. I had an 18.2 hand mare at the time and did not want to risk a fall from that height not to mention mounting and dismounting was not easy. We went on an all day trail ride on our vacation during that pregnancy as well that I would have never experienced had the group we were with not refused any pregnant woman certain activities so we found our own. Instead of a two hour trail ride that amounted to nothing more than a pony lead line offered by the tour group (20+ people) we went on a true trail ride (me, DH and the guide) that started early in the morning winding up and around the side of a volcano where we had lunch in the crater and then a ride straight down followed by a tour of the ranch ending on the beach late in the afternoon. If riding for you is not an option while pregnant then you are correct it makes a good time to research. Cost is related to where you are at. So is what is available. Visit local barns and feed stores or supply shops. Talk to those in your area. Good luck and happy riding when you feel you can! ETA my son started on our horses at 2. He had his own mare at 4 and started with an instructor at 7 when he decided he didn't need to listen to me any longer. Her insurance won't allow anyone under the age of 6. Some won't start until age 8. It just depends.
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post #8 of 12 Old 10-16-2016, 04:20 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Central Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
On a safe mount with a good instructor, lessons during your pregnancy shouldn't be an issue. Just depends on you and the barn you are riding at. There are risks in everything you do. We each make our own choices. I rode through my pregnancy.
I support this, but it depends on the pregnancy. My trainer had plans to keep riding and training through her pregnancy but her body and the baby had other plans. She's having a very difficult pregnancy and can basically only walk around the house a little bit. :( Just wanted to point out there may be a reason the OP cited her pregnancy as the reason for not being able to ride now.
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post #9 of 12 Old 10-16-2016, 06:58 PM
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I understand that emoore but I wanted to point out possibilities. I have worked with women trying to avoid pregnancy, get pregnant and already pregnant for 35 years and in the last 15 here in the states I have seen the most ridiculous amount of I can't because I'm pregnants or even I can't because I had sex and I might be pregnant. It is mainly localized here in the US. The rest of the world doesn't have that same attitude. Getting pregnant is a part of life for many. Being pregnant is a part of life. But, you are correct there are some pregnancies that you would be advised against it. I thought I had mentioned understanding there is risk involved we each had to make our own choice.
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post #10 of 12 Old 10-16-2016, 07:23 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2016
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It's probably best to look for horses with your trainer if you don't have too much experience. They generally know what to look for and can find any general issues with a horse.
I think that leasing a horse for starters is the best way to go if you aren't too sure if you are ready for a horse. A few month's leasing can help you decide if you are ready to make the commitment to buying a horse. However, sometimes leasing for a long time can be more expensive than buying a horse. It really depends on the time and money you are willing to spend though. There are a few perks to both.
Leasing- Generally leasing a horse from someone will include the cost of vet bills, shoeing, tack , and other large costs so you don't have to worry about scheduling anything for your horse. Many leases offer training and lessons also. Leasing a horse also is less time consuming. It is a great way to find out more about owning a horse.
Buying- Buying a horse is a long term commitment, but it can pay off. Finding a horse and doing the pre-purchase exams can be time and money consuming but can be well worth it. You always want to make sure you are getting the right horse for you and your family. Depending on where you board, some places will offer to schedule appointments for the vet, farrier, dentist, etc. You also want to make sure that you can afford any "pop up" costs for you horse- if they injure themselves and you need a vet or they break a piece of tack, etc. But there are usually a lot less restrictions when you own a horse vs when you lease one.
It really depends on what your wants and needs are. You should talk to your trainer about what you want and he/she can help you decide on what is best.

Either way you choose to go, good luck :)
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