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post #11 of 20 Old 04-03-2015, 11:23 PM
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If you have spring grass coming through then it could be a deficiency in Magnesium causing the unusual behavior - Magnesium deficiency makes horses jumpy and behave irrationally.

When you feed her add 1 Tablespoon of Epsom Salts to her feed each day while the grass is growing hard.

My mares can get a little cranky during the first heat of the season but you can usually tell because they are peeing and winking a lot. A year or so back one of mine was so bad she had to have bute as she was so uncomfortable. She wouldn't move all day.
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post #12 of 20 Old 04-04-2015, 12:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcbjmichaelis View Post
Went out to bring my mare in so she could dry off before I put her coat back on her and she acted as if she was going to charge me and actually jumped towards me a few times. I set the lead rope down and tried again to approach but she continued to do it. Thinking it was just me my teenage daughter tried approaching and got the same result so I went and got her night feed and lead her into her stall and once there she seemed perfectly fine. I'm thinking maybe all the new spring grass could be to blame because nothing else has changed and she has never acted this way before. I'm going to leave her in and check her feet after a cooking off period. Anyone think this could be the issue?
Thoughts-

Did you give her a bath (I'm just confused as to the fact that she's wet adnt he term 'coat'). Something with that could be annoying her.

Your mare tried to charge you and you not only ignored it but put down the "weapon" you were holding. Of course she would try again.... Dangerous behavior and a response encoraging it.

Her feet shouldn't be relative to the behavior but it's good to check them over every now and then. I'm missing why you think that's relevant though.

Has she been transitioned onto the grass slowly?

Sometimes they just get a little fresh in the spring. I know I'm feeling a bunch better!

Regardless the behavior is very dangerous and will escalate- it needs to be dealt with promptly and firmly. Be ready next time.

I don't see the behavior as something mare specific so doubt it's hormones though regardless that's no excuse.
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post #13 of 20 Old 04-05-2015, 03:08 PM
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Here is a article you might want to read before giving anything to your horse in the "magnesium" family....
I came across it when my horse came up deficient and needed a supplement...
Hope it helps...
Feeding magnesium to horses - Health - Horsetalk.co.nz
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post #14 of 20 Old 04-05-2015, 04:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Here is a article you might want to read before giving anything to your horse in the "magnesium" family....
I came across it when my horse came up deficient and needed a supplement...
Hope it helps...
Feeding magnesium to horses - Health - Horsetalk.co.nz
Sorry but the first sentence is a load of rubbish. Magnesium Sulphate has been used for centuries to give to horses for many problems. It is good stuff.

Whilst the more modern, more expensive 'others' are supposedly better for horses the original Magnesium Sulphate actually works better.

I've used it for decades and when used to deal with Magnesium deficiency it's quick and cheap and people are more likely to continue to use it to help their horse.

The best recipe I was given by an old stockman was to give the affected horse twice daily 1 Tablespoon each, Epsom Salts, Baking Soda, Dried Yeast and Dried Thyme.

When one of mine went down with grass staggers, this mix worked faster and for longer than the very expensive commercial treatment.

I have read somewhere that the cheleting process is harmful.
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post #15 of 20 Old 04-05-2015, 11:24 PM
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Good article to better understand difference sources, etc I reckon Horselovinguy. Confused by your response above Tnvas - "Sorry but the first sentence is a load of rubbish. Magnesium Sulphate has been used for centuries to give to horses for many problems. It is good stuff."

Which first sentence are you talking about?? "Epsom salts, or magnesium sulfate, is becoming an increasingly common supplement for horses." or maybe "Magnesium plays an important part in nerve and muscle function, and horses deficient in this important element can show signs of nervousness, wariness, excitability, and muscle tremors."
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post #16 of 20 Old 04-06-2015, 03:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Good article to better understand difference sources, etc I reckon Horselovinguy. Confused by your response above Tnvas - "Sorry but the first sentence is a load of rubbish. Magnesium Sulphate has been used for centuries to give to horses for many problems. It is good stuff."

Which first sentence are you talking about?? "Epsom salts, or magnesium sulfate, is becoming an increasingly common supplement for horses." or maybe "Magnesium plays an important part in nerve and muscle function, and horses deficient in this important element can show signs of nervousness, wariness, excitability, and muscle tremors."
Magnesium Sulphate and Epsom Salts are one and the same thing. The comment made was in regard to the first sentence in the article that refers to Magnesium Sulphate becoming an increasingly common supplement for horses. it's always been in use and is an important salt to have in the first aid box
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post #17 of 20 Old 04-06-2015, 05:52 AM
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And this is why I'll never own a mare again... My 2 old mares were horrible when they were in season. My last girl was the most loving sweet mare ever with impeccable manners, until she came into season when she would corner you, double barrel you in the stable, bite you as you walked past, jump out her field to get to the geldings etc. She was HORRIBLE. I gave her Oestress and it helped a lot, I also put her out with my gelding who quite honestly couldn't give a monkey's when there's a mare next to him squirting, she got bored when he wasn't paying her any attention - he was more interested in his sheep friends that were out with them.

I'd personally give her a hormonal supplement (Agnus Castus is pretty good) and push her about rather than her pushing you about. Not being aggressive - just putting her in her place by being assertive, keep walking towards her, take a schooling whip just to tap across her chest if she runs at you and just not give her the chance, I'd probably get a trainer in to help if she's your first mare as well.
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post #18 of 20 Old 04-06-2015, 06:10 AM
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Seems a bit of an academic nit in the article to pick on. Yeah, I know Epsom is Mg Sulph. & for people that didn't know that, the article did say so. Yes, I know Epsom salts has long been popular for various things, but it has been my experience, that since a lot of recent studies on supping extra Mg, it is indeed becoming even more commonly supped to horses, and also in human medicine. I'm not sure that for eg. it was commonly given to heart patients or diabetics more than a decade or so back, certainly wasn't routinely given to horses for the sake of 'EMS' & hoof development until reasonably recently.
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post #19 of 20 Old 04-06-2015, 07:42 PM
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Please don't give your horse hormone supplements without having your vet determine it's a hormone issue.

Just because it's April doesn't auto make all issues hormone issues...

As I said I didn't see anything mare specific there and can just as easily see a gelding in the same position so don't know why people are jumping to "hormones". Imo most "mare issues" are training issues anyways unless there is a genuine medical reason in which case a vet should be involved.
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post #20 of 20 Old 04-13-2015, 06:43 PM Thread Starter
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Just to update my mare is doing just fine now and is back on her daily schedule with the addition of raspberry leaf added to her feed. Her bratty disposition is for sure due to her being in season. As far as it being wrong to stall her at night it is in this case best for her and does not bother her at all, in fact she is much calmer since we started this and has taken to the routine really well. She is a rescue and requires daily handling and hoof care. Due to the wet weather here in Washington it ensures her feet are allowed to dry out. She goes into her stall willingly and even closes the door(half door). A few weeks ago my son didn't latch the door to the paddock very well and she figured out how to not only let herself out but she locked all of the goats in,lol Thank you for all of the advice but I think we have this situation figured out. This is my first season with Mares as I've always had geldings so I appreciate the help.
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