Terminology help... - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 35 Old 11-23-2015, 07:18 PM
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Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
You are confusing the meaning of the 'lead' in canter for the one that's often used to describe the leg that a horse lifts first when going into a trot.
If you're riding on a circle and you automatically rise on the first stride that the horse makes in trot - the 'leading' stride then its important if you want to be on the right diagonal that you recognize which leg you're posting on
No, I am not. The trot does not have leads. The human can have diagonals
Show me one English equitation pattern where the word 'lead' is used in any trotting. It is incorrect terminology There is no leading leg, although there is a diagonal pair and you can set a horse up for a correct lead departure at a canter, but for a trot, the rider will first sit, then pick up the correct diagonal, depending on direction
Most people do not have the strength nor does the horse have the training, to start from a two point position, as this pattern calls for
GoHorseShow.com | Breaking Down the Congress Patterns: Hunt Seat Equitation - GoHorseShow.com

At any rate, if you wish to say find your diagonal according to lead stride legs,( inside front, outside hind) that is one thing, but to say a horse has leads at a trot is incorrect Any show I have ever been at, or any clinic I have ever taken, confines the word 'leads to the canter and diagonals for the trot
Never heard anyone that knows their equitation , ever tell someone that they are on the wrong lead at a trot. They are told that they are on the wrong diagonal.
Never in a rail class, have even been knocked down if it takes two strides to get that right diagonal, versus a wrong lead departure at the canter
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Last edited by Smilie; 11-23-2015 at 07:24 PM.
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post #32 of 35 Old 11-24-2015, 01:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Golden Horse View Post
They are indeed muddy waters, but I have to say the only time I hear "wrong lead" is when I'm messing up yet another canter depart.

Messing up my posting...."wrong diagonal," or a sigh and "sit a beat"
One coach I use says on the wrong lead. The other on the wrong diagonal.

And they can both say turn right and I automatically go left, or as they tell me, " my other right."

As I said I brought it because the word lead might sneak in a lesson while trotting.
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post #33 of 35 Old 11-24-2015, 01:38 PM
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Well, you can find your correct diagonal, by watching that shoulder, but neither shoulder or feet lead, but alternate evenly every other stride.
I have always been told to watch that inside shoulder, to find my diagonal
At any rate, terminology aside, as most coaches know what they really mean, my point was that horses have leads at canter/lope, by the very nature of that gait, but not at the trot, although it is showring accepted to post on the correct diagonal, far as ring direction, or circle
If I am told to take a right lead, riding either an English or western equitation pattern, it is assumed that a lope/canter is implied
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post #34 of 35 Old 11-24-2015, 01:41 PM Thread Starter
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Darn it all. What have I started? Never intended to get folks all "het up".
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post #35 of 35 Old 11-24-2015, 02:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
No, I am not. The trot does not have leads. The human can have diagonals
Show me one English equitation pattern where the word 'lead' is used in any trotting. It is incorrect terminology There is no leading leg, although there is a diagonal pair and you can set a horse up for a correct lead departure at a canter, but for a trot, the rider will first sit, then pick up the correct diagonal, depending on direction
Most people do not have the strength nor does the horse have the training, to start from a two point position, as this pattern calls for
GoHorseShow.com | Breaking Down the Congress Patterns: Hunt Seat Equitation - GoHorseShow.com

At any rate, if you wish to say find your diagonal according to lead stride legs,( inside front, outside hind) that is one thing, but to say a horse has leads at a trot is incorrect Any show I have ever been at, or any clinic I have ever taken, confines the word 'leads to the canter and diagonals for the trot
Never heard anyone that knows their equitation , ever tell someone that they are on the wrong lead at a trot. They are told that they are on the wrong diagonal.
Never in a rail class, have even been knocked down if it takes two strides to get that right diagonal, versus a wrong lead departure at the canter
You are still thinking of the leading leg (as in first leg to strike out into trot) in the same context as the lead in canter. It is NOT the same thing at all
When an animal or a human sets of in any pace (other than jumping off all its feet at the same time!!) then one leg will always strike out, step out or lead before the others.
There are no Equitation classes in the UK like the ones in the US and Canada so I'm afraid I have zero experience of them so cannot comment on the 'patterns' they do in fact the terminology 'pattern' also doesn't exist in UK showing and there is nothing at all in UK showing to compare with the link you posted
You don't have experience of everything in the entire horse world so you cannot say that a terminology doesn't exist simply because you've never heard it said.
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