Terrible horsebox loading experience :'( - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
 83Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 04:16 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 3,493
• Horses: 1
Different methods work for different horses, so it is not surprising different methods were tried. As the new owner and the person paying for the transport it is of course up to you as to what methods are used and maybe you needed a more experienced horse person to help you control the situation. At the end of the day they had to load the horse and will do their best to do so, if you wanted it to be a good experience then more practice should have been put in place first which may have taken weeks.

I load my youngsters every night until they are completely happy with the lorry or trailer, but occasionally they may get a smack if they decided to be stubborn but it has to be with the correct understanding between trainer and horse and not a means of frightening them in. I see no problem with pressure halters (they can work really well), flicking water, smacking with a crop - they all can be useful (but I draw the line at chains in mouth).
Clava is offline  
post #22 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 04:29 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New South Wales, Australia
Posts: 4,863
• Horses: 1
Moving horses can be horrible.

However, you have to be smart about choosing who you use. Transport companies are not horse trainers, you should be getting your horse loading fine and traveling fine before using them. They are professional transporters, good trucks, good driving, but they're not trainers or even horse people sometimes. If your horse isn't at that level then it's often best to either do it yourself, or hire a trainer with transport to come and work with your horse.

One of my horses I put days of work into and still had to sedate a little to get on board. Another took a few hours to go on, in both these situations if I was with a transport company it wouldn't have been feasible.

One thing that is really important to me is, if you're going to try and make the horse get on, they've got to get on. Trying all these harsh techniques, then stopping before the horse gets on... well that's probably made the situation a fair bit worse.

Take a couple of days or weeks to load train him everyday, or get a real professional horse trainer to come in and do it.
Tryst likes this.
Saskia is offline  
post #23 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 06:04 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: North Dakota, USA
Posts: 3,459
• Horses: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlondeRider25 View Post
I didn't write this to get attacked for what I didn't or did do. I obviously didn't explain everything well and am upset still after what happened.

I would have paid any amount to take a while - money was not a problem. I left it in the hands of the professionals! Something I thought was OK. Also it was the responsibility of the seller to train him to load NOT me in this situation
Posted via Mobile Device
I don't know if you will be back on here because of the way you are feeling attacked. This is a good forum and you can learn a lot from it. Don't take this, if it is the first time you're on here, as the way we are always. Some of the comments may seem harsh but they also have truth to them.

Being new to horses, there is a lot to learn. You may have assumed that because the previous owner had loaded the horse a couple times that they were responsible for training the horse to load. Did you have an agreement with them to continue training the horse after you bought it? Unless that happened, once the money/horse exchange hands, it becomes your responsibility.

Even if the horse has loaded well in one trailer, that doesn't mean that it will load in any trailer. I knew of a horse that would load just fine in an open stock trailer but wouldn't go in a straight load.

I hope that you do stick around after this bad experience. Not only with what happened to your horse but what also happened here. I also hope all is well with your horse.
Posted via Mobile Device
usandpets is offline  
post #24 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 06:20 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW UK
Posts: 15,774
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse View Post

From my point of view, the horse has never travelled, but has practised loading a couple of times, well if has practised it well why should you expect an issue? When I sold my colts often they had only been loaded a couple of times, because if they get it, they get it, I'm not making an issue out of a simple thing.
Loading onto a horsebox is different to a trailer. The ramps are often a lot steeper and on some cab. Be quite narrow. Also, many only have some ramps which means a horse has to turn as soon as he gets inside.
Generally horses travel and load better in a horsebox rather than a trailer. The roads in the UK are twisty and many corners with bad cambers (to say nothing of the potholes!)

I will always give a youngster the benefit of the doubt when loading until it is just saying "NO" then it is no nonsense time.
franknbeans, Clava and 2BigReds like this.
Foxhunter is offline  
post #25 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 07:55 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Some times Llanelian - North wales, sometimes Hull in East Yorkshire (UK)
Posts: 3,703
• Horses: 5
I have used all but the gum line to load a horse in the past! I've even used a pressure hose on ones backside when it refused point blank to load.
Lunge lines round its backside also are quite useful!

Sorry but they are proffessional transporters and do not have time to mess around loading a difficult loader, they will also be very worried about other horses they may have onboard (who potentialy have already been on board for several hours), the other customers they have to get horses to/from that day, the safety of all involved and the safety of the lorry

It was your responsibility to check it would load.

Also how on earth did it bang its head on the lorry roof? to do that it would have to already be in the lorry! cant be done from the ramp believe me i've had one try! I've also got dents in the roof of my lorry from one that reared in the lorry and it is horrific to drive a bad traveller.

My young lad came over from Ireland, he had also never been in a lorry before the transporter picked him up, I dont want to know how they got him onboard (he may just have walked up or he may have been difficult), In Ireland they take no crap from thier horses so its likely if he was difficult the methods used were not the most pleasant.
The transporter was well aware the horse had never travelled or loaded before, He was the last pick up of the day on a lorry that only had one other onboard, and I was told I would have to pay extra if he took more than 15mins to load (he didnt).

I have since taken him out 3 times in my lorry, he loads like a dream now and walks straight up the ramp so if they had to force him in then it was better that they won the fight by any means nessecary!
Travelling him is a stressful undertaking as he is not the best traveller but at least he loads!

RIDE your horse FORWARDS and keep him STRAIGHT

faye is offline  
post #26 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 08:38 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: left of center
Posts: 7,141
• Horses: 2
Yup-horses can be trained to one type of "float" and the transporter has another….some horses react to that and will, at the very least-hesitate. I have one who is used to a ramp straight load…will self load on it. But a step up slant load-not the same thing. It also depends on the light in the transport, etc. As far as the methods-not a big deal, and no, the transporters are NOT there to train the horse. Time is $$.

Signature undergoing edits. Please standby.......
franknbeans is offline  
post #27 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 09:02 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 3,493
• Horses: 1
Just as an aside to this, I bought a pony and arranged a transporter to collect him and we ended up literally almost carrying him on board (he was quite small) but I didn't get any help from the transport driver who turned up as he only had one arm.
2BigReds likes this.
Clava is offline  
post #28 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 10:25 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Some times Llanelian - North wales, sometimes Hull in East Yorkshire (UK)
Posts: 3,703
• Horses: 5
I bought A pony and spent 3hrs loading him, we had our own transport thankfully but believe me a lot of things were tried to get him in!
Little PITA was a somewhat unreliable loader but was just being stubborn
Posted via Mobile Device
faye is offline  
post #29 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 10:54 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 15,433
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
Loading onto a horsebox is different to a trailer. The ramps are often a lot steeper and on some cab. Be quite narrow. Also, many only have some ramps which means a horse has to turn as soon as he gets inside.
Generally horses travel and load better in a horsebox rather than a trailer. The roads in the UK are twisty and many corners with bad cambers (to say nothing of the potholes!)

I will always give a youngster the benefit of the doubt when loading until it is just saying "NO" then it is no nonsense time.
There should be little difference in my mind, it is not about the loading, it is about the horse following you. Why does the UK ramp make any difference? Gibbs has never loaded on a ramp, until we went to the show, and he loaded like a champ, unloading was hilarious, backing down with teeny tiny steps.

My filly, Angel, had a couple of loading sessions before I had my jack knife incident with her in the trailer, that should have been enough to sour any baby, but she jumped right in behind me when my friend and I turned up with her strange trailer.

Again my issue here is all the assumptions being made of what was and wasn't said to the shipping company, and the horrible way that people have reacted to a new user, posting in the new to horses section. I must also be in a minority of one, because I have ALWAYS taken the responsibility of loading horses who leave here, and have always left it to the old owner to load a horse when buying. If this had been a horse in her possession for a long time then yes haul her over the coals for the fact he doesn't load, but she was just buying him.

Oh and believe me FH, while the UK has the prize for twisty roads and cambers, your pot holes are BABIES compared to Saskatchewan

“Never attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidity”
Golden Horse is offline  
post #30 of 61 Old 06-17-2014, 11:03 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Some times Llanelian - North wales, sometimes Hull in East Yorkshire (UK)
Posts: 3,703
• Horses: 5
GH do ur pot holes destroy the suspension on 4x4s then? Some of the ones round here do!
Last week a friend of mine shrewd a wheel but off his jcb due to a pot holey road
Posted via Mobile Device
faye is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Terrible horsebox loading experience! :( BlondeRider25 Horse Trailers 5 06-16-2014 10:33 AM
Horsebox Insurance louise12 Horse Talk 5 09-26-2013 11:18 AM
Parking my horsebox DeeDee1 Horse Riding & Horse Activity 1 02-26-2013 08:11 AM
The advantages of owning a horsebox stevec71 Horse Articles 0 05-04-2012 08:12 AM
My trailer loading experience today churumbeque Horse Training 13 03-18-2012 06:44 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome