Terrifying moment - Page 7 - The Horse Forum
 276Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #61 of 80 Old 08-13-2016, 10:57 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 25,450
• Horses: 7
dummy...

(Just kidding). After having horses at my house for a gazillion years... I can't tell you how many times mine have escaped and for many reasons... left the stall door open, forgot to shut the gate, fence went down, turned them loose in the yard expecting them to behave... gone through the fence when it wasn't hot... etc.

I remember even being on a first name basis with the game warden at one time!

Glad they are all ok!
Change and Acadianartist like this.

"Be a best friend, tell the truth, and overuse I love you
Go to work, do your best, don't outsmart your common sense
Never let your prayin knees get lazy
And love like crazy"
farmpony84 is offline  
post #62 of 80 Old 08-14-2016, 04:08 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW UK
Posts: 15,186
• Horses: 0
I couldn't understand why several of the horses were escaping from their stables. All shut in for the night and in the morning they would all be loose, in the arena and about the place.

I thought it was someone coming down and letting them out. All doors had a bolt at the top and a kick bolt at the bottom.

It became more and more frequent so, I left for the night around 6 p.m. Drove off and then trekked back across several fields to catch whoever was doing it.

I hadn't been there long, hidden in a hedge watching when Stanley, a three year old pony, jumped over his 4' door and proceeded to undo every top and bottom bolt of the other horses! Stopped his antics by using an anti weaving grill on his stable door.
Foxhunter is offline  
post #63 of 80 Old 08-14-2016, 02:42 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,142
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
I couldn't understand why several of the horses were escaping from their stables. All shut in for the night and in the morning they would all be loose, in the arena and about the place.

I thought it was someone coming down and letting them out. All doors had a bolt at the top and a kick bolt at the bottom.

It became more and more frequent so, I left for the night around 6 p.m. Drove off and then trekked back across several fields to catch whoever was doing it.

I hadn't been there long, hidden in a hedge watching when Stanley, a three year old pony, jumped over his 4' door and proceeded to undo every top and bottom bolt of the other horses! Stopped his antics by using an anti weaving grill on his stable door.
That's the most amazing story yet! Smart pony!
Change likes this.
Acadianartist is offline  
post #64 of 80 Old 08-14-2016, 05:00 PM
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Olds Alberta Canada
Posts: 12,041
• Horses: 0
I always use portable electric fencing within the perimeter of permanent fencelines, even though my horses are very respectful of anything that looks like an electric tape
I do make an exception, at times, when I am home, and want to graze the back of the barn area, which is not fenced, but I only will put horses in it, that I know will respect that tape, and never when I am gone, or over night

In fact, I run the charge tot hat electric tape off of my permanent fence, which all have a top hot wire
My gates are commercial steel gates , that come with that chain, to which I add a good snap, just in case a horse learns to play with that chain. I used to have home made wooden type gates in places, but they failed at times, and horses seem to like to challenge them, chew them, ect, while they leave steel gates alone. At least mine do!
Smilie is offline  
post #65 of 80 Old 08-15-2016, 02:44 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 4,351
• Horses: 3
My tenant is moving out next weekend, so I'm already planning for a double gate at the end of that driveway, plus moving electric fencing out to the treeline (other side of the drive). I'm also going to run electric fencing around the backyard area to provide more grazing space - although that'll be limited to daytime only and when we're home.

I'm going to be putting the mobile home up for sale on FB and Craigslist - $2000 and you haul it off - so I can use that area for a barn. I'd really like to have better shelter for the horses and a place for a full winter's worth of hay! Not to mention getting all that stuff out of our garage! If no takers on the mobile by the end of September, I'm going to see if the Fire Department wants to practice burning a house down!

The e-fences are (hopefully) only temporary until I can afford to put up wood fences. The horses respect the electric, but I always feel safer with something solid!
JCnGrace, sarahfromsc and weedlady like this.

Courage is taking just one more step...
Change is offline  
post #66 of 80 Old 08-18-2016, 12:27 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Rural Hall, NC
Posts: 188
• Horses: 2
The morning after I read your post (seriously, how did I not learn?), I went to feed my horses at 6am only to find the gate wide open and no horses! I grabbed Nova's halter, he's my dominant, and a cup of grain, calling for them with no clue what direction they'd gone. I jumped in my car, with the headlamp I feed in the dark with still on my head, and took off to look for them, hollering for them the whole way. Thankfully, they were just up the road, munching grass in the field we ride in. I leapt out of the car, shaking the grain and trying to hide the halter behind my back. Nova started going away, but came straight to me when he heard the grain and there was no trouble hooking him up. Went and turned off the car and trotted him home as I needed to be at work in an hour. Soldier plodded along behind us and neither were interested in their hay after fattening up on all that grass!


Talking with neighbors the next day and following their poop trail, I don't think they were out for more than an hour or so, but still--check those gate latches!


I do not, and will not keep halters on them if they are out in their paddock. Even though I have break-aways, I don't trust them not to do something stupid, as horses will do, and cause major damage.
evilgreen1 is offline  
post #67 of 80 Old 08-19-2016, 07:28 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW UK
Posts: 15,186
• Horses: 0
About a month after we had moved I had abut ten horses all together in one field and three colts in another.

Nothing was finished in the stabling or barns (or come to that, my cottage!) it was chaotic to say the least.

The hunt came through and all of the ten older horses followed the riders out over the hunt jump into the neighbouring farmer's field. One order came up to the stables whilst others herded them back into theor field. Later the hunt came back through the field where the colts were amd they too decided to follow and jump out. Not so easy to get them back as there was no gate! The three, all yearlings, were caught and led back with seasoned riders leading them from their horses with only their hunting whips around their necks. This meant going across a couple of fields and about a mile on the road.

I was complimented on having good jumping horses and how well mannered they were!
dlady, Yogiwick, Woodhaven and 3 others like this.
Foxhunter is offline  
post #68 of 80 Old 08-19-2016, 11:43 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Rural Hall, NC
Posts: 188
• Horses: 2
Starting to think I should hand out halters and leads to my neighbors...
Yogiwick and Change like this.
evilgreen1 is offline  
post #69 of 80 Old 08-19-2016, 12:14 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW UK
Posts: 15,186
• Horses: 0
The horses and ponies at my forst riding school were all turned out on downland. Sunday was their day off.

On a Sunday afternoon several of us children would go up amd bring some to the stables fields ready for work on Monday. We went up to Far Down to bring in several of the bigger weight carrying horses. We would hang off the back platform of the bus to see where they were. If we couldn't see them then they could only be in two places.

We couldn't see them. We went to one area and they weren't there so we walked to the very far end, no sign of them but the gate was open.

As this was a Bridlepath the gate couldn't be locked and being summer a lot of people walked and often the gate was left open despite notices asking for it to be closed.
We trudged our way onto the open downland which was nothing but gorse (furze) bracken and heather. We split up and went along various rabbit tracks,, trying to find them hidden by the gorse. Not a sign of them. We even went through to more open land though the two gates leading to it were closed.
After about four hours of searching we gave up and walked back to the stables.

Those five horses had vanished, disappeared, been abducted by aliens, not a sign of them.

Monday was very difficult as we needed those horses for tourists, but having spent even longer looking for them and liveries going out on their ponies searching there wasn't a sign.

After four days if was pointless looking on foot so, after the rides of the day were finished, we were sent out to search. Three of us went out and rode through three lots of gates onto Big Down, we really didn't expect to find them because of the gates amd others had ridden that way.

At the far side of the hill there was an old stone barn which was packed with hay. It was the horses we were riding that showed interest in the barn, ears *****ed looking at it. As we drew level I could see the back of a horse through the open window in the back wall.

Those five horses had found that the barn was not as packed with hay as we thought, there was a way through to the back where an area had been left for calves. What more could they look for, a dark barn with a deep if dirty straw to lay down on,neater and bones hay to eat and then out to graze on good long grass all night?

Certainly better than having to work!

Ignorance of people out walking and leaving gates open was and is a big problem with rights of way across farm land in the UK.
dlady, Yogiwick, Change and 1 others like this.
Foxhunter is offline  
post #70 of 80 Old 08-19-2016, 08:34 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: New England
Posts: 12,001
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
About a month after we had moved I had abut ten horses all together in one field and three colts in another.

Nothing was finished in the stabling or barns (or come to that, my cottage!) it was chaotic to say the least.

The hunt came through and all of the ten older horses followed the riders out over the hunt jump into the neighbouring farmer's field. One order came up to the stables whilst others herded them back into theor field. Later the hunt came back through the field where the colts were amd they too decided to follow and jump out. Not so easy to get them back as there was no gate! The three, all yearlings, were caught and led back with seasoned riders leading them from their horses with only their hunting whips around their necks. This meant going across a couple of fields and about a mile on the road.

I was complimented on having good jumping horses and how well mannered they were!
LOVE IT! You know you're a horse person when your response to a horse getting loose and running after you is "What a NICE horse!!" and then you turn around and bring the horse back.
Change likes this.
Yogiwick is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The terrifying plastic bag peppersonlygirl Horse Training 25 03-24-2015 03:43 PM
One Terrifying Drive. KsKatt Horse Talk 24 10-03-2014 08:44 PM
I hate kangaroos! Who's got terrifying wildlife? Prinella Horse Talk 31 12-18-2013 10:02 AM
Terrifying experience furbabymum Horse Talk 5 03-27-2012 12:08 PM
Terrifying.... Nita General Off Topic Discussion 10 06-13-2010 08:44 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome