Is There Any Such Thing As A Safe Horse? - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 12:58 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Rideabighorse View Post
In a way you can look at a horse like a car. Some are easier to control than others,some are more reliable than others, and some are safer than others. The problem is that any of them can kill you if things go very wrong. The problem with horses is that what you see is often not what you get. A horse that seems like a sweetheart can have emotional problems and blow up with too much pushing. Just take your time and look at a lot of horses. There are some that are really nice.
Wow. How would you ever know that a horse which seems like a sweetheart is going to blow up? I mean, are there signs? I've found that some people dismiss pushy behavior for 'affection', but I've never heard of a genuinely calm horse that went batty... what would you do to determine if a horse is genuinely calm or just waiting to have an episode?
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post #32 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 01:14 AM
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I'm pretty sure what Rideabighorse is describing is pushing in the sense of asking a horse to do something they feel is hard or not worth doing. Not pushy behavior. Forgive me for putting words in your mouth if this is incorrect, Rideabighorse.

Some horses when asked to go into puddles, go past something scary, get up next to a gate so you can open/close it, or generally are asked to do something a little (or sometimes a lot) out of their comfort zone can get wild and blow up (throw a temper tantrum/go nuts).

I think the best way to avoid getting a horse like this is to make sure it is pushed outside of its 'normal zone' when you to see it. Ex., have them leave the property/go on a short trail ride, leave his/her buddies, basically do almost everything under the sun if you can get the owner to agree.

It might be good to have a checklist to go through like this one: http://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/...checklist.html

Last edited by littlebird; 06-13-2014 at 01:20 AM.
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post #33 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 01:30 AM
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You can usually tell when outbursts based on being pushed out of the comfort zone are coming on (the horse may refuse to go forward, pinned ears, wringing tail, etc. prior to an outburst). However, there are exceptions where a horse may blow up suddenly with no prior warning, such as rare cases of aneurysms/neurological issues or pain response.
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post #34 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 01:55 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by littlebird View Post

I think the best way to avoid getting a horse like this is to make sure it is pushed outside of its 'normal zone' when you to see it. Ex., have them leave the property/go on a short trail ride, leave his/her buddies, basically do almost everything under the sun if you can get the owner to agree.
That's a really good idea, and one I hadn't thought of before, thanks! This whole 'buying a horse' thing is more complicated than it seems.
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post #35 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 03:22 AM
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Horse riding is a risk sport. There is always an element of danger and even if you have the 'perfect' horse it can trip or fall and end up on top of you!

Temperament and handling pay a great part in how well a horse behaves. They are not stupid and horse that has been tried and tested and be exactly what you are looking for, can, within hours or days become something very different because the new owner is not setting rules and boundaries.

On the other hand some sellers will state things that are not true, blatantly trying to sell something that is not as stated!
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post #36 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 04:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by littlebird View Post
I think the best way to avoid getting a horse like this is to make sure it is pushed outside of its 'normal zone' when you to see it. Ex., have them leave the property/go on a short trail ride, leave his/her buddies, basically do almost everything under the sun if you can get the owner to agree.
I agree. I always tell people to try a horse in the ring, out on the trail, alone, and with a group. As you say, any situation that you may ride in.

On the sixth day, God created the Quarter Horse.
On the seventh day, he Painted the good ones.
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post #37 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 07:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FerrumEquus View Post
Wow. How would you ever know that a horse which seems like a sweetheart is going to blow up? I mean, are there signs? I've found that some people dismiss pushy behavior for 'affection', but I've never heard of a genuinely calm horse that went batty... what would you do to determine if a horse is genuinely calm or just waiting to have an episode?

Let's say that now I decide to sell my horse (I'm really describing my personal horse). I know him and what irks him, so if you want to come on sunday, I'll make sure he is been worked every day for 4-5 days prior to that (and if needed, a couple of hours that same day)

Then you come and see him. He's super-easy to catch at the paddok. Put on the bridle? 5 seconds. I currently ride him bitless, but I can assure you that he's used to the bit (ehy, I have pics of that in avatar).
He's super sweet, like a big puppy. Adores to be groomed. Yeah I'm bribing him with carrots when I pick up his legs, but you're probably all over how cute he is. He doesn't act pushy.
I'll let you ride, in the round pen, because the ground outside is really rocky and dangerous, and you know… but I assure you, he likes the outside world.
Horsie stands still when you mount. Trots a bit, has to be prayed for some gallop, stops immediately… sounds like a good calm beginners horse, or even kids horse. I might add that I have other potential buyers waiting, so if you please can tell me if you are interested before I sell him to them…

Soo now you have bought horsie, and he turns into Evil Spirit From Hell. If you are unfortunate enough to put him in a box for a couple of days, you'll have a bomb coming out of it. Same thing if you want light ride for 1-2 time a week, you'll better start to lunge him for a loooong time so he bucks off his energy before you're on. And if you lunge him in an big space, wear gloves. If you lunge him in a open space? Don't even bother with gloves, he'll break the lunge and run without bothering about you. And if you re new at lunging, or if you tried with horses that were trained in different ways, you might discover that after the first 10 minutes of wild run, you can't make him gallop again.
Let's talk about tack, if you weren't paying attention when I put on the bridle? You might not be able to do it at all. Want to put on the bit? I really hope you have someone helping you. Overbribe with carrots? Horsie will literally step on you to reach them, or to look for them if they are finished. Forget his front legs if you're a beginner (maybe your instructor will be able to pick them up).
Want to go on trail? I hope it's on the beach, you know, soft landing. Good luck finding the horse again, since he could have rune miles away by the time you get up.
And you better not lose patience and act rough or try to force him into anything, or you'll find that Evil Spirit has no issues walking on 2 legs, and will do it sooner if you are in front of him.

Yeah all his issues can be addressed, and a knowledgeable horse-person (even better one who knows how to deal with arabians) would figure out what's wrong and how to fix it in a short time, or even not have most of the problems arise at all. A beginner who wants an "easy" horse could get seriously hurt.

I hope I didn't scare you too much^ I just wanted to write an example of how a seller in bad faith can hide a horse's defects if he really wants to sell and has no regards for the buyer's safety.


If you can find someone who allows it, have a contract saying that the horse will be "on trial" with you for at least two weeks, more is better, so you can have time to discover at least the most evident "little things" that you'll never notice the first time you see the horse.
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post #38 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 10:32 AM
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I know him and what irks him, so if you want to come on sunday, I'll make sure he is been worked every day for 4-5 days prior to that (and if needed, a couple of hours that same day)
Things like this happen all the time. That's why, as a buyer, you ask how often the horse is ridden, if they were ridden that day, etc. Look for sweat marks on the horse. Be realistic with the seller about your abilities.

Yes there are crooked sellers. There are also buyers that wont listen to the truth. I once sold a gorgeous gelding to the nicest, experienced lady. I explained that he needed regular work, and lots of it, to be his best. He could be opinionated, very zippy and buck if not ridden regularly. She fell in love with his look and insisted he would be perfect. I spent half an hour on the phone telling her all his faults, and that I had reservations about selling the horse to her. She insisted. I found out later that another family member took the horse over because it was too much for the buyer.

Quote:
How would you ever know that a horse which seems like a sweetheart is going to blow up?
normally you can see if a horse is the willing type, listening to your cues and trying to figure them out. If you ask for something minor they are not familiar with and the response is for them to pin their ears and tense up, you might have a problem when you ask for something bigger. Unfortunately for most riders, being able to read a horse well enough to tell the difference between try, frustration, resignation, anger and the beginning signs of a blow up is something that only many miles in the saddle, on many horses can teach you.

I wish there was some magical formula that you could apply and find the perfect horse, but the truth is, a relationship with a horse has many similarities to any other sort of partnership. You don't meet someone, fall in love immediately and BOOM, happily ever after. Its hard work, and a big learning curve for most people. Any close friendship is the same. You make mistakes, they make mistakes, you work on fixing what is wrong and in the end you have a happy friendship.
And just like those relationships, sometimes, no matter how promising the start, it doesn't work.
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post #39 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by FerrumEquus View Post
That's a really good idea, and one I hadn't thought of before, thanks! This whole 'buying a horse' thing is more complicated than it seems.
Yes, yes it is Ahaha. When I bought my paint last Sunday, I made sure to work him on the ground,test him a bit, see what he knew,did a full body check over first time I met him, and had my dad AND sister do the same the next met and greet, I rode him the first time I met him( and second, then I took him home), i tied him, saddled him up myself, and bridled him as well,I actually had an easier time bridling him then his previous owner ( it was kinda funny because she wasn't used to a stubborn horse lol) I took him around the pasture at a walk then a trot, it was a to small of an area to canter, so im yet to see how he is in that aspect ( I'm curious how he'll do)

If you can, get someone who knows what to look for in a horse, I really wouldn't want you to get the wrong horse for you, best of luck :)
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post #40 of 79 Old 06-13-2014, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cielo Notturno View Post

If you can find someone who allows it, have a contract saying that the horse will be "on trial" with you for at least two weeks, more is better, so you can have time to discover at least the most evident "little things" that you'll never notice the first time you see the horse.
I would NEVER do a trial if I was a seller UNLESS it was on-site and they paid for the board during the trial. Whenever I have sold a horse, I've told the prospective buyer to come as many times as they want, spend time with the horse and so on. But would never ever do a trial off farm.....far too much can happen.
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