Is There Any Such Thing As A Safe Horse? - Page 8 - The Horse Forum
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post #71 of 79 Old 06-24-2014, 04:25 AM
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I spent some time as a horse guide and took people out on trails in the Rocky Mountains. I would have to say, all guide horses we used were 100% safe. I had a small tree fall on one of the ponies, ridden by a child who had no riding experience, during a windstorm. The pony did not move until I dismounted and move the tree off the pony.

Horses can be safe, it depends on the training!
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post #72 of 79 Old 06-24-2014, 08:15 AM
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I know rescues tend to be hit or miss but one thing I will say is that I've had good experiences with them in that they are totally honest about their horses in terms of health and behavioral issues. Reputable places will say "hard to catch in the field" or "needs to be twitched for the farrier" or "bucks" etc. Perhaps if OP can find a good rescue without one of those silly contracts they might be better off.

Buying a horse can be scary. I've gotten burned before and was a year long nightmare from start to finish. That was 4-5 years ago, and I'm only just now buying a horse again, and I still have trepidations about it. I even get nightmares and panic attacks over it. Definitely trust your gut, and don't let your heart make the decision when your head is disagreeing.
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Last edited by sea; 06-24-2014 at 08:21 AM.
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post #73 of 79 Old 06-29-2014, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by sea View Post
I know rescues tend to be hit or miss but one thing I will say is that I've had good experiences with them in that they are totally honest about their horses in terms of health and behavioral issues. Reputable places will say "hard to catch in the field" or "needs to be twitched for the farrier" or "bucks" etc. Perhaps if OP can find a good rescue without one of those silly contracts they might be better off.
I can say a few things on regard to the 2 rescues I have experience with. Both were honest but 1 was bad at making matches so horses were always returned. Where I adopted from was the one who in 2 years only had 1 bad match. I volunteered there as some of you may remember. I never signed the adoption agreement just the boarding agreement. I was pregnant and going to lease my mare and they said per the contract I couldn't. They also tried to take her out from under me when I was pregnant because I didn't "visit" her enough. Needless to say I moved her and its no longer an issue. DON'T sign the ridiculous contracts is the moral of the story. Thankfully I didnt sign and got an amazing mare still
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post #74 of 79 Old 06-30-2014, 03:05 AM
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I never trust a horse 100% simply because of the fact that horses are animals of prey. They will ALWAYS resort to inate instinct if it realy boils down to it. How well they are trained plays a HUGE role on a horses behavior and turstability. My late mare who I trusted 98 % of the time was a well behaved animal but a couple times she would have resorted back to instinctal behavior if I wasnt there to guide her. She was a steady mount and I trusted her with children as long as I was there and with them. After all she was a big horse and could be intimidating to the little ones due to her size. She was always very well behaved around children and rather gentle with them but she was still a horse. She was used as a trail horse for ppl to rent and ride at one time.

The level and completeness of training plays a huge role in building a great horse with alot of exposure to external stimuli. Many ppl forget the foundation training and then boo hoo that thier horse is unsafe or lacks good behavior. Of course if a good tempered horse is used consistantly through out the years they eventualy get used to thier surroundings and other stimuli thus making them more level headed in thier older ages. (However this is not always the case with some horses it depends on various other things as well.)

Sounds like you have just ran into a few that were not as they were described. You will run into that more often than not. That is why its best to be selective and pateint when looking for a good mount. You may want to take a experienced person with you to help you out on your selection. I knew a guy who stated that everything he had was "kid broke". I think he meant the horses will break your kids. Most of what he had I wouldnt ride myself let alone a child. With this guy....Buyer beware indeed.

Some horses are just full, high spirited and some are just natrualy high strung.........but and this is a big but.....they should still and can be well trained. I rode a Go go get em horse who was well into his teens that was not for children but WOW what a ride he was. He was great to ride, full of spirit and full of energy and would go any where and jump anything for you. Was honest and never offered to rear, buck or bolt but was just full of go. He was well trained, would stand still for you to mount and would stand still if you asked him, he would listen to your cues and perform with out much ado but he was just very forward and strong. I personaly loved him. He was a lesson horse for the higher level riders at the school I attended. On the ground he was great as well. So one can be high spirited and or fulll of vim and vigor but that does not mean they cannot be well trained and reined to use that energy for the better. High spirited does not and should not mean untrainable. I have ridden high strung Saddlebreds that where full of energy but well behaved and well trained under saddle. Its all about the trainer and some about the horse. Some horses just put up will the nutty things thier riders do regardless of thier level of training.......those make for even better horses to ride and trust with.

"The question is not, can they reason? nor, can they talk? but, can they suffer?" Jeremy Bentham
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post #75 of 79 Old 07-02-2014, 06:57 AM
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So is there such a thing as a safe horse? Or does every seasoned rider eventually end up with a broken neck / back? (Seems like every rider I know has had at least one serious spinal injury at some point - and that doesn't sound like any fun to me.)



Funny thing, as this topic just came up at a show committee meeting I was just at. While horses are very large animals and 1000 plus lbs of livestock can kill you, I remember the day when riding was no more dangerous then any other sport. With that said, I do see a flood of poor quality horses, trainers, and scary riders. Accidents happen, but many times they can be avoided. A bee sting can certainly take the most seasoned packer and turn them into a bucking bronc , but when riders are unloaded or otherwise injured by either lack of knowledge or mounted on subpar stock well that is a different story.
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post #76 of 79 Old 07-03-2014, 09:59 AM
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No they aren't 100% safe. Can you find one that is trustworthy and the chances of something untoward happening are lower? Yes. The safety level of interactions with a horse depend on three things the animal's training, your experience and the environment you are in.
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post #77 of 79 Old 07-04-2014, 03:47 PM
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This pony was as safe as you could get for a child!
My nephew, about 5 years when this was taken, rarely wanted to ride, when he did he was always into doing things he shouldn't.

I found him in the arena happily cantering around without having done up his girth at all, it was flapping around her legs! When I asked his older sister why she hadn't told him to do the girth up she told me that when she went to help he was nasty to her and wanted to do it himself, so she let him.
He use to climb onto the rail and step on to mount because he couldn't reach the stirrup.
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post #78 of 79 Old 07-04-2014, 09:12 PM
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Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
No they aren't 100% safe. Can you find one that is trustworthy and the chances of something untoward happening are lower? Yes. The safety level of interactions with a horse depend on three things the animal's training, your experience and the environment you are in.
And add a 4th: mindset of the horse
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post #79 of 79 Old 07-05-2014, 02:44 PM
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Yep, the 4th needs to be included....I'd say it applies to both horse and rider.
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