Thoughs on this horse? - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 46 Old 12-06-2015, 05:29 PM
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The term "rescue" indicates a horse that has been abused or neglected. That's different from a pasture pet (a horse that's generally well taken care of, but not ridden). Getting a rescue means you have a horse that has had bad experiences and may react in unpredictable ways at things most horses wouldn't flinch about. Even with the help of a trainer, in general terms, a rescue is not a good choice for a beginner. I am of the same mind as Corporal. Get a mature been-there-done-that horse that is totally safe. Maybe a semi-retired show horse, or a horse that can no longer perform at high levels (such as barrel racers or jumpers) but can still do basic Western pleasure. Just because it doesn't look like they go fast in the Western pleasure videos you've seen doesn't mean you don't need a safe, reliable horse, well-trained horse.
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post #42 of 46 Old 12-06-2015, 05:47 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
The term "rescue" indicates a horse that has been abused or neglected. That's different from a pasture pet (a horse that's generally well taken care of, but not ridden). Getting a rescue means you have a horse that has had bad experiences and may react in unpredictable ways at things most horses wouldn't flinch about. Even with the help of a trainer, in general terms, a rescue is not a good choice for a beginner. I am of the same mind as Corporal. Get a mature been-there-done-that horse that is totally safe. Maybe a semi-retired show horse, or a horse that can no longer perform at high levels (such as barrel racers or jumpers) but can still do basic Western pleasure. Just because it doesn't look like they go fast in the Western pleasure videos you've seen doesn't mean you don't need a safe, reliable horse, well-trained horse.
I will do
I'll see what my trainer/coach can find
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post #43 of 46 Old 12-07-2015, 11:02 AM
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Location: East Central Illinois
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Drive ONLY two hours to look at a suitable horse!
My DH's atty associate has a somewhat horse crazy daughter, and they wistfully considering buying her a horse. I would travel 12-14 hours one way, if I thought it took that to purchase a safe mount.
You have to consider that horses can injure you, and many injuries won't heal right, no matter WHAT kind of health insurance you have.
Don't want to scare you, but you SHOULD have your trainer look for a very safe babysitter that is happy to stand still for a good hour after you get on. That is what my best babysitter horses did, and they gave my riding students great confidence. They ARE out there. Some aren't as pretty as the TB that you were looking at. If you are really athletic, you might buy one and move up in a year or so. OR you might be happily riding this same horse one decade from now.
A well trained and safe horse is worth his weight in gold, and never truly appreciated by a new horseman, until you've had the falls and bucks and scares that the rest of us have.
Just FYI.

A Jack and Three Queens, the latest book by James C. Dedman, Amazon.com
Hope that you fall in love with "Trot", like I did! https://www.horseforum.com/general-of...queens-617793/
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post #44 of 46 Old 12-07-2015, 11:26 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal View Post
Drive ONLY two hours to look at a suitable horse!
My DH's atty associate has a somewhat horse crazy daughter, and they wistfully considering buying her a horse. I would travel 12-14 hours one way, if I thought it took that to purchase a safe mount.
You have to consider that horses can injure you, and many injuries won't heal right, no matter WHAT kind of health insurance you have.
Don't want to scare you, but you SHOULD have your trainer look for a very safe babysitter that is happy to stand still for a good hour after you get on. That is what my best babysitter horses did, and they gave my riding students great confidence. They ARE out there. Some aren't as pretty as the TB that you were looking at. If you are really athletic, you might buy one and move up in a year or so. OR you might be happily riding this same horse one decade from now.
A well trained and safe horse is worth his weight in gold, and never truly appreciated by a new horseman, until you've had the falls and bucks and scares that the rest of us have.
Just FYI.
I'm not looking for a certain breed really.
I'm not sure if I truly need a babysitter horse...I'm not super new beginner.
I'd say I'm a confident beginner. I have gain my confidence since I have began because of the stubborn Arab mare I ride right now as I only really need to gain my confidence in the jog. So now I can go on another horse(I have) that's a lot bouncier and not be to worry about falling off like I used to. I also have done a lot of practice with steering/reining(mostly because I had to since the Arab likes to do to the gate a lot when she sees it.)
I've had been bucked(not bucked off) and it was okay. I didn't really catch it as I was loping and figuring out what everything that does with that.
I've had spooks(not bad ones) which I took as tripping because the Arab trips sometimes quite a bit depending on the ground.
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post #45 of 46 Old 12-08-2015, 08:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animallover101 View Post
I have gain my confidence since I have began because of the stubborn Arab mare I ride right now as I only really need to gain my confidence in the jog. So now I can go on another horse(I have) that's a lot bouncier and not be to worry about falling off like I used to. I also have done a lot of practice with steering/reining(mostly because I had to since the Arab likes to do to the gate a lot when she sees it.)
I've had been bucked(not bucked off) and it was okay. I didn't really catch it as I was loping and figuring out what everything that does with that.
I've had spooks(not bad ones) which I took as tripping because the Arab trips sometimes quite a bit depending on the ground.
"Corporal" (1982-2009, RIP) was an Arabian. The only stubborn that I ever experienced with him was that he would never give up, even when he had a stroke hours before he passed away. If you think that a horse is stubborn and a problem, you don't know how to train. Hence, you are a beginner and you NEED a good, solid seasoned horse. There is NO SHAME in this. Should I ever rent a horse to ride, I don't want anything fractious. I want a babysitter so that I can enjoy the ride. The babysitter horse would probably appreciate having a rider that isn't kicking and sawing on the reins, too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by animallover101 View Post
I've had been bucked(not bucked off) and it was okay. I didn't really catch it as I was loping and figuring out what everything that does with that.
I've had spooks(not bad ones) which I took as tripping because the Arab trips sometimes quite a bit depending on the ground.
\
You really have no seat right now and need a horse with a nice, smooth trot to teach you how to balance.
The last time I took a "fall" was when I was 12 and on a dude ranch in Loveland, CO., and when I was learning to jump, and went off on the side, holding the horse's neck.
If you choose to argue that you want anything but a horse that can teach you, then...do as you wish and good luck.
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A Jack and Three Queens, the latest book by James C. Dedman, Amazon.com
Hope that you fall in love with "Trot", like I did! https://www.horseforum.com/general-of...queens-617793/
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post #46 of 46 Old 12-08-2015, 08:26 AM
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I think what Corporal is expressing is what a lot of us are thinking. You don't think you are a beginner, but you really, really are. It takes years of riding to get past the beginner stage, not months. My daughter has been riding for almost 5 years and is just now considered a novice (she's jumping and has mastered all the gaits). You say you need more confidence in the jog, but if you're not a beginner, jogging would be just as easy as walking to you - you wouldn't even think twice about it.

We also have an Arab. I learned to ride on an Arab when I was 11. Neither was ever stubborn, just very intelligent. If the horse isn't doing what you want, then chances are, you aren't doing a good job communicating with it. Arabs are incredibly intelligent, sensitive horses.

You may not like the term "babysitter horse". Think of it more like an experienced horse that you can learn on and make mistakes on. Because you will make mistakes. A lot of them. And making a mistake on a green horse can lead to disaster. Whereas making a mistake on a well-trained, experienced horse can be forgiven. They are patient that way.

We aren't trying to diminish your skills as a rider or horse person, just trying to prevent you from getting into a situation that will be bad. You seem to be assuming a lot of things (that your trainer will board your horse, that her students will train it) which are red flags for us.

When I was 12 I got my first horse. I'd had ponies since the age of 5, but they were all boarded. My first horse was a Quarter horse who was a good horse in a lot of ways, but had been in an abuse situation in his previous life. My parents were not horse people and although my coach came with us to look at him, in retrospect, he was not at all the horse that I needed. He had a lot of strange fears. He was afraid of water, anything that made a hissing noise (even fly spray, so I had to sponge him with it instead), the hose, puddles even. He was terrified of cars, which led to many dangerous situations when I could have been seriously hurt (the only thing that saved me was that I could really stay on a horse back then). He did not like trails because at every corner, something spooked him (deer sent him reeling back towards the barn at full gallop once, like they were lions or something). In short, my idea of having a horse of my own in my backyard that I could love and dote on and spend countless hours riding on trails with was severely dampened. I do have great memories of him, but I remember that time with him as pretty stressful. It took me 20 years to have horses again.

We are just trying to save you from the unpleasantness that can come with a horse that is unpredictable and potentially dangerous. A calm, quiet horse you can keep working with as you progress as a rider (and trust me, it takes many, many years) is what you should get. Pay a little more now and save yourself some money and heartache later is my advice.

But as Corporal says, if you choose to get a rescued horse or a green horse, then that is your decision.
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