Tips for finding a good lesson instructor? - The Horse Forum
 10Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 14 Old 01-11-2015, 06:15 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: NWA
Posts: 7
• Horses: 0
Tips for finding a good lesson instructor?

Hello everyone! This is my second post here on the forum. My name is Laura and my husband and I are very interested and excited to get in to the horse world! My family had horses when I was young, but at the time I was so small that I never did get to interact or learn as much as I wanted with horses. Now that I'm older, I am more than ready to start learning, and now I have the means to.

My husband and I are thinking about finding a good stable and taking some lessons to get a basic understanding of horse care, riding and general horsemanship. We would love to own our own horses one day, but we need to gain some more experience and understanding first. I figure this is a great place to start.

Does anyone have any tips/advice for finding a good instructor? A barn will usually have their own horses and tack for lessons, right? Will they teach us all about tack, grooming, feeding, etc? We're going to call a couple of places tomorrow, I just don't want to sound totally ignorant when asking questions. ? The barn we choose will also board our future horses (unless of course we find a different/better barn for boarding) , so what should we look for there? Any advice for a couple of newbies is greatly appreciated. ?
ztensra is offline  
post #2 of 14 Old 01-11-2015, 10:08 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central Hill Country Texas
Posts: 5,551
• Horses: 5
How exciting!

Before you start asking potential instructors questions, I would start asking yourselves some.

What are your goals for riding? Do you just want to learn to ride so that you can enjoy it, potentially do a little show here or there, do some overnight trail adventures together, run barrels on weekends for some extra cash and fun or do you want to do things like dressage, hunter jumper etc.?

Depending upon your answers above, you will find that either Western or English riding fits you best to start with. Also, it will help determine what kind of atmosphere you want in your lessons and your barn.

Some places are really intense, lots of rules, many very competitive, but, often accomplished, horse people. Others are more casual and relaxed with knowlegable but less intensity, with a kind of “family” feel and many somewhere in between.

Some people do well when pushed to their physical and mental limits by an instructor, other people find that kind of instruction destroys their confidence.

Another thing you may find important if you decide that competition is not your thing, some instructors do a lot of showing with their students and can be out of town a lot. That means your lesson either often gets canceled or rescheduled for another time in the week.


Just a basic rundown. Hope it helps you get started.
mslady254 and Chasin Ponies like this.

“You spend your whole life with horses and just about the time you think you have them figured out, a horse comes along that tells you otherwise.” –quote from my very wizened trainer


Reiningcatsanddogs is offline  
post #3 of 14 Old 01-11-2015, 10:15 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 50
• Horses: 0
Be prepared for some trial and error- it can take a while to find the right fit, and your needs will most likely change over time as well. Ask around if you can, book a lesson or two and see how you go. Good luck!
beau159 likes this.
PonyCrazyGirlsMum is offline  
post #4 of 14 Old 01-12-2015, 02:56 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: NWA
Posts: 7
• Horses: 0
Thanks for your replies! We are both very interested in trail and endurance riding, and of course with competitions. :) We are actually trying to figure out if western or english would be better. I love watching rodeo but have always wanted to try jumping as well. I think maybe english would be a better fit for now? The little bit that I did ride when I was younger was always western, so I've never ridden english, though I've always wanted to.

There are quite a few barns in my area, we are calling a couple tomorrow to ask some questions and see if we can come out and see what they're all about sometime later this week or early next week. I am so excited! Just the thought of being near horses again soon makes me so happy. Hopefully later this year I'll be able to join the 2015 trail thread.
ztensra is offline  
post #5 of 14 Old 01-12-2015, 04:10 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 50
• Horses: 0
Just remember that you don't have to pick now what it is you want to do long term. Start with basic lessons, see what takes your fancy in time (and it WILL take time) and go from there.

In other words, start with learning to ride, and basic horsemanship. These will take time to learn. Once you've got those things under control, then you can adapt for your chosen discipline.

Just start at the beginning and enjoy the process!
PonyCrazyGirlsMum is offline  
post #6 of 14 Old 01-12-2015, 04:25 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New South Wales, Australia
Posts: 4,863
• Horses: 1
I think starting with English can be a great idea. I haven't done a lot of western but I've found, as an English rider, that switching over has been pretty simple with what I have already learned. However I have heard from people riding western their whole lives that switching to an English saddle can be a big change! English to western seems a little bit easier.

First get a feel for the places you want. Ask them what services they offer, and think about what you want. Do you want private lessons or group lessons? Weekends or weeknights or weekdays? Are they in your price range? Do they offer trails, or only arena lessons? You might ask what disciplines they teach, and if their instructors are certified.

If they seem to offer what you're looking for you can always ask if you can come by sometime and watch someone else's lesson. That will give you an opportunity to suss out the instructor, the horses and vibe of the place. Notice if the students seem to get involved, or are there mainly stuff? Is it clean and not too smelly? Are the horses healthy and friendly? Is there turnouts for them?

The major thing is going to be if you feel comfortable there. You might want a big bustling place, or a smaller, more personal one. An ambitious instructor or a more laid back one. You can always ask for an introductory lesson, or just sign up for a month or two and then at the end evaluate it.

There is no harm in seeing multiple places either, and having multiple lessons with different instructors until you find the right one.

Good luck!
natisha and dlady like this.
Saskia is offline  
post #7 of 14 Old 01-12-2015, 05:44 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Orange County, NC
Posts: 6,303
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia View Post
The major thing is going to be if you feel comfortable there. You might want a big bustling place, or a smaller, more personal one. An ambitious instructor or a more laid back one. You can always ask for an introductory lesson, or just sign up for a month or two and then at the end evaluate it.

There is no harm in seeing multiple places either, and having multiple lessons with different instructors until you find the right one.
This. Teaching is a skill, and there are a lot of very knowledgeable and personally successful instructors that are absolutely terrible teachers.
waresbear, piglet and dlady like this.

On the sixth day, God created the Quarter Horse.
On the seventh day, he Painted the good ones.
PaintHorseMares is offline  
post #8 of 14 Old 01-12-2015, 11:57 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 7,334
• Horses: 3
Trial and error, on finding a trainer.

I've been riding for over 25 years and I still go take lessons off and on. There are some trainers that I won't be going back to, and some that I still routinely work with.

Some of it is skill level. Sometimes I feel like the trainer may not have the skills I am looking for. But some of it is personality too. Hence the English trainer that bashed barrel racing right in front of my face ... well I won't be going back to her.

So I would call around and see what places have to offer. Then go try! If you don't click with someone, don't be afraid to try someone else.

∞•*˚ Βгįťţαňγ ˚*•∞
It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
beau159 is offline  
post #9 of 14 Old 01-13-2015, 06:05 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: NWA
Posts: 7
• Horses: 0
Thanks for your advice and suggestions everyone! We called around a bit and found one that sounds perfect. We're going to set up a time next week to come out and take a look around and observe a lesson. I'm really excited! They seem like they really know their stuff and that they really love bringing people and horses together.

Here's the link to their page if anyone is interested.

http://m.equantumhorsemanship.com/?u...%2ecom%2f#2692

I noticed they price their lessons by hours. 1 hour = 50$ but you get discounts the more lessons you buy at once. They also told us since me and my husband are taking lessons together, we share the hours between us. Like instead of buying 1 hour each for 2 hours, we buy 1 hour for both of us. Does this seem like a good deal to you all? Sorry, I'm new to all this, and every other stable charged a fee per lesson, so it was a little weird to me.
ztensra is offline  
post #10 of 14 Old 01-14-2015, 10:36 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 7,334
• Horses: 3
$50 for a 1 hour lesson is pretty common in my area, or close to it.
Chasin Ponies likes this.

∞•*˚ Βгįťţαňγ ˚*•∞
It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
beau159 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tips on finding a good leasee for my horse?? mangomelon Horse Talk 1 08-13-2014 10:59 AM
Finding an instructor? rookie Dressage 2 11-30-2012 12:12 AM
Finding the right trainer/instructor Dark Horse Horse Training 28 01-28-2012 11:14 AM
Help finding a riding instructor!! sweetbelle Horse Riding & Horse Activity 5 06-09-2011 12:56 PM
Finding a good english lesson barn? Rowzy English Riding 5 03-27-2010 02:44 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome