Trailering in for lessons? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 27Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 23 Old 11-30-2015, 05:38 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,563
• Horses: 2
Thanks for all the replies - I wasn't sure whether this was that common, but apparently it is. I also figure that since my daughter will want to do some occasional shows, I will need the ability to trailer her. I will talk to the coach and see what she says... I hadn't even thought of the fact that they may provide a trailering service themselves.

So I guess that raises another question - do I buy a trailer or offer to 'rent' my neighbor's trailer? They almost never use it and have offered it to me before (that's where the horse is boarded), but if I were to use it often, I would offer to pay for the use of it. That raises some questions about insurance... and I've never hauled a trailer, though my husband has and I could probably learn. We have a truck that is suitable to pull it. Lots to think about!
Acadianartist is offline  
post #12 of 23 Old 11-30-2015, 05:45 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Michigan, USA
Posts: 1,067
• Horses: 0
Well, when I had a trailer it was insured like a car, so your neighbors probably have it insured. Your insurance would probably also cover if you are driving.

Around here, one can rent a trailer for $25.00 a day insurance included (as long as you have car/driver's insurance) and $45.00 for the weekend. Longer times rented gets a break. Of course, you must return the trailer clean. Trail riders who just go for the day are the most common ones who use it.

Before buying, I would try renting the neighbor's since they offered.
Acadianartist likes this.
Whinnie is offline  
post #13 of 23 Old 11-30-2015, 06:06 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 5,323
• Horses: 1
Trailering to lessons is definitely a common thing IME. For jumping lessons in particular, it's beneficial to be at the trainer's arena, since she will have all the jumping equipment necessary (and probably already set up and ready to go!) I dislike doing it very often since my truck is also my daily driver and I can't leave it hooked up before or after I use it. I actually stopped taking lessons with a trainer that I liked very much because the parking setup at her barn was not particularly trailer-friendly and it really stressed me out when cars were parked very close to where I had to back up...

I'd call your insurance about the borrowed/rented trailer and make sure they'll cover you if anything were to happen while you were towing it. If that's not an issue, make sure the trailer is safe and well maintained, and then go for it. If you find that you're using it a lot, you can always consider getting your own trailer down the road.

ETA- Even though your daughter is more interested in jumping, I'd consider having her continue dressage/flat lessons on a regular basis even if it's not every week. I personally really love dressage, but for those who don't, it's kind of like having to eat your vegetables before your dessert. It's good for her continuing education to have to focus on flat work as well as jumps!
khorses23 and Acadianartist like this.

“The horse is a mirror to your soul. Sometimes you might not like what you see. Sometimes you will.” - Buck Brannaman
"Nothing forced can ever be beautiful." - Xenophon
verona1016 is offline  
post #14 of 23 Old 11-30-2015, 09:09 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,563
• Horses: 2
Well I talked to the trainer and offered to trailer in for one private lesson to see if a) my daughter wants to take lessons from her, b) they "click" and c) I can deal with trailering in on a regular basis. My neighbors offered to trailer us in for the cost of the gas (about 20$). This way we don't have to worry about insurance issues and we can decide what we want to do from there.

verona1016 - I'm not opposed to her continuing the dressage, but won't it be confusing for her to keep being told to change her position, stirrup length, etc.? And the majority of her jumping lessons were always spent on flat work with the jumps being the icing on the cake at the end. Finally, to be honest, if I'm trailering in and paying for jumping lessons, I'm not sure I can afford dressage lessons as well. I want to see how the trailering in goes and then make a decision. We could also continue with the dressage for a few months and go back to jumping in the spring.

One thing I really liked about talking to this coach (who sounds really fabulous) is that if my daughter takes lessons from her, she will be part of a barn. Even if she brings in her own horse, they will haul her and her horse to events and she will be on their "team" (they have an amazing, gigantic trailer with living quarters, showers, etc., that they share with the competitors). I think she will love being part of a group rather than doing a lot of one-on-one lessons at a private barn. That may be worth the cost of a trailer.

Our first lesson with her is on December 12th. I'll let you know how that goes! Thanks again to all of you for your suggestions.
Whinnie likes this.
Acadianartist is offline  
post #15 of 23 Old 12-01-2015, 09:24 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 5,722
• Horses: 3
The big thing about trailering regularly is to be organized ! I trailer 1-2 horses twice or three times a week during show season. I always have water buckets, muck bucket, and pitchfork in the trailer. If your daughter puts boots on her horse, they could go on before it gets in the trailer. It's also not a bad idea to have a small brush box that you keep in your truck or trailer because it saves you lugging stuff back and forth all the time.
Posted via Mobile Device
Acadianartist likes this.
gypsygirl is offline  
post #16 of 23 Old 12-01-2015, 10:01 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 7,436
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post

I'm not opposed to her continuing the dressage, but won't it be confusing for her to keep being told to change her position, stirrup length, etc.?
I doubt it.

Kid's brains are like sponges. NOW is the best time to learn lots of new things.

Obviously it's understandable if you can only afford one or the other for the time being, but I wouldn't be worried about your daughter, especially if she expresses interest in both.
Acadianartist likes this.

∞•*˚ Βгįťţαňγ ˚*•∞
It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
beau159 is offline  
post #17 of 23 Old 12-01-2015, 10:17 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 5,722
• Horses: 3
^^ us Eventers do both all the time :)
Posted via Mobile Device
BearPony and Acadianartist like this.
gypsygirl is offline  
post #18 of 23 Old 12-02-2015, 12:38 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 7,436
• Horses: 3
I'll go to a local horse show and do the Hunter classes in the morning (rail class, pattern class, and 2 low jumps class), then do the Western classes (WP, horsemanship, ranch horse, reining), and then do the speed events (barrels poles, etc). Everything on the same horse too! With the exception of the English classes.

Variety is the spice of life, I say!
jenkat86 and Acadianartist like this.

∞•*˚ Βгįťţαňγ ˚*•∞
It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
beau159 is offline  
post #19 of 23 Old 12-02-2015, 12:47 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 5,323
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
verona1016 - I'm not opposed to her continuing the dressage, but won't it be confusing for her to keep being told to change her position, stirrup length, etc.? And the majority of her jumping lessons were always spent on flat work with the jumps being the icing on the cake at the end. Finally, to be honest, if I'm trailering in and paying for jumping lessons, I'm not sure I can afford dressage lessons as well. I want to see how the trailering in goes and then make a decision. We could also continue with the dressage for a few months and go back to jumping in the spring.
I don't think most riders find it confusing at all- like gyspygirl said, eventers do it all the time I help coach the 4-H team at my barn and most of the kids have their preferred discipline but practice and compete at most anything that's being offered, from dressage and jumping to western gaming.

If the jumping lessons have good solid flatwork built into them, that may be sufficient, but all too often I see flatwork before jumping that's just treated as a warm up and not something to work on in its own right. I started taking riding lessons as a young adult at a jumping barn and they really glossed over a lot of really basic stuff- I didn't even know what I was missing until I ended up moving and finding a barn that focused more on dressage. It was amazing to me how much stuff I hadn't been taught! I went back to jumping a couple years later and it made such a big difference for me. I know not every jumping barn is like the one I started at, but it's definitely something to keep in mind.

Cost is always a factor (those lesson fees do add up quickly!) but you could maybe 'trade' a jumping lesson for a dressage lesson every so often- for example, if your daughter is in weekly jumping lessons, skip every 3rd or 4th jumping lesson and do a dressage lesson instead.
Acadianartist likes this.

“The horse is a mirror to your soul. Sometimes you might not like what you see. Sometimes you will.” - Buck Brannaman
"Nothing forced can ever be beautiful." - Xenophon
verona1016 is offline  
post #20 of 23 Old 12-02-2015, 12:54 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ashland, OR
Posts: 8,466
• Horses: 1
Growing up we always hauled to the trainer. Even in snow, rain, sleet, ice, nothing stopped us - We would be pushing snow on the bumper pulling in.

Now that I am training myself, I just sigh when people ask me to come out to their place - Mostly because it takes twice as long (at least), I don't have access to my equipment, I don't know what sort of setup you have, or what I'm to be prepared for.

And here's a bonus you might not have considered - Your property is NOT covered on my insurance. If your kid was to get hurt while I was instructing on a property I do not have insured - I am very liable if you decide to blame me. That's a big blow to a respected trainer.

Now, I will go off property occasionally for a fee - But it is very rare, and only under extreme circumstances.

I would see about hauling in. It is slightly more hassle for you but it will make things a lot safer, and if your daughter gets hurt she will be covered by the barn with no bad impact on the trainer.
beau159 and Acadianartist like this.

Pssh.I didn't pick up the wrong lead
It's called a counter canter...
...A very advanced maneuver.
SorrelHorse is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
trailering ozarkmama Horse Training 4 07-05-2012 11:24 AM
Trailering--Help?? The Northwest Cowgirl Horse Training 20 06-22-2012 04:13 PM
Trailering myhorselegs Horse Training 10 05-20-2010 06:41 PM
Trailering stacieandtheboys Horse Training 3 10-30-2009 10:10 PM
Trailering lessons G and K's Mom Horse Videos 0 06-17-2009 01:58 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome