trialing horse - first time owner - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 28 Old 08-30-2014, 09:21 PM Thread Starter
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trialing horse - first time owner

so i've found a horse i'm interested in that i am getting a 1 week trial on. the only reason the owner is letting it go on trial is because she's healing from an abcess (happened in july) and she would be lame on a ppe (she's ok walking on grass but was having a hard time with very packed down arena gravel/sand/etc). she also had no shoes on (she should have had shoes on to begin with, abcess or not). i am getting shoes put on immediately when she gets there. i need to trial her to try and figure out if the lameness is because the abcess or something else.

what should be my plan of action to help her get acclimated to her new surroundings? ideally i wouldn't ride her for a week but that's not possible obviously. i would give her a day or 2 to acclimate and still take it easy on her. i was thinking some time grooming and hand grazing would be good.

if it makes a difference she is also going from 24/7 pasture to at least 3-4 hours a day turnout (otherwise in stall). i'm guessing my barn will try to turn her out as much as possible while she's there.

i'm trying to hold in my excitement about her because i just had a horse fail a ppe (and this can very much happen again because of the lameness).
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post #2 of 28 Old 08-30-2014, 09:29 PM
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IME, a horse that is even somewhat broke should be safe to ride almost as soon as you pull them off the trailer. If they aren't, then there is some holes in the training that would need to be addressed.

The whole "let them settle in" thing never really made much sense to me. Horses that get hauled all over the continent for rodeos or shows or trail rides don't get a week or more to "settle" to the new surroundings before being expected to behave under saddle. Why should the expectation be any less for any other horse in the world? Anyway, sorry for my off topic rant LOL.

Even my customer horses that I got in for training, I would frequently be riding them either the same day they arrived or the day after...and these were often horses that had not been ridden.


Personally, if it was me and I could afford it, I'd go ahead and get a PPE and include x-rays of the legs and hooves. A good vet should be able to tell you whether the lameness is actually due to an abscess or whether there may be something more serious lurking in there too.
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post #3 of 28 Old 08-30-2014, 10:25 PM
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I feel like going from 24/7 turnout to only 3-4 hours of turnout a day will actually make her behavior undesirable and she might be naughtier under saddle, but I can't be certain since I don't know this mare.


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post #4 of 28 Old 08-31-2014, 06:03 AM
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If it was me I would rather have a vet take a look than try and figure it out myself. Even if its not a full PPE it would give you a better idea of what you are dealing with. If the horse isn't completely sound right now then it doesn't seem like a very ideal time to be doing a trial or working her.
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post #5 of 28 Old 08-31-2014, 07:59 AM
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Personally-I wouldn't touch this with a 10 ft pole. Owner should get her sound, then sell her. If the horse has had the lameness since July, what is going to happen in one week to make her sound? I agree, if you are really interested in this horse I would wait, and or get a PPE of sorts from a vet to see what is really going on. I am a bit suspicious on this one. Most folks I know who are selling a horse do not try to sell a lame one, with lots of excuses as to why.
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post #6 of 28 Old 08-31-2014, 09:42 AM
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I would not be putting shoes on the horse without first getting a vet do a lameness examine/x-rays and determine if there truly is an abcess. Usually once an abcess blows out the pain goes away. If the horse has bad feet and is just ouchy due to bad feet that is different, which is why it would be a good reason to consult a vet before you go putting a lot of time and money into this horse.

Horse shopping can take a while to find the right one, don't rush it or settle just because your tired of looking. Your goal is to find a horse that you can spend years enjoying, not taking on someone elses problem.
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post #7 of 28 Old 08-31-2014, 11:58 AM
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I'm with franknbeans... Especially as a first time owner, I would get something that can absolutely pass a PPE. It will save you a lot of potential trouble.
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post #8 of 28 Old 08-31-2014, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
IME, a horse that is even somewhat broke should be safe to ride almost as soon as you pull them off the trailer. If they aren't, then there is some holes in the training that would need to be addressed.

The whole "let them settle in" thing never really made much sense to me. Horses that get hauled all over the continent for rodeos or shows or trail rides don't get a week or more to "settle" to the new surroundings before being expected to behave under saddle. Why should the expectation be any less for any other horse in the world? Anyway, sorry for my off topic rant LOL.

Even my customer horses that I got in for training, I would frequently be riding them either the same day they arrived or the day after...and these were often horses that had not been ridden.


Personally, if it was me and I could afford it, I'd go ahead and get a PPE and include x-rays of the legs and hooves. A good vet should be able to tell you whether the lameness is actually due to an abscess or whether there may be something more serious lurking in there too.
I agree with this. You shouldn't need to give the horse time to "settle in". Horses travel to new places to be ridden every day, and they do just fine. If not, that indicates a problem. If it makes the rider more comfortable then perhaps wait until the next day to ride, but I would rather see how the horse reacts to being ridden in the new place.

I also wouldn't take this horse home until he's sound. The owner should get the lameness problems under control before putting the horse back on the market, so I'd pass for now and ask the owner to contact you when the horse is sound if he's still available.
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post #9 of 28 Old 08-31-2014, 12:28 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by franknbeans View Post
Personally-I wouldn't touch this with a 10 ft pole. Owner should get her sound, then sell her. If the horse has had the lameness since July, what is going to happen in one week to make her sound? I agree, if you are really interested in this horse I would wait, and or get a PPE of sorts from a vet to see what is really going on. I am a bit suspicious on this one. Most folks I know who are selling a horse do not try to sell a lame one, with lots of excuses as to why.
my trainer thinks with shoes and better footing, she won't be lame.
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post #10 of 28 Old 08-31-2014, 12:34 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by gssw5 View Post
I would not be putting shoes on the horse without first getting a vet do a lameness examine/x-rays and determine if there truly is an abcess. Usually once an abcess blows out the pain goes away. If the horse has bad feet and is just ouchy due to bad feet that is different, which is why it would be a good reason to consult a vet before you go putting a lot of time and money into this horse.

Horse shopping can take a while to find the right one, don't rush it or settle just because your tired of looking. Your goal is to find a horse that you can spend years enjoying, not taking on someone elses problem.
i really like her, that's why i wanted to go through with finding out if this is just a minor problem. there is a small hole in the front of the hoof that does show evidence of an abcess. i just had what i thought was the perfect horse (on paper, although i don't think i clicked as much with his personality), fail a ppe because of lameness (that could only be seen via flexion). by bad feet, do you mean she needs shoes or something else? she is a thoroughbred so they aren't known for having great feet.

the owner is hauling her to my barn for free so maybe i should have a vet look at her then? i wasn't going for the full ppe (and expensive xrays if necessary) if she was still lame at the end of the week trial.

Last edited by gymangel812; 08-31-2014 at 12:41 PM.
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