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post #1 of 10 Old 08-04-2014, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
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Trouble finding detailed info

Hi I'm wondering if anyone can point me in the right direction.

I have been searching the forum, google, and pinterest trying to find some good place to start my research on owning and caring for a Shetland Pony ( the fat stocky type) . I find tons of Horse care but not specified to Sheltlands. I read somewhere that their care is different. I have never owned horses so need to learn as much as possible. I can find all the cute photos all day long but can not find detailed info on whats the best fence, how and when to feed, how to figure how much to feed them, routine care, what shots will they needs, how much weight can they pull/carry. I have a 7yo and 6yo both small for their age , and they would like to ride and show for 4-H eventually. What equiptment , first aid kit, ect will I need. What do I need use for food and water. Ect Most everything I am finding is only about the breed history, max and min height, weight, ect.

Thanks
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post #2 of 10 Old 08-04-2014, 11:30 AM
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Aside from feeding, the care is largely the same as it would be for a horse. They still need farrier care, vaccinations, etc with the same regularity.

Shetlands (and other pony breeds) tend to be able to seemingly get fat on air, so they really need a low calorie diet for them- low sugar, low starch, small quantities, etc. Often they need a grazing muzzle when out on pasture, or can't go out on pasture at all.

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post #3 of 10 Old 08-04-2014, 11:41 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by verona1016 View Post
Aside from feeding, the care is largely the same as it would be for a horse. They still need farrier care, vaccinations, etc with the same regularity.

Shetlands (and other pony breeds) tend to be able to seemingly get fat on air, so they really need a low calorie diet for them- low sugar, low starch, small quantities, etc. Often they need a grazing muzzle when out on pasture, or can't go out on pasture at all.
Thank you, I will start reading the horse care sections.

Do you by chance know if they will eat wild blueberry and black berry plants? They are we are clearing out has tons of wild berries and I am unsure if I should leave them or remove them.

Thanks
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post #4 of 10 Old 08-04-2014, 03:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apyl View Post
Hi I'm wondering if anyone can point me in the right direction.

I have been searching the forum, google, and pinterest trying to find some good place to start my research on owning and caring for a Shetland Pony ( the fat stocky type) . I find tons of Horse care but not specified to Sheltlands. I read somewhere that their care is different. I have never owned horses so need to learn as much as possible. I can find all the cute photos all day long but can not find detailed info on whats the best fence, how and when to feed, how to figure how much to feed them, routine care, what shots will they needs, how much weight can they pull/carry. I have a 7yo and 6yo both small for their age , and they would like to ride and show for 4-H eventually. What equiptment , first aid kit, ect will I need. What do I need use for food and water. Ect Most everything I am finding is only about the breed history, max and min height, weight, ect.

Thanks

Have you tried contacting their breed association?

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post #5 of 10 Old 08-05-2014, 02:50 AM
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Hi, as others have said, as Shetlands are just mini horses, same as a horse basically. Obviously exercise etc will be different, unless there are some good very small riders around. You won't really need breed specific info on how to care for them or what equipment you need.

So... for eg. they will still need around 2%bwt daily in forage, but as with big 'easy keepers', you will likely need to use a slow feed haynet, muzzle for grazing, ensure grass/hay's not high sugar, or soak the hay before feeding to leach out some of the sugars. I highly doubt you'd ever need anything remotely 'high octane' for them, such as grain, but I do think appropriate nutritional supplementation is important. As with big horses, they're also herd animals, need company. If 2 aren't an option though, you can always pair one with a sheep, goat(to eat blackberries!) or such.

If you're thinking of getting one as a pet, great. But if wanting riding animals for your kids, they may not be too big for one now, but even if they're little, at 6 & 7yo, they will outgrow a shetland very quickly. Whereas a bigger pony - welsh mountain for eg - who is around 12hh should be able to carry small boys for a fair few more years at least. My 12yo daughter is sadly just about outgrown her 12hh pony now...

Blueberry & blackberry. No idea about blueberry, but I'd guess not. Horses love blackberries though, enough to brave some thorns generally. Not sure how noxious & prolific they are wherever you're from, but I wouldn't be leaving blackberries in for the sake of a treat for a short spell each year.... altho I do make the most of other properties where they are, & take an icecream bucket and my horse... Takes a while to fill, counting "one for me, one for you, one for the pot"
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post #6 of 10 Old 08-05-2014, 10:13 AM
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A true Shetland, not the American Shetland, is I believe what the op is talking about. American Shetlands are finer and more refined, much like the minis. I believe the op is talking about the true Shetland, a little taller, stockier and much better suited to riding. My little 21 year old pony mare is what we believe to be a Shetland. She's 42" tall, and carried me until I was almost 12 with ease, though at 12 I was barely 5 foot tall and just about 85 pounds, maybe less. She's wonderful with young children, very quiet and sensible.
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post #7 of 10 Old 08-05-2014, 01:46 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you everyone for your replies. You've all been helpful! :)
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post #8 of 10 Old 08-05-2014, 06:36 PM
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Yes Cassie, the real ones are certainly sturdier than the US 'copies'! How much they can carry is indeed is also subjective, depending on where you're coming from. Horses are often asked to do more than is good for them, and will often cope with it for years too. I don't want a horse to suffer at all, so I prefer to stick to the general guide of not exceeding 15% of the horse's bodyweight, including tack. *Although, shorter, stockier horses are better able to carry than light, leggy horses & bwt percentage is but a rough guide.
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post #9 of 10 Old 08-06-2014, 09:42 AM
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In terms of rider size vs pony, my DD who is ten (nearly 11 ) and kinda stocky build, regularly rides a good sized Shetland. Admittedly he is a biggish Shetland, between 9 and 10 hands and very stocky. He happily walks, trots, canters, pops over little jumps like a foot high, and has even galloped once, with her. She loves him to bits, even though he is not hers, he belongs to her riding school. If you get a nice sized, sound and well trained Shetland, they are great beginner ponies for kids.
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post #10 of 10 Old 08-06-2014, 10:21 AM
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Wild blueberries grow in my pasture from time to time and the horses don't touch the berries or the plants. But, they will eat wild strawberries, not the plant. Fortunately for the horses the berries are small and few. Don't you forage for edible berries? Excellent source of micronutrients. My sturdy Shetland mare, who stood 44" at the withers, could easily carry my 125 lbs. when bareback.



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