Trying out a horse - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 34 Old 07-19-2015, 09:39 PM
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I went to look at a horse & when the guy went to bridle him he flew backwards, snapped the leadrope & took off (the horse not the guy). The guy said he had never done that before.
I bought the horse anyway & he never did pull back again.

I believe a lot of people aren't purposefully trying to scam but really think their horses are better than they are.
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post #12 of 34 Old 07-19-2015, 10:13 PM
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Originally Posted by natisha View Post
I went to look at a horse & when the guy went to bridle him he flew backwards, snapped the leadrope & took off (the horse not the guy). The guy said he had never done that before.
I bought the horse anyway & he never did pull back again.

I believe a lot of people aren't purposefully trying to scam but really think their horses are better than they are.
^^This is my reasoning for a trial. You get a better period of time to evaluate the horse and make sure they are going to be a good fit. Under normal circumstances, I think I would be more weary of someone that didn't want you to do a trial before buying, or at least give you more than a short window of time to evaluate.
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post #13 of 34 Old 07-19-2015, 10:50 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by natisha View Post
I believe a lot of people aren't purposefully trying to scam but really think their horses are better than they are.
The guy said he was selling the horse for someone else. I'm not sure this guy was purposefully misrepresenting the horse but I have a feeling he knew more than he was letting on. If the horse had been the proposed age I might have considered it. It was a sound good looking horse with a good head on it's shoulders it just needed some more saddle and groundwork time. And some TLC it's mare and tail were a huge mat and hooves long and chipped. It seemed more scared and unsure than mean and let me touch it all over once it was caught even stick my fingers in it's ears without more than a nervous twinge.
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post #14 of 34 Old 07-20-2015, 06:41 AM
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If there are alarm bells for anything listen to them.
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post #15 of 34 Old 07-20-2015, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Saskia View Post
If there are alarm bells for anything listen to them.
Selling a horse for someone else? Unless it was a professional trainer selling a horse for a client I would be suspicious of that. It puts the "seller" in the position of being able to say "That is all I was told", and therefor not responsible for any hidden problems. Who makes out the bill of sale in these situations?
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post #16 of 34 Old 07-20-2015, 10:46 AM
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^ We bought a horse like that and it really isn't so bad if it's done right. The horse's trainer was selling him for his owner, who was out of the country. She had known the horse his whole life and kept tabs on him to help him land softly in new homes, so it worked out great. The owner did the bill of sale- and she took care of everything else for him. We loved that we have the horse's full history including illnesses, lameness or lack thereof, training, etc.

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be in your journey, but not all of
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post #17 of 34 Old 07-20-2015, 11:21 AM
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I Know the following might cost more money, but, don't just look at horses that are cheap, where that seller has maybe one horse to sell, and thus no reputation at stake, far as repeat sales
As a breeder, I always presented my horses honestly, as it is like anyone standing behind their product
The purchase price of a horse, is often the cheapest part
I don't know what price range you are looking in, but a well broke horse is worth some money. Sometimes, you can find one cheap, where that owner is in a tight situation, and is more concerned in finding a good home for that horse, then selling him at fair market value
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post #18 of 34 Old 07-20-2015, 11:30 AM
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I'll give you a breeder's perspective.
A good well broke started young horse has to be worth $3,000, just to break even, and you better enjoy what you are doing, as you aren't being paid for your training!
I would get acall like this at times.
"hi, we are looking for a well broke Appaloosa, black and white, that anyone can ride, but we don't need the papers ( ie, want that horse cheap )
Ask how much they are willing to pay, and the answer was, 'well, somewhere between $1000 and $1,500 >
My answer- the all breed horse sale at Innisfail down the road, was on the next Sat.!
Might as well raise cows in that case-more money and no training needed.
Sorry, but just a sort of rant of mine, and not directed at you, but so often people complain about the quality/training of a horse they go to see, and they are just looking at cheap horses someone wants to dump
Not always, but often you get what you pay for, and why should horses be an exception?
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post #19 of 34 Old 07-20-2015, 12:43 PM
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Horse prices are funny that way. Yes, I agree, a good, sounds, properly started and ridden horse should be worth something.

But at the same time, too many people are trying to sell their mid-teen, not ridden consistently in years, never shown, slightly arthritic (but totally sound with injections) "project horses with tons of potential" for thousands of $$.

For someone new, it is sometimes hard to distiguish where they are paying for real value and where they are paying for the seller's exaggerated expectations.

And sometimes you can make a real steal on a great horse, cause the owner needs to sell the horse in a certain amount of time and would rather see it going to a good, suitable home than make maximum money.

All I can say is be patient, watch the horse market for a while, try out anything that seems worth trying, and don't let yourself get pressured into buying. Horses are a buyer's market.
I remember coming home almost crying from frustration a few times, cause the horse in reality was SO far from advertised.
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post #20 of 34 Old 07-20-2015, 01:14 PM
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As a buyer, my trainer or myself look at a listed price and decide whether or not the horse is worth what's being listed. I've never heard of people coming to a breeder with a checklist and a budget--interesting~

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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