Turning a beginner horse into a dangerous animal - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 29 Old 04-07-2017, 05:26 PM Thread Starter
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Turning a beginner horse into a dangerous animal

I hope this thread doesn't go south and I hope the people that need to read the attached link from a rescue read it.


https://heartofphoenix.org/2017/01/2...gerous-animal/

^^^This kind of things happens all the time and sadly the people who need to sit up and pay attention rarely recognize themselves.

Inexperienced horseman often have lofty visions of themselves and that often results in a trip to the ER and a good horse ruined.

Or, someone wants a horse, has almost no money, and rescues a horse in a kill pen --- not giving a thought to the vet vet bills that might ensue because the horse has health or behavior issues the previous owner didn't want to deal with.

I am likely preaching to the choir as the people who really do need to read the link won't see themselves. --- they will have lofty but unreal visions of themselves as a horseman and silently declare "that doesn't apply to me"

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #2 of 29 Old 04-07-2017, 05:37 PM
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Walk, I hit the link but it comes up a blank page. Am I doing something wrong?

On your narrative, I definitely agree. People tend to think they know everything and expect the horse to conform. The worst I've noticed are the people that profess to know so much. I'd much rather learn from someone that does express they have so much to prove. I'd like to read the article though.
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post #3 of 29 Old 04-07-2017, 05:52 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue View Post
Walk, I hit the link but it comes up a blank page. Am I doing something wrong?

On your narrative, I definitely agree. People tend to think they know everything and expect the horse to conform. The worst I've noticed are the people that profess to know so much. I'd much rather learn from someone that does express they have so much to prove. I'd like to read the article though.
Blue, when I hit the link, it does stay blank for 10-20 seconds maybe? Just when I think it won't open, it does.

This time of day is prime time for Net usage so maybe that's slowing things down. I found this on another forum and it has generated a lot of conversation. It could be the link is also getting overloaded.

If it doesn't open, try going to heartofphoenix.org, then searching the blogs. It really is a well written and thoughtful article, taking the side of the horse:)
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A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #4 of 29 Old 04-07-2017, 05:57 PM
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Prime net usage for sure, down to 9pm or so. =/

But page stays blank for awhile, eventually loading.

But if that still doesn't work, copied the text--

Date: January 29, 2017Author: T. Creamer 22
Turning a Beginner horse into a dangerous animal; the story of too many “first, second and third” horses: What you need to know about the difficulty and expense of horse ownership before you take the next step.

Did you know one of the most common reasons horses end up discarded, neglected or with behavioral problems traces back to a buyer / owner who had far too little experience (but probably believed their 3 trail rides during vacations meant they were excellent riders) and / or too little ability to cover the enormous costs of owning and caring for a horse?

If you are truly a newbie, please, for the love of a horse, do not buy or adopt or pick up a free horse.

Taking 10 lessons at age 12 doesn’t mean you’re not a total beginner. Riding horses on trail rides at stables while on vacation for a 1 to 10 years also doesn’t mean you have any real experience. Feeding 1,000 carrots to horses next to your grandfather’s house as a child doesn’t count. Cleaning stalls as a job as a teenager. . .nope. Not super helpful.

Sometimes the stars align and total new owners make it work. It is rare, and it is too rare and typically too harmful for us to recommend.

We’ve saved too many who bear the scars of “newbie” owners.

They have been mishandled, their bodies and minds misused. . sometimes through sheer ignorance only.

If you cannot afford lessons, you cannot afford a horse. Unless you’ve ridden and cared for a horse under a trained eye and hand, you will not likely do the horse any service.

Did you know even a beginner safe horse can end up damaged and dangerous in the hands of inexperienced person or family?

Beginner safe really doesn’t “usually” mean any untrained person can do anything with the horse. It means a beginner can ride the horse under supervision and be safe.

No giant animal with a prey instinct is truly safe for just any new rider / handler without a trained eye looking on and offering instruction.

You have lucked out with a rare creature if you’ve found an exception, but it is luck only you’re working with in these cases. And regardless, if you’re a real novice and have found a tolerant and kind horse, you owe the horse something better, at any rate.

We once heard a trainer talk about how horrible it is when a novice turns a perfectly well trained, beginner suitable horse into a dangerous animal with their mistakes, and the fact is, this happens far too often.

Horses are very expensive. A luxury, really.

They aren’t especially hardy. They are extremely complex and sensitive. When they are sick, it costs even more.

They aren’t gold fish (Heck, even fish are awfully hard to keep alive), folks.

Horses require a disposable income of several thousand dollars a year each, even if you live in a very inexpensive area and keep the horse on your own property and do not need to keep the horse shod or treat any ailments beyond trims, worming, vaccines and teeth yearly (all of those things ARE a must, regardless).

Horses require knowledge. A lot of it. You have to come into the experience with knowledge, though. You also have to continue to learn.

forever. and ever.

First. . .Lessons.

Next. . . Income.

Then. . .a horse of your own.

Any other order generally puts a horse at great risk of ending up with lasting training problems, injuries or worse. Never mind that it isn’t safe for people to do it another way.

(The horse in the original image is from a craigslist ad of a horse I rescued on my own before Heart of Phoenix many years ago. He was also entirely emaciated.)

Don’t become these guys from google:

http://Forever-Farms.com
Babydoll Southdown Sheep
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post #5 of 29 Old 04-07-2017, 06:16 PM
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Excellent wording!

I personally feel that to own an animal or have children you should be required to have a license and take approbate classes. It's a HUGE responsibility that too many take for granted and feel it's their right.

We've all made mistakes. I've had horses for years and still learning daily. I also still remember my first horse. A saint she was.
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post #6 of 29 Old 04-07-2017, 07:32 PM
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I really hate to discourage novice folks from getting into horses by buying a cheap horse but I have done it many times. Most don't listen and treat me like I am the fun police. I tell them, take lessons, lease a horse, get to know your way around horses and then go looking for a horse. No, ignored. Then they get a horse, it won't listen, bucks them off or they can't catch it and they call me, can you take this horse off my hands? No, and this is what I said to a relative (hubby's side, but there was one on my side as well), you acquired the horse by yourself, you can unload it by yourself, maybe call the former owner and see if they want it back, free of charge. Those relatives still blame me for some reason and won't talk to me because of this, and this all happened about 15 years ago. You can talk to people til you are blue in the face, most don't listen, even relatives.

I am not here to promote anythingNo, that's not true, I am here to promote everything equestrian and everyone enjoying horses!
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post #7 of 29 Old 04-07-2017, 08:04 PM
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waresbear, especially relatives!
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post #8 of 29 Old 04-07-2017, 09:20 PM
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Saw this on FB and agreed.
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post #9 of 29 Old 04-08-2017, 01:53 AM
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I am so scared of spoiling my first horse that both my instructor and BO, experienced equestrians, told me that I don't have to be so regimented with her, that I can let her get away with some small things once in a while. Nope, regimented it is. So, a year on, no signs of spoiling yet. I've even improved some small (most probably imaginary) quirks she had.
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post #10 of 29 Old 04-08-2017, 03:46 AM
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I think this can be said of all domestic animals tbh, it's just that horses are one of the most dangerous ones. I've seen a lot of nice dogs and parrots turned into bitey little monsters because owners thought they could just make it up as they went along. Sure, they're probably not going to kill you like a horse could, but it still means the animal gets neglected because they're "untameable."

Although, it can be so hard for a novice to get into horses. I'm speaking as someone who has just come from there. I thought my only option would be to buy a horse because so many people with horses for loan/share explicitly state "no novices" in their ads, or even in person. These are people who claim their horse/pony is "an easy ride," "bombproof" and "has taught children to ride." There is an awful lot of snobbery out there (I mean, to say "no novices" implies the owner thinks they aren't a novice themselves, and I know plenty very experienced horsepeople still call themselves a novice). That being said, any beginner buying a horse should still take an experienced person with them to buy a horse, and keep it under supervised training. Why take any risk with an animal big enough to do you serious harm?

I'm lucky that I found a loan/share situation that I did. The owner is always on hand to help, the horse is well trained (albeit had been out of work for a long while), and my instructors and friends will always answer any silly little question I have.
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