Two new mini weanlings - help! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 23 Old 08-31-2015, 11:37 PM
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In any foals I've had I just wrap my arms around the length of their body to contain them. Putting the halter on and taking it off is part of the desensitizing process as well as them letting you hold them still in your arms.
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post #12 of 23 Old 09-01-2015, 12:04 AM
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I would at least get in contact with someone in your area who trains mini's, I would suggest getting them to at least show you the exercises etc in person and watch you do them a few times so that they can correct any errors on your part (and be in contact so you can ask them questions)
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post #13 of 23 Old 09-01-2015, 07:41 AM Thread Starter
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Red face thanks for the advice

We plan to take everyone's advice, and we have several friends who raise horses and mini donkeys locally we will ask for support. Thank you all for the replies! : )
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post #14 of 23 Old 09-02-2015, 05:13 PM
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I'm a newish horse owner myself, and although yours are minis, it doesn't matter. They have horse brains, so the tips I'm giving you will work for them too.

Look up Sean Patrick and Clinton Anderson online. You can buy Sean's stuff very inexpensively on Amazon (book and DVD). Even though you aren't going to ride these babies, you still need to make sure they're respectful and not dangerous (even the little ones can bite, kick, and strike ... and they will if you don't do some training). My favorite thing Sean has is "Countdown to Broke". It'll give you all the basics you need to teach your babies respect and proper behavior when humans are around. There's also a great book by John Lyons called John Lyons' Bringing Up Baby. That one's fantastic for young ones. Start with that one and then move up to Sean Patrick's and you'll be all set.

Clinton Anderson teaches the same stuff, but his DVDs are very expensive.
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post #15 of 23 Old 09-02-2015, 07:02 PM
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My youngest mini I got freshly off her mom and unhandled.
She's friendly and curious, so it was easy to make friends with her and tame her.
Are your babies friendly, do they seek out attention at all, even creeping up to investigate you while you sit and ignore them is enough.
Mine came alone, but my others love me, she wanted to be apart of what we were doing, so she started coming up more and more to make friends and not be all alone.

Minis need very little grass. Can you make a small pasture, 1/2 acre, and then just hang out with them in their new pen? Wander around, fix fencing or just fiddle with it, clean the shed, rake grass, basically, be in with them, but ignore them while doing calm things.
They should get used to you over time and get more and more curious.

You could catch one and see if it has an itchy spot. Scratch it and back off for a few seconds to let it just stand near you. Then more scratches and then backig off, repeat until they stop flinching when you reach out to give them a scratch. Let them go and do it again the next day. You can mix in food treats, too. Just don't push them too far too fast.
Or you can sit in a lawn chair in the small pen and read a book, ignoring them. But you should still spend time moving around in their oen so they stop thinking you're always after them.
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post #16 of 23 Old 09-02-2015, 10:23 PM
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Hi & welcome, quick note to first post, so sorry if I (probably) repeat...

I suppose the seller or others told you you knew enough or there was nothing to it or something, to have come to the conclusion you're ready to take on 2 baby horses with no experience or knowledge of training, etc.

Unfortunately, an internet forum, youtube clips, etc, is not adequate to teach you everything about 'how to train a horse' from scratch. There are probably a lot of other things aside from 'taming' that you need to learn too. I'm hoping you have good experienced help to lean on/learn from? Use it! If you don't have experienced horsepeople/trainers to help teach you & the horses(because even if you learn the theory, green teaching green = not good), then I'd advise you pay someone to come out & work with you all.

Sooner the better you get some basic training on them, so they can be dealt with for veterinary & farriery work. Hoof maintenance should be done every 6 weeks, give or take, as for big horses. They may well need to be carefully managed regarding diet, if they're in a large, grassy paddock too. Unfortunately especially in minis, metabolic disorders & other health probs due to over feeding, over rich feed is a common concern.
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post #17 of 23 Old 09-03-2015, 10:28 AM Thread Starter
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Red face so glad I joined this Forum

to address a few of your questions ... we guess the sellers assumed we could handle this even though they knew these were our first ever horses. We have our little barn area (its really just 2.5 sided witha roof) gated off at this point, with about 1.5 acres of grass fenced in beyond it. The horses are very curious and will come up to us, we're slowly getting more handson time, and are feeding them Purina mini pellets along with wonderful hay grown by our neighbor (we can get this in abundance), and apples from our tree for treats. Bingo neighs softly when he sees me coming in the morning, and what a thrill that is! We let them out in their paddock from dusk until dawn, and then we pen them up for the day - so we can feed and socialize with them. They come into their pen freely when they see me getting their pails ready ; ) We have a chair inside the pen, and my husband and I take turns just sitting with them. We've had them a full week now, and they are much tamer but still not inclined to let us groom them - but we will persevere. Baby steps seem to be working. They have made friends with our dog, and touch noses with him eagerly. They seem to be well adjusted to their new home. We have contacted friends with horses (they have minis too), and they are coming soon to give us support. We wormed them yesterday, and are closley watching their droppings- which look great at this point. Patience seems to be the key, and we have plenty of it so are hopeful. again, thank you for all the replies..
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post #18 of 23 Old 09-03-2015, 10:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekairyn View Post
to address a few of your questions ... we guess the sellers assumed we could handle this even though they knew these were our first ever horses. We have our little barn area (its really just 2.5 sided witha roof) gated off at this point, with about 1.5 acres of grass fenced in beyond it. The horses are very curious and will come up to us, we're slowly getting more handson time, and are feeding them Purina mini pellets along with wonderful hay grown by our neighbor (we can get this in abundance), and apples from our tree for treats. Bingo neighs softly when he sees me coming in the morning, and what a thrill that is! We let them out in their paddock from dusk until dawn, and then we pen them up for the day - so we can feed and socialize with them. They come into their pen freely when they see me getting their pails ready ; ) We have a chair inside the pen, and my husband and I take turns just sitting with them. We've had them a full week now, and they are much tamer but still not inclined to let us groom them - but we will persevere. Baby steps seem to be working. They have made friends with our dog, and touch noses with him eagerly. They seem to be well adjusted to their new home. We have contacted friends with horses (they have minis too), and they are coming soon to give us support. We wormed them yesterday, and are closley watching their droppings- which look great at this point. Patience seems to be the key, and we have plenty of it so are hopeful. again, thank you for all the replies..
If you got close enough to worm you should be taking halter on and off. Not leaving it on while they are not monitored. You just need a small enough area to pen them in so they cant get away and you can do more handling. I would also get on some mini forums as they are special care. Quest wormer can kill a mini and there are other things you may learn.
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post #19 of 23 Old 09-03-2015, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by ekairyn View Post
JCnGrace, thank you so much!!!! That is exactly what I wanted to know. We will take your advice as I think we can do it ourselves instead of paying someone else. No we dont' want to show them, and I like the slow way too. We just want to enjoy their company. Your kindness is appreciated ; ) I did post their pictures in my barn, but guessed at how tall they are! Have not measure them lol
If you run into trouble doing it yourself (and you very well may-they are stubborn little creatures who will always pull one over on you if they see an opportunity)-don't hesitate to try finding a traveling trainer to stop in at least once to help!

I have worked with many people who bought minis (usually adult minis never trained) thinking they would be easy to handle. Fair but firm always with them and always treat them like a horse, not a dog. Even a mini can do a lot of damage to a human! You have the advantage here-you don't have a whole lot of built in bad habits as most adult minis do when they are not treated as horses.
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post #20 of 23 Old 09-03-2015, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by ekairyn View Post
1.5 acres of grass fenced in beyond it. The horses are very curious and will come up to us, we're slowly getting more handson time, and are feeding them Purina mini pellets along with wonderful hay grown by our neighbor (we can get this in abundance), and apples from our tree for treats.
As a hoof care practitioner who specialises in rehab, I see more than my fair share of laminitic horses & ponies, so that's where I'm coming from...

The major cause of laminitis is similar to type 2 diabetes in people, and like diabetes, there's not just one 'symptom' - horses generally suffer other health probs besides laminitis from it. When a horse is fat, or in 'good condition' long term, without regular 'hard seasons' to use up fat stores, is when these (natural) metabolic changes take place. So as with people, diet & exercise are important. Horses may also not handle sugar/starch as well as humans & this is also a big factor, especially with modern feeds & 'improved' grasses.

You may find that even that much grass & free choice hay is too much for them. Soaking & draining hay before feeding, to leach out some of the sugars can help, as can turning them out in grazing muzzles part time. These muzzles have a small hole in the bottom & allow horses to eat but tiny amounts at a time. That way, they can have free choice, but not gorge themselves. *Hopefully if well managed, you can avoid their use, at least until the horses are grown though.

Baby horses are far more easily & seriously hurt than mature animals who's bones & joints are 'set' and I wouldn't even be inclined to turn a baby out in a breakaway type halter. Keep that in mind with training too, esp training to tie etc, that just tying a baby up & letting them thrash it out until they accept being trapped is more likely to end in physical damage too. (Aside from, IMO being the totally wrong approach to training)

I don't know what's in Purina mini pellets, but I'd be inclined to be just giving them a good quality, very low dose 'ration balancer' or such, like 'Smart Pak', to give them the nutrients that may be lacking in their grass diet. *Nutrition is a... convoluted subject and I'm no nutritionist, but I do advise you do some homework, because *balanced* nutrition is important & it is not only wasteful but can even be harmful to just feed supps willy nilly or in excess. FeedXL.com is one great resource. Nutrition, as opposed to just diet/calories is also a vital factor in metabolic disorders & laminitis too.

As with people, I don't think occasional or small amounts of 'junk food' is an issue if they're healthy, it's generally 'too much of a good thing' or because they're overly sensitive(often because of 'chronic' diet issues/already 'metabolic'). Remember that minis tend to be naturally more 'sensitive' to sugars than many breeds, and that apples & the likes, while not strictly 'junk food' are full of sugar. So I'd limit things like this to perhaps one a day. Carrots are lower in sugar. But you can always dice them, then you'll have a whole pocketful of training rewards/treats out of one!
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