Uncooperative horses - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 55 Old 08-24-2014, 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag View Post
Put a knotted nylon halter under his bridle and attach your lead. Have a riding crop or 3' stick handy. The moment he moves, jump down and chase him backwards, pulling on the lead to indicate back and tap his chest. The faster the better. Make him go a good 30'. Stop, don't pet or talk to him but turn and walk back to the block and start again. He didn't learn anything this time but the second time, back him even farther and make him hustle. Then return to the block. He may need a third time before he figures it out but rarely a fourth. If you don't make him hustle the exercise is futile. Whatever you do, when you go to mount don't praise him or pet him. Just get on as tho you've both done this a thousand times. Don't allow him to walk off, He must wait until you are completely settled and ask him to move.
Great advice. It really can take some effort on your part to do this, but it will work. Your horse will probably start to lick his lips when it decides that it is easier to do what you want, instead of what it wants to do.
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post #22 of 55 Old 08-24-2014, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Cmck View Post
My husband and I have been working with a trainer all summer with relative success over some of the issues we were having as new horse owners/riders. My horse has now reverted back to being incredibly difficult to mount off a block (he's 15.2h, I'm 5') so getting directly on him from the ground (although I have done so) is a challenge. He walks off, throws out his hind end, etc. This can go on for 5 minutes. I circle him around the block, try again-if he moves I circle him more...eventually he gets the idea, but more often than not, my husband has to dismount and hold him so I can mount. Note he had a problem with this when we first got him, but had gotten much better and would stand still...now the last 3 times he's doing it again.)
Problem 2: Husband's horse is kind of lazy and would prefer to stay in the paddock- once we get him to ride out, he often stops, and as my husband telling him to turn in a certain direction and walk on, often results in spinning in circles and much ground pawing. If he can keep him moving, my horse (who leads) will walk nicely - but once the other stops, mine gets agitated and nervous and instinctively wants to turn around and head back toward him. I am able to control this, but it is certainly not ideal to spend this time fighting with my horse to either stand still & wait or to walk on.
Both my husband and I know that we are being tested, and for the most part, they eventually fall into line & we have a decent ride. When my trainer rode husband's horse w/ me this week, only a few issues arose with my horse being reluctant to go where I asked through the woods, but did comply...the main problem is that when we ride together, my husband can't get him to keep going, and so my horse reacts badly. Any advice???? Last night went pretty well and we stayed out about an hour despite their momentary lapses, but this morning husband couldn't get horse to move out at all...spinning, pawing, and ebded up bringing him back in...I continued to ride in the paddock area for half an hour, thn dismounted and mounted several more times to work on that problem. Both horses were purchased as "beginner horses that anyone could ride, blah, blah, blah..."
Possibly the easiest thing to try is to have your husband help you mount first, then he can get on. If your horse goes good down the trail, have him follow you since he is having more problems with the barn sour issue. This is of course not a fix for the training issues, but not everyone is able to fix things theirselves.
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post #23 of 55 Old 09-15-2014, 09:12 PM Thread Starter
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Update: He stands still now! Here's what I did. When I tried to mount and he moved, I got off and lunged him using the reins, in circles, making him move in both directions. Idea behind this- horse thinks: "It is easier to stand still." I think "If I get him to move his feet in the direction I want, I am alpha." I did this for a couple minutes and tried mounting again. A little weight, he stood still, I patted him & told him he was a good boy. I mounted fully and he stood...even while I picked up the right stirrup- something I always had to previously do on the move. I only had to do that exercise once. Now when I am mounting I push the saddle side to side with my hands, and if he stands I compliment him, and then I get on and he STANDS. YAY!!!!
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post #24 of 55 Old 09-15-2014, 09:21 PM
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I'm happy you found something that worked for you, Cmck.
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post #25 of 55 Old 09-16-2014, 02:06 PM
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Moving a horse when the objective is to get it to stand still, is not something I am into.

Horses are moving when you go to mount because you are letting them, may also be toeing horse, or using reins to lever up. Don't know as am not there to watch you.

But, teaching a horse a "be still" command is something I'd work on, you an use that command, park out, plant those feet, stay, or whatever works for you, but begin with, every single time, and I mean every single time, you halter and lead, bridle and lead, or walk into stall of pen and get horse caught up, STAND STILL...no talking, not patting, nothing, just you standing still, not looking at horse, and if horse moves, give your chosen command, and then just stand there.

When you are leading, stop and just stand still, facing same way as horse is, NO talking or chatting or petting, just stand there until YOU decide to move. If horse fidgets, tell it to be still, or growl low in throat, and then stand some more.

I also cue for back every time I am working with a horse that is antsy to handle, and periodically with one well trained too.

I teach back up with facing horse off to side slightly, horse should be haltered for you all, safer, me, I do it either way. But halter/lead in right hand, facing rear of horse, and with left hand on area where noseband falls, LIGHTLY...push against nose, using slight downwards motion, you want horse breaking at poll, not nose up. And quietly say "back", if horse resists, increase pressure a very slight little, and "rock" nose to chest...*you are not trying to touch nose to brisket* but a gentle rocking motion, and say back.

ONLY increase pressure if horse is resistant, and the very instant you get a backwards shift off of front end, to begin moving back, let up some on nose pressure, but continue to ask for back. Get a step at least, more are fine, but you do not want to just go to backing willy nilly here.

And remember, light as you can, feather touch at first, in all things.

This will get horse used to coming back off of nose pressure, which will transfer to bit/reins too.

I halter and then back horse before coming out of stalls, and will also just stand there, even in middle of coming out. This reinforces in horse's mind that you make the decisions, not them.

You may also need a taller mounting block too. And slightly shorten offside rein, so that if horse should move, hindquarters are coming under you, instead of swinging away. Make sure you are not toeing, and that you aren't plopping down in saddle, nor are you dragging leg over rump.

While I am firm believer in horse should get used to you not tiptoeing around it, at this point, you are too new to this to be not looking at your techniques as a possible problem.

Also, make sure you are not babying horse, nor using a "soothing" tone...as in It'sssss allllll rigggghhhhhttttt method of horse handling, that will turn one into a fool very quickly. Horses respond best to quiet, calm commands in no nonsense voice.

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post #26 of 55 Old 09-16-2014, 04:56 PM
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My horse had a bad habit of walking away from the mounting block. I fixed it by this method (when the moving her all around and so on just made us both stressed out):

1. First I had someone hold her, and once I was settled, I gave her a treat from up in the saddle. We did this a few times, with the person helping to keep her still.

2. Then, I got on her myself without someone holding her, and she stayed still long enough for me to get on, but then she started walking before I was ready. I made her stop. As soon as she stopped and stood still for a few seconds, I gave her a treat. This happened a few times. It wasn't perfect, but it was a next step in my mind.

3. Then after a few times of that, when she figured out that once I was up and she was still she got the treat, I made her wait just a little longer each time. If she moved before I was ready, I pulled the reins and said, "Ah!" loudly. Once she stood for a while without moving, she got the treat.

Eventually she figured it all out. She knows now that I need to be up on her and settled before she gets her treat. So now she just waits. And when I don't have a treat (forgot it), I just pet her on the neck and tell her what a good girl she is and we walk off. She's fine with that too. :)
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post #27 of 55 Old 09-16-2014, 10:18 PM
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so many ways to skin a cat!
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post #28 of 55 Old 09-16-2014, 11:11 PM
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Glad you've sorted that out - if it works I don't knock it!!!
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post #29 of 55 Old 09-24-2014, 09:17 AM
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[quote=Cmck;6073066]
Quote:
Originally Posted by beau159 View Post
For the first problem .... how is your horse's ground work? If you are doing nothing but mindlessly circling him around the mounting block, it has become a game to him. You need to make him WORK.
Back up now.
Move the hindquarters away.
Go forward.
Stop.
Move the shoulders away.
Back up.
Go forward.
.......

Nothing is being done mindlessly, I assure you. Ground work is consistent. Lunging before riding. We are thinking about putting in a round pen.
Lunging if not done properly is not considered ground work. It is My guess is that the way you answered that your not doing any ground quality ground work.
That said I think your horses do not like your riding skills if theybarevsuddenly not wanting to be. Mounted.
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post #30 of 55 Old 09-24-2014, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ecasey View Post
My horse had a bad habit of walking away from the mounting block. I fixed it by this method (when the moving her all around and so on just made us both stressed out):

1. First I had someone hold her, and once I was settled, I gave her a treat from up in the saddle. We did this a few times, with the person helping to keep her still.

2. Then, I got on her myself without someone holding her, and she stayed still long enough for me to get on, but then she started walking before I was ready. I made her stop. As soon as she stopped and stood still for a few seconds, I gave her a treat. This happened a few times. It wasn't perfect, but it was a next step in my mind.

3. Then after a few times of that, when she figured out that once I was up and she was still she got the treat, I made her wait just a little longer each time. If she moved before I was ready, I pulled the reins and said, "Ah!" loudly. Once she stood for a while without moving, she got the treat.

Eventually she figured it all out. She knows now that I need to be up on her and settled before she gets her treat. So now she just waits. And when I don't have a treat (forgot it), I just pet her on the neck and tell her what a good girl she is and we walk off. She's fine with that too. :)
I'm not a treat giver and think they should just behave but do agree this can work well. My sis uses this technique and she was at a show heading towards the mounting block and the horse was acting crazy. Several people asked her if they could hold her horse while she mounted. She declined and of course the horse was perfect for the mount so she could get her treat. I would prefer her to be behaved while heading to the block.
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