What is the correct way to get a horse off the ground? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 26 Old 10-11-2015, 08:30 PM Thread Starter
Yearling
 
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What is the correct way to get a horse off the ground?

The OTTB mare I ride for lessons was lying down in her stall, not asleep, just resting. I went into the stall and she didn't show any intention of getting up. She didn't have a halter on, but even if she did I wasn't sure if it's a safe idea to be next to a horse which is getting up, legs flying all over the place. So I got some food and placed it in her bucket which got her up all right. What is considered safe handling in this situation?

Last edited by Horsef; 10-11-2015 at 08:38 PM.
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post #2 of 26 Old 10-11-2015, 09:43 PM
Yearling
 
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I think you handled it well.

You considered safety first and used a surefire way to get her attention, food.
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post #3 of 26 Old 10-11-2015, 10:00 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by gssw5 View Post
I think you handled it well.

You considered safety first and used a surefire way to get her attention, food.
Thank you for the answer :)

I know I should have asked my trainer, but I ask her so many stupid questions already... It's nice having this forum to catch the overflow :)
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post #4 of 26 Old 10-11-2015, 10:19 PM
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If you think your horse would be safe...

Put a halter on with a lead rope attached and ask (by pulling lightly on the lead rope) to get up. Just stay standing toward the door in case the stall is small and you have to get out of the way.
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post #5 of 26 Old 10-11-2015, 10:34 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Kay Armstrong View Post
If you think your horse would be safe...

Put a halter on with a lead rope attached and ask (by pulling lightly on the lead rope) to get up. Just stay standing toward the door in case the stall is small and you have to get out of the way.
I was worried that she would start getting up as I was putting the halter on, but I suppose she isn't jet propelled- I guess I would have enough time to get out of the way.

Where should I stand whe putting the halter on, behind her back or in front of her head? Away from the legs, I assume.
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post #6 of 26 Old 10-11-2015, 10:48 PM
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If you watch a horse get up, the first move they make with their legs is to shove the front ones out in front of them, to push themselves up. So you definitely don't want to be up there at their head. If you HAVE to get close to one that is laying down, the safest spot to be is on the opposite side from where their legs are, but you have to pay attention that they don't go to rolling (they don't usually, but you still need to watch for it).

If I go in a stall to get a horse who is laying down, I'll just keep a safe distance, cluck to them and swing my lead rope. That almost always gets them up. If it doesn't, I'll pop them on the rump with my lead rope. If that doesn't make them get up, it's either a super docile horse, or he's sick.
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post #7 of 26 Old 10-11-2015, 11:20 PM
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I've kicked plenty of horses in the rump to get them up. Stay on the side OPPOSITE the legs and you're generally safest. Usually all it takes is a little nudge with the toe for a healthy horse, but in sick/injured horses or if they've been cast (trapped laying down) and are exhausted I've had to get after a few pretty hard before they'd make a effort.

Obviously those were cases where it was medically important to get them and moving again so they wouldn't suffer further harm or injury. The opposite, keeping a horse from trying to get up, is usually accomplished by sitting on their neck from the mane/back side while they're flat on the ground since they need to get their head up and front legs out in front of them to rise. This can be important when you and a buddy are trying to untangle their legs out of something and don't feel like dying if they attempt to get up suddenly (ropes are your friend).

I like the treat idea though- that's probably the safest way with a healthy horse. I know you'd probably have every horse at my barn up and begging by just crinkling the bag!
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post #8 of 26 Old 10-12-2015, 03:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Sharpie View Post

The opposite, keeping a horse from trying to get up, is usually accomplished by sitting on their neck from the mane/back side while they're flat on the ground since they need to get their head up and front legs out in front of them to rise. This can be important when you and a buddy are trying to untangle their legs out of something and don't feel like dying if they attempt to get up suddenly (ropes are your friend).
This is true, although speaking from bad personal experiences, if the horse wants to get up badly enough, they can easily use enough force to knock you off them. I've been rolled over to where I was right under the front of one getting up... not a good spot.
If you need to keep a horse down, you have to get something on their head, even if it's just a rope securely around the nose. Stand yourself on the side opposite the legs, behind the horse's rump and pull the horse's nose back toward his hip. They cannot get up with their head like that, no matter how hard they try. You don't have to hold their head there, you just pull it there as soon as they try to get up. Obviously, you can also hobble legs together to keep a horse from being able to get up, but you're likely going to need control of his head in order to get legs hobbled.
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post #9 of 26 Old 10-12-2015, 05:51 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by enh817 View Post
If you watch a horse get up, the first move they make with their legs is to shove the front ones out in front of them, to push themselves up. So you definitely don't want to be up there at their head. If you HAVE to get close to one that is laying down, the safest spot to be is on the opposite side from where their legs are, but you have to pay attention that they don't go to rolling (they don't usually, but you still need to watch for it).

If I go in a stall to get a horse who is laying down, I'll just keep a safe distance, cluck to them and swing my lead rope. That almost always gets them up. If it doesn't, I'll pop them on the rump with my lead rope. If that doesn't make them get up, it's either a super docile horse, or he's sick.
Thank you, I'll try it next time.
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post #10 of 26 Old 10-12-2015, 07:30 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by enh817 View Post
This is true, although speaking from bad personal experiences, if the horse wants to get up badly enough, they can easily use enough force to knock you off them. I've been rolled over to where I was right under the front of one getting up... not a good spot.
If you need to keep a horse down, you have to get something on their head, even if it's just a rope securely around the nose. Stand yourself on the side opposite the legs, behind the horse's rump and pull the horse's nose back toward his hip. They cannot get up with their head like that, no matter how hard they try. You don't have to hold their head there, you just pull it there as soon as they try to get up. Obviously, you can also hobble legs together to keep a horse from being able to get up, but you're likely going to need control of his head in order to get legs hobbled.
I remember a clip of a rider who got her leg trapped under her horse after a fall and used this technique to prevent it from making more damage before help arrived. Great presence of mind and it worked well.
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