what do you think of my horse? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 123Likes
Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 41 Old 08-09-2017, 05:32 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,930
• Horses: 2
Pretty horse.

I am guessing that what the horse has experienced and will experience are very different than what most of us on the forum here know. Based on the photos I am guessing this horse is in a middle eastern country, and for example, most small Arabs there carry full grown men. Also the training traditions and use of the horses are very different. So what advice is given here might not work out depending on what resources you have to work with.

From the photos, the horse's hip bones and croup are visible which is either a sign of not enough good food/vitamins or muscle wasting for some reason. So I'd suggest doing your best to check to make sure the horse is sound and also has adequate feed. I am not sure what is available to feed horses in that part of the world.
gottatrot is offline  
post #12 of 41 Old 08-09-2017, 06:52 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 37,004
• Horses: 0
@gottatrot You mentioned food - I actually know, that for the rich, there is excellent quality hay from northern Europe, including Latvia (found out 2 years ago why we sometimes have shortage of really good hay - there is a company that buys it in, repackages and sails it off to the UAE.. but that is off the point here..


I am happy when people want to get to know horses and so on, but this horse is no way a horse for a beginner. It needs retraining, some rehab time, better looking feet, her legs worry me a little. That rider is awful on her - her mouth never got release. (here guys is the point were heavy handed dressage riders snap a noseband on, crank it real tight and ride, so we don't see this mouth gaping!)

I hope you get her checked out, fed a little more and get a better trainer to work with you both, and I, of course, agree with everyone saying that you should learn on an older horse.. :) Good luck!
Cherrij is offline  
post #13 of 41 Old 08-09-2017, 08:47 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines
Posts: 2,173
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
Pretty horse.

I am guessing that what the horse has experienced and will experience are very different than what most of us on the forum here know. Based on the photos I am guessing this horse is in a middle eastern country, and for example, most small Arabs there carry full grown men. Also the training traditions and use of the horses are very different. So what advice is given here might not work out depending on what resources you have to work with.

From the photos, the horse's hip bones and croup are visible which is either a sign of not enough good food/vitamins or muscle wasting for some reason. So I'd suggest doing your best to check to make sure the horse is sound and also has adequate feed. I am not sure what is available to feed horses in that part of the world.
Very true. Horseflesh and horse handling vary greatly in different parts of the world. Osama has had a wonderful gift and opportunity presented to him. I hope he stays safe and shares his adventure with us.

for all our warnings about beginners and young horses I recall that I learned to ride as a 6 year old on a 2 year old, green broke pony. Just the way things were done in that time and place, and are still done in many places.
loosie, anndankev and bsms like this.
Cordillera Cowboy is offline  
post #14 of 41 Old 08-09-2017, 02:37 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 80
• Horses: 0
I don't care what part of the world you are in, respect and kindness toward animals is a pretty low bar for common decency. No one should hang on a horses mouth like that. That poor hose :(
loosie and Whinnie like this.
SamanthaApp is offline  
post #15 of 41 Old 08-09-2017, 03:05 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Uk
Posts: 477
• Horses: 1
She is a lovely looking horse...but...if you have limited knowledge about horses and cannot ride an arab is not the horse to learn on.
i have to agree that vid is shocking,he is way way too big for her and there is absolutely no reason for him to be pulling so hard on her mouth,you are setting yourself up for a mighty big fall and serious injury if this is the way your horse is being ridden, as bad habits die hard and she is going to learn many from this rider.
this is how horses end up un- ridable as they become so dangerous, and i certainly would not have picked this breed OR age horse for my friend if they could not ride.
arabs are at best a hot headed breed,they need expert handling and riding..don't get me wrong i have seen some amazing and well behaved arabs but more often than not people buy them for their beauty and showmanship but you have to know what you are doing with them in the first place.
sorry but thats just my opinion
Chaz80 is offline  
post #16 of 41 Old 08-09-2017, 03:12 PM
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 33
• Horses: 0
Wow on the vid also. I kept waiting for him to release bit pressure. But it never came. That horse was not happy.
255954 is offline  
post #17 of 41 Old 08-09-2017, 03:16 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 15,433
• Horses: 2
The Op hasn't returned since the day they made the thread, not sur what to make of it all.
updownrider and Chaz80 like this.

“Never attribute to malice that which can be attributed to stupidity”
Golden Horse is offline  
post #18 of 41 Old 08-10-2017, 01:44 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,930
• Horses: 2
I agree with everyone about the horse needing humane treatment, people who understand and are qualified to ride and care properly for horses, and correct training.

And this is not to argue, or say this is OK with my beliefs, it is just a statement. Arabians came from that part of the world, were ridden and used in ways that we would consider inhumane and yet these were the people who developed the breed, used the horses in these ways, and continue to have and use these horses. The people who are handling the horse and riding the horse are most likely quite used to horses with this temperament, and this is just the way they handle them because they don't know anything different. I've seen quite a few videos online made by people in the middle east riding Arabs and they often are prancing around, quite uncomfortable, the bit is held in a vice grip and you'd swear the rider was going to fall off.

When I was in Iceland, I visited a museum. We know the little Icelandic horses are extremely tough, hardy and have temperaments that will put up with almost anything. I was appalled to see the old historical photographs that showed how these horses were developed to be this way. They were used so harshly and made to do such things that only the toughest horses with the most steady temperaments would have made it through. They piled their backs high with heavy items, strapped them together and made them toil through the ice and snow on very little food. As they said, "Iceland was built on the back of a horse."

Arabians are also a very tough breed, and I suspect both their hardiness and temperaments were shaped by the whims of the people who bred them in the middle east.
gottatrot is offline  
post #19 of 41 Old 08-10-2017, 08:39 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines
Posts: 2,173
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamanthaApp View Post
I don't care what part of the world you are in, respect and kindness toward animals is a pretty low bar for common decency. No one should hang on a horses mouth like that. That poor hose :(
It would seem so. But if you dig deeper, you’ll find that it is not, nor has it always been so. . Of course, there have always been people who have treated their animals with respect and kindness. However, the concept of humane treatment of working animals among the general population of Europe and North America is relatively new, just over 100 years. The book, Black Beauty, and the companion piece about a dog, Beautiful Joe, were written in the late 1890’s. Both gave voice to the new movement for humane treatment for all animals. Took a while to gain traction, but it is now considered the norm in Europe and North America.

Elite horsemen the world over have understood the importance of a light hand on the reins. I’ll use the long process of training a “bridle horse” among the vaquero tradition as an example. But you don’t have to get very far removed from that elite tradition to find places and people for whom heavy handed machismo and dominance are still the norm. It is the same in many, many places.

As a beginner, Osama will have no standing if he tries to tell the folks working his new horse how to do it. We will not change the horse culture in the place where this horse is kept. Rather than criticize the size of the horse and rider, and the methods used by the folks handling his horse, I would advise Osama differently. Perhaps it could be possible to take a lesson or two in whatever country he is in now, before returning home to see his new horse. Perhaps there, he can be exposed to the concept of light handed rein handling. Whether or not it will work on horses trained in a different manner will have to be seen.

Hope that helps some.
Cordillera Cowboy is offline  
post #20 of 41 Old 08-10-2017, 03:00 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 80
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cordillera Cowboy View Post
It would seem so. But if you dig deeper, you’ll find that it is not, nor has it always been so. . Of course, there have always been people who have treated their animals with respect and kindness. However, the concept of humane treatment of working animals among the general population of Europe and North America is relatively new, just over 100 years. The book, Black Beauty, and the companion piece about a dog, Beautiful Joe, were written in the late 1890’s. Both gave voice to the new movement for humane treatment for all animals. Took a while to gain traction, but it is now considered the norm in Europe and North America.

Elite horsemen the world over have understood the importance of a light hand on the reins. I’ll use the long process of training a “bridle horse” among the vaquero tradition as an example. But you don’t have to get very far removed from that elite tradition to find places and people for whom heavy handed machismo and dominance are still the norm. It is the same in many, many places.

As a beginner, Osama will have no standing if he tries to tell the folks working his new horse how to do it. We will not change the horse culture in the place where this horse is kept. Rather than criticize the size of the horse and rider, and the methods used by the folks handling his horse, I would advise Osama differently. Perhaps it could be possible to take a lesson or two in whatever country he is in now, before returning home to see his new horse. Perhaps there, he can be exposed to the concept of light handed rein handling. Whether or not it will work on horses trained in a different manner will have to be seen.

Hope that helps some.
So some places in the world are 100 years behind Europe and North America in their treatment of animals, yah that's not news. Doesn't make it right.

I have no interest in trying to understand people that don't respect animals. I will never like them and never want to be around them. They are not my kind of people and honestly don't deserve my time, attention, or respect. I feel bad for the poor animals that are subjected to interactions with them.

Last edited by loosie; 08-19-2017 at 09:07 PM.
SamanthaApp is offline  
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome