What do you think of this starter pony? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
 39Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 35 Old 01-18-2016, 06:10 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: New Brunswick Canada
Posts: 2,233
• Horses: 1
I got my first pony at four. He was a pity case my dad picked up. He was a half dead two year old stud who was unhandled. He threw me on and let me go. So, if this isn't your first or only horse, I say go for it- you can't get any better than that. If it's your first horse or only horse i suggest buying a broke older horse who she can grow into, so you don't have to sell down the road when she grows out of her.
knightrider and Jan1975 like this.
WhattaTroublemaker is offline  
post #22 of 35 Old 01-18-2016, 06:36 AM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,246
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whinnie View Post
I think you said one of the geldings is pretty laid back. Could you "pony" the pony while riding the gelding?
Yes, one of our geldings, probably both, really, would be fine with "ponying" the pony.

Quote:
Originally Posted by knightrider View Post
My friend bought a pony for her 5 year old, and when she had the vet check, there was a history of laminitis. The vet told her, "There are two kinds of ponies: those that have foundered and those that will founder."
That's interesting! When I was a kid we had a pony, and I remember we couldn't leave her out in the pasture 24/7 for worry of foundering. I didn't think/know much about it at the time because I was a kid and it wasn't my problem (oh those were the days). I wonder why ponies are at such risk. Little gluttons maybe.



I talked to the BO, and she said she currently doesn't have room for a pony, as she would want it to be in a separate paddock. However, she does have several dry paddocks w/ walk-in shelters that would be perfect for a pony. She's looking to sell several horses over the next few months, and there'd probably be room then.
knightrider likes this.
Jan1975 is offline  
post #23 of 35 Old 01-18-2016, 06:48 AM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,246
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by knightrider View Post
My friend bought a pony for her 5 year old, and when she had the vet check, there was a history of laminitis. The vet told her, "There are two kinds of ponies: those that have foundered and those that will founder." She went ahead and bought the pony and never had a moment's problem with her. Of course, she was very careful and took good care of the pony.

I bought my daughter a large pony that I could ride when my daughter was 3. I mostly rode the pony until she was 5 and could ride on her own. My daughter was not all that interested in horses, but rode with me because it was something fun to do with Mom. My daughter is 13 now, just finished starting her own filly that we got when the filly was 4 months old. She is a beautiful rider and handles the young filly perfectly. She still isn't all that interested in horses, but she has a great time riding with her friends. Horses gave her a lot of confidence. Just because she doesn't have the passion I have did not mean that having a pony, and now a horse, did not help her quite a lot.

I would have the vet check the seriousness of the laminitis, but not rule the pony out. And, in my opinion, kids don't need to have the total passion for horses to still benefit from having one. By the way, we call our pony The World's Greatest Pony. He is marvelous.
Is your pony for sale? I also had the world's greatest pony when I was a kid.

Glad to hear that your daughter doesn't have the passion but still enjoys horses. Neither of my kids have the horse obsession that I had as a kid (still have, really). My son is more into it now, but it's just one of his many interests, and he'll commonly skip going to the barn with me to hang out with friends, etc. However, when he does go to the barn, he loves being with all of the horses.

My daughter, honestly, prefers the barn cats. She does like riding, but doesn't ask to ride every time. I think something more her size may be more fun. She can literally walk under our 2 geldings. She doesn't of course, but they are just so BIG to her. I do think our summer days, since I'm a teacher and will be home, will be filled with time at the barn and riding. It would be nice if she could participate.
knightrider likes this.
Jan1975 is offline  
post #24 of 35 Old 01-18-2016, 09:14 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Hildreth, FL
Posts: 2,838
• Horses: 5
Nah, thanks for asking, but we'll never sell our pony Tico. He's given us 100% with all his heart and he'll have a home with us forever.

My daughter also prefers cats to horses. Luckily I found riding friends for both my son and daughter and they both like to ride with their friends rather than ride with me. But they are both good riders, and it can't help but do them good to have horses.
Jan1975 likes this.
knightrider is offline  
post #25 of 35 Old 01-18-2016, 09:56 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: California
Posts: 687
• Horses: 2
I'd think if you were planning to pony your daughter off one of the other horses, or go riding together as a group, you'd be better off looking for a pony of 11-12 hands as opposed to this pony which isn't quite 10 hands.

If you were just leadlining and planning to drive, she'd probably be really suitable, but her size being around "bigger" horses could be a problem because she's short enough that if your daughter inadvertently rode up behind a bigger horse, and someone kicked out, it puts your daughter in a perfect spot to get kicked. With an 11-12 hand small, that at least puts your daughter's upper body higher than the other horse's hip.

Good luck!
Acadianartist and Jan1975 like this.
CaliforniaDreaming is offline  
post #26 of 35 Old 01-18-2016, 10:11 AM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,246
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaDreaming View Post
I'd think if you were planning to pony your daughter off one of the other horses, or go riding together as a group, you'd be better off looking for a pony of 11-12 hands as opposed to this pony which isn't quite 10 hands.

If you were just leadlining and planning to drive, she'd probably be really suitable, but her size being around "bigger" horses could be a problem because she's short enough that if your daughter inadvertently rode up behind a bigger horse, and someone kicked out, it puts your daughter in a perfect spot to get kicked. With an 11-12 hand small, that at least puts your daughter's upper body higher than the other horse's hip.

Good luck!
Definitely something to think about, thanks!
Jan1975 is offline  
post #27 of 35 Old 01-18-2016, 11:27 AM
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: CT USA an English transplant
Posts: 34,823
• Horses: 3
Laminitis is really common in ponies especially if they've got native British pony blood in them, it seems to be a genetic thing. A vet will likely advice X rays of those feet to see what's going on in them and that's what I would advise too.
People make the mistake of thinking they can turn these little one's out 24/7 because its close to natural for them but in truth its the worst thing you can do, they need very careful management with some form of restricted grazing
I would also have the pony checked for IR and Cushings
Other than that I agree with the member who said to be sure its good the catch, groom etc and you need to know that its been properly trained to ride off the lead and not just follow a human or another horse
Jan1975 likes this.
jaydee is offline  
post #28 of 35 Old 01-18-2016, 02:28 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,218
• Horses: 2
The Shetland islands in particular have a harsh climate where it is difficult for plants to grow. Ponies living there had to subsist on scarce food. Similar to Welsh ponies, which came from Wales which also has a harsh environment. Many of our ponies come from these bloodlines. What we call insulin resistance was necessary for them to survive. Many mustangs have also developed this ability to survive through periods of drought.

We just need to feed these horses as they've developed genetically rather than like the Thoroughbreds we've created from many generations born on rich Kentucky pastureland.
gottatrot is offline  
post #29 of 35 Old 01-18-2016, 05:20 PM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,246
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot View Post
The Shetland islands in particular have a harsh climate where it is difficult for plants to grow. Ponies living there had to subsist on scarce food. Similar to Welsh ponies, which came from Wales which also has a harsh environment. Many of our ponies come from these bloodlines. What we call insulin resistance was necessary for them to survive. Many mustangs have also developed this ability to survive through periods of drought.

We just need to feed these horses as they've developed genetically rather than like the Thoroughbreds we've created from many generations born on rich Kentucky pastureland.
That is really interesting!
Jan1975 is offline  
post #30 of 35 Old 01-22-2016, 09:04 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 373
• Horses: 0
If you won't be able to school the pony, do you have a small (tiny! for a pony that size), competent rider available to do it for you?

Driving and ponying would be great exercise for the pony, but wouldn't address all the potential training issues that could arise from being ridden by a very young beginner all the time. Personally, I wouldn't buy a pony for a beginner child that I couldn't school myself or easily find a "pony jockey" type kid to school for me if necessary.
Jan1975 likes this.
BearPony is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Starter Horse Trials in MD/VA/PA Juliad Horse Shows 0 07-13-2014 05:38 PM
Need starter advice on new horses MySilver New to Horses 26 01-06-2014 10:47 AM
14 yr old starter mare.. KCC587 Barrel Racing 5 07-17-2011 08:30 AM
What would be a good starter breed for me? for the love of a horse Horse Breeds 15 04-13-2011 04:25 PM
Is this a decent starter saddle? Indyhorse Horse Tack and Equipment 17 03-22-2010 03:10 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome