What does "honesty" mean when used in reference to a horse? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 35 Old 10-17-2016, 09:09 PM
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Okay, so to all that replied, what's the difference between an honest horse and a push-button horse?
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post #12 of 35 Old 10-17-2016, 09:50 PM
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In my opinion an "honest horse" is one that does something when cued if they know how to do it. They don't cheat or need much reinforcement.

By that definition there aren't many out there.

I think most horses are honest to a degree. They try to do what you are asking as long as they understand what you are asking and you seem like you know what you are doing and want.
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post #13 of 35 Old 10-17-2016, 09:54 PM
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Push button and honest are close but not the same. You can have a green bean who tries really hard and is very honest, but is no where push button. Or you could have a grouchy old lesson horse who is push button but will dump a kid at a fence if they even think about looking down.
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post #14 of 35 Old 10-17-2016, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Horsef View Post
Thank you all, I think my mare firmly classifies as dishonest :) Ah, well, at least she's safe :)
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post #15 of 35 Old 10-17-2016, 10:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
Push button and honest are close but not the same. You can have a green bean who tries really hard and is very honest, but is no where push button. Or you could have a grouchy old lesson horse who is push button but will dump a kid at a fence if they even think about looking down.
This. I trust my green Arab more then anything because his goal in life is 100% to please his people (me). For example, the other day he stepped out of his stall (which he used to know not to do, my mother started letting him) and I got mad and shouted at him not thinking about it. When I went into his stall he flinched away from me and stood in the corner with his eyes bugging out. I genuinely scared him and hurt his feelings (I felt awful). Had I been more focused and not just in "horse mode" I would have thought "hey it's Desi, all I need to do is say "back"" and he would have moved instantly. Our pony is well trained and bombproof, she is honest, what you see is what you get. The MFT err... I'm not sure I'd classify him as "dishonest" but he has major issues, he's definitely not trustworthy, but I don't think it's anything about you, I think of dishonest as taking advantage of.

My friend was riding a well trained horse who bucked with the intention of getting her off, she stuck it and got her balance and pulled herself up then went to ask him to stop (he was bolting). She was still in a compromised position and he bucked again and threw her. Absolutely no reason aside from wanting her off. That is a dishonest (and dangerous) horse.

I must say it's not a term I use much.
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post #16 of 35 Old 10-17-2016, 11:36 PM
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To me an honest horse is one who always lets you know where you stand. They don’t ride with you for thirty minutes acting like everything is hunky-dory and then suddenly blow their wig.

An honest horse will clue you in when they aren’t much liking what you are doing, the way you are riding or whatever; think slow release steam valve.

A dishonest horse holds it all in until BLAM! Taking you totally by surprise and picking leaves out of your hair as you watch old paint gallop off into the sunset!

By that definition honest and push-button are unrelated.

“You spend your whole life with horses and just about the time you think you have them figured out, a horse comes along that tells you otherwise.” –quote from my very wizened trainer


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post #17 of 35 Old 10-18-2016, 12:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reiningcatsanddogs View Post
To me an honest horse is one who always lets you know where you stand. They don’t ride with you for thirty minutes acting like everything is hunky-dory and then suddenly blow their wig.

An honest horse will clue you in when they aren’t much liking what you are doing, the way you are riding or whatever; think slow release steam valve.

A dishonest horse holds it all in until BLAM! Taking you totally by surprise and picking leaves out of your hair as you watch old paint gallop off into the sunset!

By that definition honest and push-button are unrelated.
This is how I would define it.
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post #18 of 35 Old 10-18-2016, 03:42 AM
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I have had several honest horses. One a cobby 14.2 was brilliant with nervous or beginner riders. I used him for Riding for the Disabled and he would do all he could to help his riders. However, he did have the most wicked sense of humour and if he had a rider who thought they knew more than they did he could drop them in an instant.

Possibly the most honest was a grey mare around 15.3 she had the done that been there T shirt. One day I was ponying her off a racehorse. We were very limited as to where we could ride at the time and a couple of miles from home the lane was blocked by a car accident. To get past I rode my horse up a bank into the trees, wound our way around and had to slide down the bank onto the lane. My horse didn't have a clue as to how to go down the back, he dithered at the top frightened to put one foot in front of the other. After several minutes of this the mare pushed past him and walked down the slope giving him a lead. I had to flick her rope over her neck as it was impossible to hold her. She stopped in the lane and just stood there waiting for my horse to follow, blocking any possibility of him jumping down. He finally crept down the bank, I took the rope off her neck and we went on our merry way.

When a friends daughter's pony went lame just before she was to take some Pony Club test I lent them the mare. She looked like a pimple on an elephants butt. We hacked to where the test was taking palace and she turned off into the field, that mare never hesitated about leaving her stable companions. The girl passed her test with flying colours.

I never knew that mare do anything wrong with the exception of one day slipping out of her stable and charging across the immaculate lawn with the ancient gardener running, yelling and shouting and waving his arms at her to stop her going across the top lawn!
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post #19 of 35 Old 10-18-2016, 03:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reiningcatsanddogs View Post
To me an honest horse is one who always lets you know where you stand. They don’t ride with you for thirty minutes acting like everything is hunky-dory and then suddenly blow their wig.
Oh, I love your definition, I'll take it. Makes my mare honest :)

She is always gate sour, not just sometimes.
She never wants to canter without mr Whippy. She knows what I want, snorts and picks up pace but she doesn't want to do it.
She never blows up.
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post #20 of 35 Old 10-18-2016, 07:41 AM
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Honesty has nothing to do with obedience. An honest horse may tell you, "Why should I trot? We're just going in endless circles and I see no point to it!" We then use Mr Whippy to tell the horse we were not really asking in the first place - Ask, Tell, Demand - and call the horse dishonest.

Meanwhile, the horse learns not to talk, because his rider won't listen and punishes him for talking too much. Then, when the horse is desperate enough, he yells - and we call him dishonest because he didn't whisper first.

"In place of first putting the blame on the horse, which is only natural,the rider ought perhaps begin by trying to find out if he himself is not the culprit." - James Fillis 1890
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