What kind of budget should I have for a potential horse? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 36 Old 06-27-2015, 09:10 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Roman View Post
That is a TON of stuff! I bet you could save a lot of money crossing several of those things off your list. I have one horse and I just have: a body brush, a sweat scraper/shedding blade, hoof pick, plastic curry comb, and fly spray. Unless you plan on showing or your horse needs this stuff, I wouldn't buy show sheen, detangler, hoof oil, etc. I would just buy a hard brush, a soft brush, a curry comb, a mane and tail comb, a sweat scraper/shedding blade, a face brush, hoof pick, and fly spray. You could get by with one tote and don't need a lot of bathing stuff either, unless you do plan on showing. I've had my horse for almost 5 years and haven't used shampoo or conditioner on him, just hose him down (if I can, bath time is actually run around me in a circle time).



This is a good list here, but I wouldn't go buy all this stuff (except for water buckets, feed pan, grass, and some regular brome/timothy/etc. hay) before buying him. Because you won't know if he does need oats and alfalfa, or what kind of treats or supplements he may need.



What I've marked with '*' you may not need, or may not need all of it. You could get by without a leadrope with a chain. You'll only need one lead rope, you can easily go buy one if something happens to your current one. I still have the same lead rope and still use it that I bought 5 years ago.

And you certainly don't need 5 saddle pads!! Just get one or two for right now. Your horse may not need blankets either. I have never put a blanket on my horse, though I am thinking of buying him a fly sheet if he ever needs it. I wouldn't buy blankets unless the horse is used to wearing one or needs one. And don't buy a bit before the horse, there are lots of bits and who knows what kind of bit the horse will go well in.

What I have marked in '**', I am wondering what they are. What is a Riser and a Bump pad?



My guess on prices...

Halter: $10-$30
Bridle: $20-$50
Lead Rope: $10
Bit: $20-$100
Reins: $20-$60
Saddle: $500-$1500

You can buy a grooming set online, comes with a tote and different brushes. Everything varies. You can look online and get a good idea of the average price for certain stuff.
A bumper bad is another word for a saddle pad and a rider helps relieve pressure on a horses back. And thanks so much for help! I was wondering if I needed all of this! I'm not showing so it's great to know that I can cross some of this off my list! I appreciate it!
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post #12 of 36 Old 06-27-2015, 09:38 PM
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Your parents are correct in that horses are very expensive to keep. The biggest expenses I have are board and lessons. You don't say where you plan to keep this horse, but with it being your first horse and your parents not being very horse-y, I'd plan on boarding even if you technically could keep the horse at home. You should also keep in mind that horses are herd animals and often don't do well alone, so keeping a horse at home very quickly turns into keeping two horses at home. Even if you're not planning on showing, I'd plan on taking regular lessons, at least at the beginning so you can work out your horse's quirks (and they all have their quirks!) with the help of a professional.

The list you have is pretty long, and there are a lot of things you can cut out from it (Especially multiples of grooming items... what are you going to do with four face brushes?)

Instead of budgeting for things like riser pads separately, I'd set a total budget (perhaps $2000) for the saddle, to include the services of a qualified saddle fitter, re-flocking, and any corrective pads you may need in addition to the saddle itself. There's a whole world of behavioral issues you can avoid by making sure your horse's saddle is comfortable and fits well.

Hay and feed vary a lot depending on the horse and if you're boarding or not. Many boarding facilities include hay and grain, though it's less common to include supplements. If your horse needs joint supplements, for example, they can be pretty pricey. If you have to provide your own grain, keep in mind that a hard keeper will be significantly more expensive to feed than an easy keeper. You won't know until you start looking at specific horses. It may very well make sense to pass on an otherwise good horse if it's going to be prohibitively expensive to feed it.

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post #13 of 36 Old 06-27-2015, 10:02 PM
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How much it will cost YOU to keep a horse will vary widely depending on where you live, whether you will board or keep at home, how much hay costs in your area, what kind of board you will need (self-care? Pasture board? Full stall board?), how many lessons a month you will be taking, what the horse will be eating, whether he is shod or barefoot and how healthy the whole animal is including his feet. How much is a barefoot trim in your area? How much are a set of shoes?

I have had my mare for 15 years and have had to call the vet for "emergency" for her maybe four times not including maintenance like dental care, vaccinations, Coggins testing, health certs.

On the other hand I had had a young filly for two weeks when she managed to puncture her hock and needed immediate, $1500 surgery that maybe would maybe wouldn't keep her sound for riding later on.

My point is you cannot count on how much you will spend in vet bills. But guaranteed, you will.

I live in Michigan, USA, and keep two horses at home for about $280 a month including hay for winter, which is running about $5 a small square bale right now. Going to need to get supplemental hay for summer though, as my pasture is too small and too poor to support two horses full-time. I also do most of my own trimming but only because I have good professional support and have been studying for several years.

I spent several thousand dollars setting up fences (did all the work myself), building shelters for them and purchasing a trailer. If you have a trailer you must also have a vehicle sturdy enough to pull it. If you do not have a trailer you must be prepared with a friend with a trailer to haul your horse in emergencies.

If you keep a horse at home you must also have a plan for disposing of the manure and good knowledge of pasture management if you have pasture. How will you get water to your horse? How will you see at night if you have an emergency or late feeding? How will you keep buckets of water free from ice in the winter if you are in northern climates?

There is much to consider, so there is no easy or simple answer to how much it costs to keep a horse. When I boarded I had full stall board (only board available at the time) and paid $400 a month. That did not include vet, deworming, grooming, hoof care or lessons/training. And it was rural Illinois and not even near any professional or show barns where people spend a lot more money to board their horses.
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post #14 of 36 Old 06-27-2015, 10:27 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by verona1016 View Post
Your parents are correct in that horses are very expensive to keep. The biggest expenses I have are board and lessons. You don't say where you plan to keep this horse, but with it being your first horse and your parents not being very horse-y, I'd plan on boarding even if you technically could keep the horse at home. You should also keep in mind that horses are herd animals and often don't do well alone, so keeping a horse at home very quickly turns into keeping two horses at home. Even if you're not planning on showing, I'd plan on taking regular lessons, at least at the beginning so you can work out your horse's quirks (and they all have their quirks!) with the help of a professional.

The list you have is pretty long, and there are a lot of things you can cut out from it (Especially multiples of grooming items... what are you going to do with four face brushes?)

Instead of budgeting for things like riser pads separately, I'd set a total budget (perhaps $2000) for the saddle, to include the services of a qualified saddle fitter, re-flocking, and any corrective pads you may need in addition to the saddle itself. There's a whole world of behavioral issues you can avoid by making sure your horse's saddle is comfortable and fits well.

Hay and feed vary a lot depending on the horse and if you're boarding or not. Many boarding facilities include hay and grain, though it's less common to include supplements. If your horse needs joint supplements, for example, they can be pretty pricey. If you have to provide your own grain, keep in mind that a hard keeper will be significantly more expensive to feed than an easy keeper. You won't know until you start looking at specific horses. It may very well make sense to pass on an otherwise good horse if it's going to be prohibitively expensive to feed it.
Thanks for the advice! I got this list from a book so I to be quite honest I don't know why I'd need 4 face brushes! Thanks for clearing that up! And my parents are more on board with boarding it but if we move to a horse property (we're moving very soon) my parents would be willing to let me have a horse there eventually. They want me to board first but my riding instructor said that if I kept the horse on my property and there was an extra stall she would board her horse at my place and teach me how to care for a horse more deeply.
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post #15 of 36 Old 06-27-2015, 10:30 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by greenhaven View Post
How much it will cost YOU to keep a horse will vary widely depending on where you live, whether you will board or keep at home, how much hay costs in your area, what kind of board you will need (self-care? Pasture board? Full stall board?), how many lessons a month you will be taking, what the horse will be eating, whether he is shod or barefoot and how healthy the whole animal is including his feet. How much is a barefoot trim in your area? How much are a set of shoes?

I have had my mare for 15 years and have had to call the vet for "emergency" for her maybe four times not including maintenance like dental care, vaccinations, Coggins testing, health certs.

On the other hand I had had a young filly for two weeks when she managed to puncture her hock and needed immediate, $1500 surgery that maybe would maybe wouldn't keep her sound for riding later on.

My point is you cannot count on how much you will spend in vet bills. But guaranteed, you will.

I live in Michigan, USA, and keep two horses at home for about $280 a month including hay for winter, which is running about $5 a small square bale right now. Going to need to get supplemental hay for summer though, as my pasture is too small and too poor to support two horses full-time. I also do most of my own trimming but only because I have good professional support and have been studying for several years.

I spent several thousand dollars setting up fences (did all the work myself), building shelters for them and purchasing a trailer. If you have a trailer you must also have a vehicle sturdy enough to pull it. If you do not have a trailer you must be prepared with a friend with a trailer to haul your horse in emergencies.

If you keep a horse at home you must also have a plan for disposing of the manure and good knowledge of pasture management if you have pasture. How will you get water to your horse? How will you see at night if you have an emergency or late feeding? How will you keep buckets of water free from ice in the winter if you are in northern climates?

There is much to consider, so there is no easy or simple answer to how much it costs to keep a horse. When I boarded I had full stall board (only board available at the time) and paid $400 a month. That did not include vet, deworming, grooming, hoof care or lessons/training. And it was rural Illinois and not even near any professional or show barns where people spend a lot more money to board their horses.
Thanks for the help! I'll definitely keep all of This in mind!
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post #16 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 12:01 AM
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I forgot to add earlier that in my neck of the woods it's about $8,000 to $10,000 a year per horse without showing or lessons. That's roughly $667-$834 per month. But I budget for possible supplements and set aside $50 per month into an emergency fund as well.

I ran some numbers from the websites I listed and this is what I came up using an abbreviated list of the 'essentials'.

1. Horsewear & Training: $ 49.00 Total. Halter $25, 2 Lead ropes $5 ea, Lunge line $14

2. Stable equipment: $ 127.00 Total. Saddlestand $23.00, 2 Water buckets $8 ea, Feed pan $9, Hay net $8, muck fork $20.00, First aid kit $51.00

3. Grooming kit: $ 47.18 Total. Fly spray $14, Hard brush $4, Soft brush $4, Face brush $4, Rubber curry $2, Sponges $1 ea (x2), Sweat Scraper $3, Tote $9, Hoof pick $1.59 ea (x2), mane and tail brush $2.

Total= $223.18 (without taxes added.) This does not include tack since you would need to wait and get that last, however I would budget around $2500 for all of it. (Saddle, girth, pads (irons and stirrups if English), bridle, bit, and reins.)

For vet and farrier I'd set aside another $2,000.00 per year.

If you will be keeping the horse at your home then you'll have to worry about hay, grain/ hard feed, bedding and other associated costs. If you will be boarding then you'll have to factor in if they cover that stuff.

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post #17 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 04:50 AM
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The upfront costs, such as buying gear and a horse are the easiest ones. They can be estimated, budgeted for and bought as a mostly one off purchase.

The expense comes from the upkeep of the horse, both the everyday and emergency care, not to mention the sheer cost of time spent, even travels costs. It all adds up.

Generally gear costs should total under $2000 with at least half of that usually spent on saddlery and mounts. Choosing cheaper secondhand options can bring this down. Be aware that while the grooming and first aid gear can be bought prior to the horse, the other things should only be purchased after a suitable horse is found.

A six piece grooming kit (curry, dandy, body, comb, hoof pick and scraper) will be adequate, polo wraps aren't necessary, for a first horse leg protection (if required) brushing boots are good. Worry about shampoo etc later. Same with lunge gear, breast plate, spare lead ropes, girth cover etc. Two halters and leads are good to have - you only need one of everything else.

As far as monthly costs, this is something you should sit down with your parents and discuss. Talk about where you would keep your horse, how often you would see it etc. Then call up to get board quotes, farrier quotes, vet quotes, and feed quotes if required. Asking online is only the broadest of guides, the monthly price could vary from $100 a month to $1000 a month depending on different areas and ideas of care.
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post #18 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 10:10 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Horseychick87 View Post
I forgot to add earlier that in my neck of the woods it's about $8,000 to $10,000 a year per horse without showing or lessons. That's roughly $667-$834 per month. But I budget for possible supplements and set aside $50 per month into an emergency fund as well.

I ran some numbers from the websites I listed and this is what I came up using an abbreviated list of the 'essentials'.

1. Horsewear & Training: $ 49.00 Total. Halter $25, 2 Lead ropes $5 ea, Lunge line $14

2. Stable equipment: $ 127.00 Total. Saddlestand $23.00, 2 Water buckets $8 ea, Feed pan $9, Hay net $8, muck fork $20.00, First aid kit $51.00

3. Grooming kit: $ 47.18 Total. Fly spray $14, Hard brush $4, Soft brush $4, Face brush $4, Rubber curry $2, Sponges $1 ea (x2), Sweat Scraper $3, Tote $9, Hoof pick $1.59 ea (x2), mane and tail brush $2.

Total= $223.18 (without taxes added.) This does not include tack since you would need to wait and get that last, however I would budget around $2500 for all of it. (Saddle, girth, pads (irons and stirrups if English), bridle, bit, and reins.)

For vet and farrier I'd set aside another $2,000.00 per year.

If you will be keeping the horse at your home then you'll have to worry about hay, grain/ hard feed, bedding and other associated costs. If you will be boarding then you'll have to factor in if they cover that stuff.

Thanks for the info! I really appreciate you taking All this time to help me and give me some budgets!
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post #19 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 10:11 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Saskia View Post
The upfront costs, such as buying gear and a horse are the easiest ones. They can be estimated, budgeted for and bought as a mostly one off purchase.

The expense comes from the upkeep of the horse, both the everyday and emergency care, not to mention the sheer cost of time spent, even travels costs. It all adds up.

Generally gear costs should total under $2000 with at least half of that usually spent on saddlery and mounts. Choosing cheaper secondhand options can bring this down. Be aware that while the grooming and first aid gear can be bought prior to the horse, the other things should only be purchased after a suitable horse is found.

A six piece grooming kit (curry, dandy, body, comb, hoof pick and scraper) will be adequate, polo wraps aren't necessary, for a first horse leg protection (if required) brushing boots are good. Worry about shampoo etc later. Same with lunge gear, breast plate, spare lead ropes, girth cover etc. Two halters and leads are good to have - you only need one of everything else.

As far as monthly costs, this is something you should sit down with your parents and discuss. Talk about where you would keep your horse, how often you would see it etc. Then call up to get board quotes, farrier quotes, vet quotes, and feed quotes if required. Asking online is only the broadest of guides, the monthly price could vary from $100 a month to $1000 a month depending on different areas and ideas of care.
Thanks you!!!!
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post #20 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 12:38 PM
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I have to say I agree you are overthinking it. Yes always round up with budgets but even at the very beginning:
1 Mane Pulling Comb (IF you want to pull the mane, you can also use this as a regular comb)
2 Mane Combs
1 Tail Comb
2 Mane and Tail Brushes so you basically have FIVE different brushes for the mane and tail? Get one.

Then:
Water (do you need to pay for this??)
Hay
Alfalfa
Grass
Supplements
Treats
Oats
so your horse is going to eat regular hay, alfalfa hay, grass, AND oats, supplements and treats?

You aren't ready yet because you don't actually know what you need!

The most important part is board vet and farrier. Those will add up pretty quickly.

It really depends on your location. One of my horses is about $80/month over the winter which includes a small amount of hay (easy keeping horses at about 1.2% of body weight) and a couple quarts of grain a day. This does NOT include shavings or anything calculated less then monthly (farrier/vet/worming) nor an emergency budget nor day to day supplies.

Aside from feed and such you have feed/water buckets. Bedding if your horse is stalled. Halter and lead. Sounds like you may need to set up pasture? That will be expensive. Brushes (hard and soft and curry and a hoof pick). First aid kit and thrush treatment. Fly spray/mask. Anything particular for the individual horse. For riding bridle/bit and saddle and a few pads. You probably don't need boots/wraps depending on you needs. Now you WILL end up with more stuff but you really do not NEED more stuff! Unless it's something you need a back up of or use several don't buy several!

Just start simple.

First worry about building a pasture and barn/set up etc.

Do you really need FOUR curries?

If you aren't showing why do you need a trailer kit? Do you have a trailer?

For the first aid kit I would recommend buying a premade one to start out of. I'm not sure you have the right idea with that.

Just start from the beginning and slow down a little :)

Personally I'd want a lot more than 1,000 in an emergency fund.
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