What kind of budget should I have for a potential horse? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 01:28 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Cambridge, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenhaven View Post
I spent several thousand dollars setting up fences (did all the work myself), building shelters for them and purchasing a trailer. If you have a trailer you must also have a vehicle sturdy enough to pull it.
Good post, greenhaven.

The big five startup expenses for owning a horse on your property:
  1. Truck -- even if you don't have a trailer you'll need a way to haul hay
  2. Trailer -- unless you have lots of good riding from your doorstep and never want to meet anyone for a trail ride or haul a sick horse to the vet
  3. Fence -- no such thing as a cheap fence that will be safe and keep your horses where they belong
  4. Mower -- the most important thing you can do to maintain your pasture is keep the weeds mowed. Horses eat what they like and leave the rest
  5. Shelter -- a simple three-sided shelter is adequate even in our Minnesota climate, but even that is $1,500 unless you build it yourself out of scrap.
I spend less than $500 a year on each of my two horses, but it helps that I do my own trimming and have had only the most minor of medical emergencies over the years.
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post #22 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 02:22 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Louisiana
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I would personally have more than $1000 aside for emergencies. In the equine world an emergency vet incident can easily add up to more than that. I've gone through most of my horse career with no huge vet bills, but recently my horse added up a $3000+ bill and still had to be euthanized. That said, I don't expect horse owners to keep a crazy amount of money on hand and spend whatever is necessary on one horse. However, if you don't you need to know where to draw the line and ALWAYS have enough money aside to at least pay for euthanasia and disposal of the body if you cannot afford expensive treatment. That can cost more than you think with horse-sized animals. Insurance is also an option, though would obviously increase your monthly expenses.

The initial expenses are not the worst part of horse ownership, though you obviously do need the money up front for them. Those include purchase price of horse (can range from free to obscenely high), tack, equipment, grooming supplies, etc. The thing that really adds up is all of the regular expenses once you own the horse. Stuff like board, farrier, and regular vet bills. The only way you will know what those costs are like in your area are by talking to horsey people around you, inquiring about boarding costs (remembering that cheaper isn't necessarily a good thing, but more expensive doesn't always correlate to an increase in quality of care), talk to farriers about their rates, and vets about the cost of vaccinations, dental work, etc.
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post #23 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 03:19 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 253
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That's a great list but in all honesty, you probably won't need all of it! Everything I have in my tack room is a necessity (I'm a student). Of course, it all depends on the horse, but this is pretty basic. So here's what I have and how much it cost (approx.):

- Shelter, feed bin, water bin, mat, and shavings $990
- 3 saddle pads $55
- 1 half pad $65
- 1 saddle $345
- 1 girth $45
- 1 bridle (reins included) $55
- 1 bit $22
- Liniment, clay poultice, vet wrap, and wound care $40
- 1 set of shipping boots (bought from Tractor Supply) $22
- Hard brush, soft brush, face brush, rubber curry comb, shedding blade, sweat scraper, hoof pick $26
- Treats and toys $40 (treats last me a long time since I don't give her very many)
- 1 rope halter, 2 nylon halters, 2 lead ropes $65
- 2 lunge lines, 1 lunge whip, 1 dressage whip, 1 crop $60
- Pegasus AirBoots and no turn overreach boots $100
- Supplements (MSM & Psyllium) $16/month
- Fly spray, sheet, and mask $65
- Expected vet visits $165/year
- Farrier $65 every 7 weeks
- Chiropractor $95 every 6 months
- 2 bales of 3 way and 2 bales of alfalfa $68/month
- Salt block $15/month
- Lessons $140/month for my mare and $260/month for me at my other barn

I think that covers most things. Apart from the vet, farrier, chiro, etc. I am pretty cheap. I go on every tack site and ebay to make sure I'm getting the best deals. Obviously, if you are able to it would be great to have really nice tack. If not though, just make sure you don't lose quality!

For mane and tail detangler, I bought a spray can of organic coconut oil. I spray some on the comb for the mane and then spray all over the tail a couple times. My mare is notorious for having a barbed wire-like tail that takes me 40 minutes to comb through. With the coconut oil, it takes me 5 minutes. I use the same oil to clean my bridle and saddle. I also use it on my mare's hooves as a hoof conditioner!
Along with that, for every holiday and birthday my friends and family buy me horsey things so I didn't actually buy a lot of my things.

On the flip side, my trainer boards her horses at the stable where I take jumping lessons. It's $600 a month for board alone and she has her own barn of horses...
Seriously depends on your area, your horse's needs, and how much you're comfortable spending.

Hope this helped (:

c'est la vie
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post #24 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 04:01 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
I have to say I agree you are overthinking it. Yes always round up with budgets but even at the very beginning:
1 Mane Pulling Comb (IF you want to pull the mane, you can also use this as a regular comb)
2 Mane Combs
1 Tail Comb
2 Mane and Tail Brushes so you basically have FIVE different brushes for the mane and tail? Get one.

Then:
Water (do you need to pay for this??)
Hay
Alfalfa
Grass
Supplements
Treats
Oats
so your horse is going to eat regular hay, alfalfa hay, grass, AND oats, supplements and treats?

You aren't ready yet because you don't actually know what you need!

The most important part is board vet and farrier. Those will add up pretty quickly.

It really depends on your location. One of my horses is about $80/month over the winter which includes a small amount of hay (easy keeping horses at about 1.2% of body weight) and a couple quarts of grain a day. This does NOT include shavings or anything calculated less then monthly (farrier/vet/worming) nor an emergency budget nor day to day supplies.

Aside from feed and such you have feed/water buckets. Bedding if your horse is stalled. Halter and lead. Sounds like you may need to set up pasture? That will be expensive. Brushes (hard and soft and curry and a hoof pick). First aid kit and thrush treatment. Fly spray/mask. Anything particular for the individual horse. For riding bridle/bit and saddle and a few pads. You probably don't need boots/wraps depending on you needs. Now you WILL end up with more stuff but you really do not NEED more stuff! Unless it's something you need a back up of or use several don't buy several!

Just start simple.

First worry about building a pasture and barn/set up etc.

Do you really need FOUR curries?

If you aren't showing why do you need a trailer kit? Do you have a trailer?

For the first aid kit I would recommend buying a premade one to start out of. I'm not sure you have the right idea with that.

Just start from the beginning and slow down a little :)

Personally I'd want a lot more than 1,000 in an emergency fund.
Thanks for the input! And I admit I kind of overthink things but I know that I wouldn't feed my horse all those things I just put them there because I wanted a budget idea and I won't know what the horse eats till I'm going to buy it. And if I move to a horse property, it would be one with paddocks and a barn already set up. I appreciate your advice!
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post #25 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 04:01 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aclassicalpaint View Post
That's a great list but in all honesty, you probably won't need all of it! Everything I have in my tack room is a necessity (I'm a student). Of course, it all depends on the horse, but this is pretty basic. So here's what I have and how much it cost (approx.):

- Shelter, feed bin, water bin, mat, and shavings $990
- 3 saddle pads $55
- 1 half pad $65
- 1 saddle $345
- 1 girth $45
- 1 bridle (reins included) $55
- 1 bit $22
- Liniment, clay poultice, vet wrap, and wound care $40
- 1 set of shipping boots (bought from Tractor Supply) $22
- Hard brush, soft brush, face brush, rubber curry comb, shedding blade, sweat scraper, hoof pick $26
- Treats and toys $40 (treats last me a long time since I don't give her very many)
- 1 rope halter, 2 nylon halters, 2 lead ropes $65
- 2 lunge lines, 1 lunge whip, 1 dressage whip, 1 crop $60
- Pegasus AirBoots and no turn overreach boots $100
- Supplements (MSM & Psyllium) $16/month
- Fly spray, sheet, and mask $65
- Expected vet visits $165/year
- Farrier $65 every 7 weeks
- Chiropractor $95 every 6 months
- 2 bales of 3 way and 2 bales of alfalfa $68/month
- Salt block $15/month
- Lessons $140/month for my mare and $260/month for me at my other barn

I think that covers most things. Apart from the vet, farrier, chiro, etc. I am pretty cheap. I go on every tack site and ebay to make sure I'm getting the best deals. Obviously, if you are able to it would be great to have really nice tack. If not though, just make sure you don't lose quality!

For mane and tail detangler, I bought a spray can of organic coconut oil. I spray some on the comb for the mane and then spray all over the tail a couple times. My mare is notorious for having a barbed wire-like tail that takes me 40 minutes to comb through. With the coconut oil, it takes me 5 minutes. I use the same oil to clean my bridle and saddle. I also use it on my mare's hooves as a hoof conditioner!
Along with that, for every holiday and birthday my friends and family buy me horsey things so I didn't actually buy a lot of my things.

On the flip side, my trainer boards her horses at the stable where I take jumping lessons. It's $600 a month for board alone and she has her own barn of horses...
Seriously depends on your area, your horse's needs, and how much you're comfortable spending.

Hope this helped (:

Thanks so much!!!!! It helped a lot!
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post #26 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 05:50 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 462
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Since you are not the one paying for the horse you are not the one budgeting. The fact that your "budgeting" list consists primarily of grooming supplies says you are not ready for horse ownership quite yet. Grooming supplies are insignificant to the cost of ownership. I would consider leasing as an option first in order to get a better indication of the costs and commitment needed for maintaining horses.

It also depends on the costs in your area and the availability of quality services in your area. The cheapest boarding barn, farrier, vet, equipment, etc. may not always be the highest quality and can cost you even more in the long run. The costs someone puts up here can be misleading since they vary so drastically from area to area. As someone else mentioned hay in their area costs $5/bale. In my area if hay cost that amount it usually moldy hay that would make your horse sick! Here hay costs around $15-25/bale for good quality hay not including the cost of delivery or gas/truck/trailer to pick it up yourself. A good saddle can cost you anywhere between $500-5000. If it is below that it is usually something in need of costly repairs in order to be safe and functional or cheap, crappy saddles made in India that should never touch the back of a horse nonetheless be sat on. The saddle must properly fit BOTH you and the horse. Poorly fitting saddles will cost you in veterinary services, training issues, chiropractic/massage services, etc. I had a poorly fitting saddle wind up giving me horrible hip and back pain. You must also purchase replacement tack in case something breaks (my first horse broke 2 $100 bridles the first week I brought her home). Farrier services can run from $45 for a basic barefoot trim up to $300 for specialty shoeing every 6-8weeks. If you have a horse with poor feet, supplementation and more frequent farrier work may be required. Each horse has unique dietary needs and require a ration balancer. Grain is usually about $15-35/bag. A 50lb bag can last for a 10 day supply up to a 50 day supply as some can be fed at a rate of 1lb/day as others can be up to 5lb/day.

Vet services are pricy no matter where you are and accidents/illnesses happen no matter how safe an environment you try to provide for your horse. Surgery can costs up to several thousands with colic surgeries being about $10,000 minimum not including hospitalization costs with a deposit of usually $5000 down. Also as mentioned before you should at least have the budget to pay for euthanasia and disposal should worst come to worst. I've seen euthanasia around here cost about $200 minimum with disposal being around $350-400. If your horse comes up lame one day diagnostics can easily run up into the thousands. I would highly recommend getting a PPE on any horse you decide to buy. I had a friend who wanted to buy a young prospect for eventing. On the flexion test it was determined that the horse had a subtle lameness. The seller said the horse was probably sore from being shod. My friend decided to do further diagnostics to determine if the lameness was something manageable or reversible and ended up finding out that the horse had bone chips in both front fetlocks and quite severe arthritic changes that would limit the horse from being able to withstand the demands of eventing. She ended up spending almost $1k in diagnostics for a horse she did not even buy. You must also have a plan if your horse becomes permanently unsound for riding.

Owning horses on your own property can be very expensive as well depending on the region you live in. If you want to start from scratch start-up costs can easily become astronomical or if you want to purchase an already established horse property that will be even more expensive. Paying for the mortgage is something you as a child can not even fathom. You must have access to water, electricity, etc. Either you will have to pay for city water or dig a well (and you must have access to a secondary water source if your well dries up or becomes contaminated). You also have to have a waste management and pasture conservation plan that is compliant with your particular district including the machinery to be able to upkeep the land such as tractors, mowers, etc. You're going to need a lot more stable supplies than just pitchforks and water buckets. You will also need at least two wheelbarrows (one for feeding one for manure), hardware, lighting, fencing, gates, insect/pest control, storage areas, sheds, shovels, hoses, cold weather supplies, pallets to store the hay, etc. You also have to take fireproofing and insurance into consideration. Labor is also a major factor in addition to costs. Do your parents want to be responsible for maintaining a horse property 365days/year? Do they want to wake up early mornings to feed, muck, do chores, etc. in addition to having to go to work to pay for everything? Do they also want to become involved in horses or is all of this solely for you? Will this be something they want to maintain long term if you go to college? Hope that whatever property you move to has good neighbors. Awful neighbors can easily ruin all of the heart, soul, investments you've put into your property (you know like the ones firing their guns near your horses or running a meth lab in their basement...)!

Bottom line...horses are expensive. Since you are not going to be the one paying your parents need to be fully aware of the costs horse ownership entails if they intend to buy you a horse or purchase horse property.
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post #27 of 36 Old 06-28-2015, 06:56 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canterklutz View Post
Since you are not the one paying for the horse you are not the one budgeting. The fact that your "budgeting" list consists primarily of grooming supplies says you are not ready for horse ownership quite yet. Grooming supplies are insignificant to the cost of ownership. I would consider leasing as an option first in order to get a better indication of the costs and commitment needed for maintaining horses.

It also depends on the costs in your area and the availability of quality services in your area. The cheapest boarding barn, farrier, vet, equipment, etc. may not always be the highest quality and can cost you even more in the long run. The costs someone puts up here can be misleading since they vary so drastically from area to area. As someone else mentioned hay in their area costs $5/bale. In my area if hay cost that amount it usually moldy hay that would make your horse sick! Here hay costs around $15-25/bale for good quality hay not including the cost of delivery or gas/truck/trailer to pick it up yourself. A good saddle can cost you anywhere between $500-5000. If it is below that it is usually something in need of costly repairs in order to be safe and functional or cheap, crappy saddles made in India that should never touch the back of a horse nonetheless be sat on. The saddle must properly fit BOTH you and the horse. Poorly fitting saddles will cost you in veterinary services, training issues, chiropractic/massage services, etc. I had a poorly fitting saddle wind up giving me horrible hip and back pain. You must also purchase replacement tack in case something breaks (my first horse broke 2 $100 bridles the first week I brought her home). Farrier services can run from $45 for a basic barefoot trim up to $300 for specialty shoeing every 6-8weeks. If you have a horse with poor feet, supplementation and more frequent farrier work may be required. Each horse has unique dietary needs and require a ration balancer. Grain is usually about $15-35/bag. A 50lb bag can last for a 10 day supply up to a 50 day supply as some can be fed at a rate of 1lb/day as others can be up to 5lb/day.

Vet services are pricy no matter where you are and accidents/illnesses happen no matter how safe an environment you try to provide for your horse. Surgery can costs up to several thousands with colic surgeries being about $10,000 minimum not including hospitalization costs with a deposit of usually $5000 down. Also as mentioned before you should at least have the budget to pay for euthanasia and disposal should worst come to worst. I've seen euthanasia around here cost about $200 minimum with disposal being around $350-400. If your horse comes up lame one day diagnostics can easily run up into the thousands. I would highly recommend getting a PPE on any horse you decide to buy. I had a friend who wanted to buy a young prospect for eventing. On the flexion test it was determined that the horse had a subtle lameness. The seller said the horse was probably sore from being shod. My friend decided to do further diagnostics to determine if the lameness was something manageable or reversible and ended up finding out that the horse had bone chips in both front fetlocks and quite severe arthritic changes that would limit the horse from being able to withstand the demands of eventing. She ended up spending almost $1k in diagnostics for a horse she did not even buy. You must also have a plan if your horse becomes permanently unsound for riding.

Owning horses on your own property can be very expensive as well depending on the region you live in. If you want to start from scratch start-up costs can easily become astronomical or if you want to purchase an already established horse property that will be even more expensive. Paying for the mortgage is something you as a child can not even fathom. You must have access to water, electricity, etc. Either you will have to pay for city water or dig a well (and you must have access to a secondary water source if your well dries up or becomes contaminated). You also have to have a waste management and pasture conservation plan that is compliant with your particular district including the machinery to be able to upkeep the land such as tractors, mowers, etc. You're going to need a lot more stable supplies than just pitchforks and water buckets. You will also need at least two wheelbarrows (one for feeding one for manure), hardware, lighting, fencing, gates, insect/pest control, storage areas, sheds, shovels, hoses, cold weather supplies, pallets to store the hay, etc. You also have to take fireproofing and insurance into consideration. Labor is also a major factor in addition to costs. Do your parents want to be responsible for maintaining a horse property 365days/year? Do they want to wake up early mornings to feed, muck, do chores, etc. in addition to having to go to work to pay for everything? Do they also want to become involved in horses or is all of this solely for you? Will this be something they want to maintain long term if you go to college? Hope that whatever property you move to has good neighbors. Awful neighbors can easily ruin all of the heart, soul, investments you've put into your property (you know like the ones firing their guns near your horses or running a meth lab in their basement...)!

Bottom line...horses are expensive. Since you are not going to be the one paying your parents need to be fully aware of the costs horse ownership entails if they intend to buy you a horse or purchase horse property.
Thanks! Yeah I was just wondering how much all of this stuff would cost. I get that horse ownership is expensive and I appreciate your help! I'm just trying to figure out the costs of all of this stuff because I want to have enough to afford all of this when I get a horse. I know vet farrier and boarding all depends on where I am! Thanks though!
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post #28 of 36 Old 06-29-2015, 01:59 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: west coast
Posts: 1,484
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Haven't read other replies.

It greatly depends on area. No body here knows what board/feed/vet/farrier costs in your area are. You also have no way of knowing what your set costs will be - what if the horse needs supplements? what if there's an emergency? what if you board at a great barn that is on the cheaper side, and you need to move the horse for whatever reason and the only place with a spot happens to be significantly more (some areas don't have an abundance of boarding barns). Those are only some things to consider, but I can guarantee you that things won't always go as you plan, and that includes the financial side of things.

I live in a pricey area, and the absolute minimum per month I spend on two mares is $1300. My barn includes my feed and supplements (most don't include supplements), so the cost only includes my board and farrier cost. Including vet cost, and random supplements that my barn does not supply, and chiropractor costs/other misc. things it's probably $2500-$3000 average per month. The most I have ever spent per 1 month is probably around the $5000 mark - and that would have been due to a month where I needed a bunch of these "misc." costs, plus some emergency vet fees.

Of course this will vary SO much by area. I know of people in the same province as me that are maybe 6-10 hours north and they have their horses on property and can get away with spending maybe $1300 per YEAR. I wish that were the case for me, lol.
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post #29 of 36 Old 06-29-2015, 10:07 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 26
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That is a very nice detailed list, but I say you should cut it in half. Atleast! You don't need all of that stuff.
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post #30 of 36 Old 07-02-2015, 06:29 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 30
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Ok so real fast:
PLEASE don't buy a regular mane-pulling comb for your horse!
There are ones you can get for $15 that cut the hair instead of pulling it from the roots.
I work at a rescue, and there's this one OTTB that will not let anyone touch her mane because of the pain of pulling. Believe me, your horse will thank you.
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