When I get my first horse, what should I look for? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 20 Old 04-03-2015, 10:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KrysPel View Post
PrivatePilot, Certainly! I've worked with horses in stables and ranches for nearly three years and have had on-off riding lessons for nearly two. My family has gone over all the the costs and expenses as well, on top of that, I'm home schooled and finishing my last year of Highschool, so I diffidently have time for commitment!
Ok, that's reasonable. That said, I would want to be an accomplished rider before ever considering ownership unless you're willing to bring in a coach or trainer to work you or your new horse through problems you may experience after purchase - is that something you've considered or budgeted for?

And can you share your budget? Not to be confrontational, but lots of us here have seen budgets drawn up (by others considering ownership) that contain a lot of holes, or are not realistic. There's plenty of people here who would like to help you with making sure yours is realistic so there's no surprises for you afterwards.

You didn't mention what discipline you're looking to ride in, either. The suggestion by someone else to find a 10+ year old ranch horse is a great one assuming you're wanting to ride western? Things change if you're talking english.

Another question..are you going onto further education? If you're in your last year of high school, what's in your future? College..university? Will you have the time to dedicate to your horse at that point? Online equine classifieds are littered with "I'm in college and I don't have time for my horse anymore so I'm looking for a part boarder / leaser / someone to buy him" ads for a very good reason. The expenses nor care requirements don't stop - remember, even if you buy a 10 year old you're still looking at a 20+ year (or more) commitment ahead of you.
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post #12 of 20 Old 04-03-2015, 11:18 AM
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Another question..are you going onto further education? If you're in your last year of high school, what's in your future? College..university? Will you have the time to dedicate to your horse at that point? Online equine classifieds are littered with "I'm in college and I don't have time for my horse anymore so I'm looking for a part boarder / leaser / someone to buy him" ads for a very good reason. The expenses nor care requirements don't stop - remember, even if you buy a 10 year old you're still looking at a 20+ year (or more) commitment ahead of you.[/QUOTE]

Great point, PP! If plans are to go away to school, you might want to consider a lease.
Others have pretty much said it...sound, good disposition, mature with solid training, and NO stallions.

Keep us posted and welcome to the forum.

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, it's because your tactics suck. ~ Marine 1SGT J. Reifinger
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post #13 of 20 Old 04-03-2015, 11:25 AM
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It sounds like you might want to take some time and educate yourself a bit more on horses before you push forward and get one of your own.
Online classes are a beautiful thing.
I'm not saying you're not ready, I'm just saying it would help you out a LOT to have a bit more background knowledge.
I've been riding horses for 16 years and have owned my own horse for 11, I STILL ask my barn owner to double check something I think may be wrong, just to confirm it for me. I still take lessons, I still take online courses, I still read books.
Like Skiafoxmorgan said, horses WILL humble you.

We all need a bit more information though to help you out!
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post #14 of 20 Old 04-03-2015, 01:45 PM Thread Starter
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You all have great points! The only reason I included a stallion is because when I worked at the stables, there were some trainers and owners who simply swore by them, especially in their 10-15+ age ranges. I didn't want to fully exclude them, but I was leaning more toward a mare/gelding anyhow, since it seems as though they are much more beginner friendly. I realize I probably should have explained that a little bit more. It's not that I'm uneducated, I was a little skeptical on considering them for a first horse, of course.

I diffidently don't want to exclude an entire gender because I feel like I could miss out on a really friendly horse with all the points that I need. From what I'm gathering an already well trained horse would be the best thing to look for, one that's rather calm. I like the term steady Eddie, you're right Skiafoxmorgan.

I actually have considered budgeting for a trainer actually, in fact my dad is also experienced in horses as well. Not necessarily as far as their health goes, he's not experienced in the veterinarian side of things, but as far as riding goes, he knows quite a bit! So even when the trainer is not there and if I'm not taking classes, I'd still have him when I didn't have the others. So I feel like that's a big help as well.

As far as discipline goes, I'm more drawn to the Western discipline, so I'm glad to hear that a 10+ horse would be a plus in that department!

And for further education, I don't plan on going to a college or university so that's very not likely for my future. I have taken A.P college level courses all through high school, got straight A's and am getting a honors diploma so I feel like I'm alright on that department. I mainly just plan on working on my families small little farm; we are planning on expanding so we can make more of a profit and we currently raise pigs and hogs, poultry, a small herd of cows and sheep. :)

Hopefully I'm not forgetting anything in my response, I've gotten a lot of replies and thank you for them! I'm diffidently expecting to get some surprises when working with horses, I know that working with them part time versus owning them is an entirely different thing, but hey, you have to start somewhere right? I know a family friend who is 50 something years old and has worked with and owned horses for 30 years and still says she gets surprised by them and learns new things every day! I see that as kind of a reward... :)

That being said I don't plan on buying a horse within the next month or so, more like, within the next year and maybe a little more after that. I really want to put some thought and responsibility into this and want to get all my facts straight and literally as much research and insight as I can get.
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post #15 of 20 Old 04-03-2015, 01:53 PM
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Have you considered leasing a horse and taking lessons with a decent trainer first?
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post #16 of 20 Old 04-03-2015, 02:16 PM
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Hi!

I would recommend either a mare or gelding, NOT a stallion! That could cause issues if he were to escape and meet up with someone else's mare. Personally, I'd say gelding.

From your experience, I'd shy away from anything as young as 6-7. I'd be looking more for 10+. A good horse that has a lot of training and can do what you want. Are you interested in showing or just trail riding?

Find a horse that suits what you want. Temperament and training should be very important.

Keep going, keep moving forward. You'll get it together someday.
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post #17 of 20 Old 04-03-2015, 02:37 PM
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I think you would find out the trainers/owners who talk highly of stallions are very high-end highly accomplished riders - A stallion is absolutely positively not something you want to even remotely consider given your level of experience and situation overall.

Since you looking at Western I would lean back towards what others have suggested and be hunting around for a 10+ year old well experienced "been there done that" type horse. Just be prepared to perform lots of due diligence before rushing to buy the first one you fall in love with - I would want to have had several long rides in a variety of different environments echoing what you wish to do with him/her, as well as have a clean a veterinary check out before proceeding. The Internet is littered with new horse owners that jumped in without doing their homework first, only to find out that they are now stuck with a medical disaster of a horse, or one with so many vices or behavioral / training holes that it makes them unsuitable or dangerous to ride without a lot of costly training.

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post #18 of 20 Old 04-03-2015, 02:45 PM
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I am going to recommend you pay someone with many years of experience to assess the horse you think you'd like to buy. Don't let your heart rule your head. We've heard plenty of disaster stories from people who did. I have gone with riders, watched their skill level with the horse, then checked a few things that might indicate if the horse has been drugged. I also watch how the horse moves, looking for even a hint of lameness. If so far, so good, I will have the rider ride away from the barn, back and forth a few times to see if the horse will react beyond the rider's skills. If that all passes then the vet is called for the prepurchase exam.



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post #19 of 20 Old 04-05-2015, 04:37 PM
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I used to think go for the geldings, they're more stabled type of personality but honestly, mares can be too. Mares can be nice as the gelding are, you just gotta be more careful and strict for your search if you come across a mare. I would recommend getting a mare from a person that you know and trust, due to some people can be pretty weird with their answers.
If you're looking for a been there and done that type horses, go for 10 and older horses but if you're interested in learning how to deal with horses are more challenging and require more miles or training to put into it, 10 and younger is fine.
Please bring most trusted person with you that knows their stuff, they should have a good idea of what you're looking for, what you're capable of riding and they'll keep you from getting into wrong side of the business when it comes to buying horses. Get a vet check, trial period are the two biggest things you will want to do for sure! People would sometimes sedate their horses to make them look better or they can be fine on that day and next time, they're crazy. You'll want to see the worst side of the horse, that way you can think to yourself can you handle this horse's worst moments or not.
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post #20 of 20 Old 04-05-2015, 04:55 PM
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Definitely no stallions. Mares are good, though they can sometimes be crabby during heat, and geldings by far have the most steady temperaments. Also, be SURE not to get a horse that is too much for you. Some people think they need to buy a high strung, young horse and train it themselves so they can have a "bond" (not saying you'll do this, just an example ), when really, what they need is a quiet, steady horse to LEARN on. Try to get a horse that is around 9, 10, or older. So basically, a quiet, 9 or 10 gelding or mare would probably be a safe bet.

Good luck!
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