Whoa - how instant is reasonable? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 50Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 24 Old 08-20-2016, 03:33 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Montana
Posts: 851
• Horses: 2
I agree that having your horse light in the bridle and off his front end is more important than simply him being able to stop immediately. I've mainly worked with reining horses so all the horses I train learn the meaning of "whoa". To slow down I use "easy", which I find makes it easier for the horse to understand. But you must understand, a good stop is months in the making, working at it every time you ride (even if you only do it once per ride; you don't want to make the horse sour), and it involves more than just teaching your horse to stop. Backing up, yielding to leg pressure, becoming light on the bit, vertical flexion, etc etc. There are so many components to a good stop! And of course learning to read your seat is a very large component as well.
Of course that is all assuming that when you ask your horse to stop you want to leave a nice clean 11 in the arena behind you, and a horse that buries his butt in the ground on ze double. If you're just looking for a horse to stop, you can do it any way you like. As others have said, any horse can stop on the instant. It takes lots of training for a horse to instantly stop well and balanced.

-- Kai
Yogiwick and Woodhaven like this.
Kaifyre is offline  
post #12 of 24 Old 08-20-2016, 08:36 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: OK
Posts: 13,725
• Horses: 9
When I'm working with my green horses, I lift the rein just a little bit (my cue that a change is coming) and then I take my legs off their sides, sit down in the saddle and say, "Whoa". I expect the horse to stop right now when I ask. When they are really green, they may just stop the gait they're in, i.e. from trot to walk, and stop fully in 1 or 2 steps. Once they stop fully I back the horse 4 or 5 steps, not hard, just working on the back while we're at it. I find it helps them get under themselves before I ask them to take off again. Once they've progressed I start asking for the "Whoa" and expecting it a lot quicker. For your horse, I'd lift my rein, take my legs off, sit down and expect her to stop, RIGHT NOW. If she didn't, I'd be sitting down hard, and lifting my rein so that she felt it and she'd be backing very quickly if she didn't stop right away. Make the right thing easy, the wrong thing hard or more work. Stopping right away, and STANDING STILL, after stopping are safety issues and she needs to not cheat.
Yogiwick likes this.

Dreamcatcher Arabians is offline  
post #13 of 24 Old 08-20-2016, 11:21 AM
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Olds Alberta Canada
Posts: 12,041
• Horses: 0
Agree with what has been said,except I only back a horse if he does not stop correctly, and not as part of every stop
I show in trail also quite a bit, so my horses also have to learn not to take un asked for steps. Thus, they will back when I raise my hand slightly and add leg, and also stop, the minute I lower rein hand and take leg off. The last thing you want to create, is a horse that zooms backwards, taking out the rails of an obstacle!
smrobs and StephaniHren like this.
Smilie is offline  
post #14 of 24 Old 08-20-2016, 11:22 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: New England
Posts: 12,001
• Horses: 3
You can touch your horses mouth without "yanking on the reins"..

You won't get her to stop any faster if you refuse to touch her mouth. The above post is excellent.
bsms likes this.
Yogiwick is offline  
post #15 of 24 Old 08-20-2016, 04:46 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Midwest
Posts: 455
• Horses: 1
Thank you all - I'm going to read and re-read the above posts and absorb the info. I have a Word document where I keep the great advice I find on this forum - and all this is going in! Everything you said makes sense.

I suspect any of you could have my mare doing an instant stop within 10 minutes of getting on... I'm sure she has the training and like I said her stops used to be snappier. You've given me some great things to work on. I'm going to start with becoming more aware how to set her up for the stop (frankly never really thought about my part in that), then focus on better position with the reins and light contact, and then when I'm feeling confident in my ability to be clear with seat and reins etc, I'll follow Dreamcatcher's advice and Expect her to stop. I'm not anticipating this will take long. Thank you for the clarity!

She's a terrific horse for me to learn from - every time so far that I've encountered something, she rewards me quickly when I 'get it right'. Who's training Whom....?!
Yogiwick and mkmurphy81 like this.

I'm a mid-lifer finally making time for horses... Having a blast, but there's soooo much to learn -
Folly is offline  
post #16 of 24 Old 08-20-2016, 07:34 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 22,320
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
Agree with what has been said,except I only back a horse if he does not stop correctly, and not as part of every stop
I show in trail also quite a bit, so my horses also have to learn not to take un asked for steps. Thus, they will back when I raise my hand slightly and add leg, and also stop, the minute I lower rein hand and take leg off. The last thing you want to create, is a horse that zooms backwards, taking out the rails of an obstacle!

This is true. After a horse is stopping correctly, I don't back up unless I need to (roping, etc) or unless they don't stop the way they should.


Ideally, a good stop should consist of nothing more than ceasing forward motion, but doing it right can sometimes be so tricky LOL. I very seldom use verbal cues in my riding because it can sometimes be confusing to the horse if riding in a group....but moreso because I work cattle and being overly verbose can cause problems with spooking them (we usually get goofy, running-off things that will bolt through fences if your horse snorts or a twig breaks LOL). However, every horse I train from day 1 is taught that a firm WHOA means that they need to absolutely freeze every muscle in their body right where it's at. I use that more than any other verbal cues and it has saved tack and horses after ending up in a wreck with fencing or ropes or cattle or even if they start to panic and blow up.
JCnGrace likes this.
smrobs is offline  
post #17 of 24 Old 08-20-2016, 09:38 PM
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Olds Alberta Canada
Posts: 12,041
• Horses: 0
Agree about verbal cues, once a horse has transferred them to riding, I don't use them, except I did use them in a reining stop, but certainly not in equitation type classes.
I also have found a few situations, where I used that whoa, in an emergency type of situation, with the horse having retained an ingrained response to it
Once, when Smilie was two, and we got accidentally into a nest of ground hornets, that ingrained response allowed me enough pause, even as she was being stung, to get her head checked around, and step off
Once, riding home down the road, on a completely draped rein, not bothering to take up any slack as that car cam towards us, as Smilie is very good with traffic, the young driver of that old car, gunned the motor, soon as he was just past us, with that old car giving off several loud back fires, that startled even me.
Before \i could ever gather up reins, Smilie took a few bolting jumps, but stopped dead, when I yelled ,'whoa'
Thus, while I don't regularity go around use voice cues, I find having that 'whoa' is just another tool in some situations
I attended a clinic (just watching ) by Stacy Westfall , and she explained as to how that bridless reining demo was possible, using the stop as the example
She teaches her horses to stop, using each of the three cues by themselves (reins, seat/legs and voice )
Thus, in a regular reining class, she can use all three together
Then in the tackless demo, she still has two left to use
smrobs and Yogiwick like this.
Smilie is offline  
post #18 of 24 Old 08-21-2016, 10:52 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: southern Arizona
Posts: 12,067
• Horses: 4
Go jogging, using your two legs. Now stop. How fast is fast enough for you? Sprint, then stop. How fast do you stop? Put a 30 lb backpack on and jog. Then stop. How fast is fast enough for you?

All of my horses CAN stop faster than I enjoy stopping. Outside of an emergency, though, I figure a good faith effort - similar to how I stop when I'm out jogging - is good enough. But I ride for fun on trails, and my body has more creaks and groans than my saddle does, so my view may be distorted.

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
bsms is offline  
post #19 of 24 Old 08-21-2016, 04:22 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Midwest
Posts: 455
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
Once, riding home down the road, on a completely draped rein, not bothering to take up any slack as that car cam towards us, as Smilie is very good with traffic, the young driver of that old car, gunned the motor, soon as he was just past us, with that old car giving off several loud back fires, that startled even me.
Before \i could ever gather up reins, Smilie took a few bolting jumps, but stopped dead, when I yelled ,'whoa'
I had a similar thing happen - and that was the day I turned the corner and realized I could trust this horse - And that she has some level of trust in me now. A storm was blowing in and the wind kicked up. A friend and I were hurrying (just fast walk) to beat it back to the barn which was not far away up the lane between paddocks, and suddenly a gate which had been left open slammed right behind/beside in our blind spot - Kota lurched forward (as did the other horse)... I was startled too as it sounded like a gunshot. She probably got 3 good strides in before I got my head together and said Whoa! as I was sitting back and gathering the reins - and she immediately slowed to an easy walk before I even pulled back (can't remember if she actually stopped and I then urged her forward to hurry on, or if she just slowed to a walk). I just remember instead of being scared from that spook (the only one I've really experienced on her), I was laughing because it such a joy to have ridden through it with her, and it was 'exciting' but never out-of-control. Anyway, she has a good stop. I'm the one who needs the work.

Appreciating the continuing comments and advice - I'm taking it all in.

I'm a mid-lifer finally making time for horses... Having a blast, but there's soooo much to learn -
Folly is offline  
post #20 of 24 Old 08-21-2016, 08:14 PM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,812
• Horses: 1
I ride quite often with slack reins and my guys know when I pick them up that hey a command is about to happen so pay attention, I ride usually in a Little S hackamore and as soon as Kenzie feels those shanks start to rotate and the chin strap tighten, she stops. If we are moving out, I expect her to instantly slow gait and depending on how fast we are going, depends on how fast I expect her to stop completely.

Do get a solid whoa. I was galloping Ty, racing a friend when my chicago screw came loose on my bridle, leaving me with only one rein. I yelled whoa and Ty stopped instantly.
Folly likes this.
Rain Shadow is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Pursuit of Instant Gratification bubba13 Horse Protection 85 07-07-2011 12:39 PM
Whoa, whoa Jynx, DON'T RUN ME OVER!!! MacabreMikolaj Horse Videos 13 03-14-2011 09:55 PM
AOL Instant Messenger... anyone? Britt General Off Topic Discussion 8 04-17-2009 09:29 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome